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Lemon

NEWS
July 2, 1999 | by Robert Strauss, For the Daily News
Q: Mosquitoes! We live near a creek, and assume the water is attracting these pests of the summer night. Are there any plants we could use to cut down on their numbers? - Andrea (via e-mail) A: First, get your pronunciation right - that's "crik," not "creek"! ("Creek" is what your shed door does.) And yes, there ARE plants that really CAN repel mosquitoes - but not the way you're probably thinking. Allow me to 'splain, Lucy, as I list 71/2 chemical-free ways to keep the skeeters from doing a Bela Lugosi all over your summertime tan . . . 1: Grow lemon balm.
FOOD
October 7, 1992 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Cat-lovers often have a problem: They love their pets but hate what they do to furniture, walls and woodwork. To de-claw is painful and can be dangerous for the pet, since even house cats occasionally get out, get lost and run into trouble. (Without claws, a cat can neither defend itself against other cats nor climb a tree to safety.) We provide a scratching post, of course, and encourage our cats to use it, by praise and by rubbing catnip along it. Still, they occasionally slip.
NEWS
April 12, 1996 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
No ice cream, gelati or frozen yogurt for us. That's wimp stuff for unfortunates in Akron and Tulsa. Water ice is Philadelphia's warm-weather treat. It's a cold sweet that makes a vanilla custard cone look as pathetic as a bologna and cheese next to a mushroom cheesesteak with sauce and onions. And the city's water ice stands are finally open. South Philly guys in the 1930s first sold water ice - chipped ice laced with fruit juice - from pushcarts. These days machines mix the water, sugar and fruit, but tradition is still a major part of water ice culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1986 | By DAVE BITTAN, Daily News Staff Writer
With the Memorial Day weekend here, it's the season for picnics, jaunts to the shore and Poconos - and homemade Italian water ice. The cool warm-weather treat makes the summer heat easier to tolerate. "I love water ice," says Nora Italiano, with enthusiasm. She makes one of the city's better ices at her Mom & Pop & Kids operation, 12th and Shunk in South Philly. A lemon crate sitting on the step in front of her shop, and two more inside, tip off the fact that lemon is her best-selling flavor.
NEWS
January 10, 2014
ERIC HELMS' The Juice Generation offers 100 recipes for healthy juice combinations. He said sales of the book will benefit Wellness in the Schools ( wellnessintheschools.org ), a nonprofit that teaches public-school kids about healthy eating, environmental awareness and fitness. Each recipe below makes one serving (about 12 ounces). Note that while ingredients vary, the instructions for each recipe are simple: Blend in a juicer, and drink. SUPADUPA GREENS 2 cups kale 1 cup spinach 1 cup parsley 2 leaves romaine 3 stalks celery 1 medium green apple 1/4 medium cucumber 1/4 medium lemon, peeled DAILY DETOX 5 medium carrots ¼ medium cucumber 1 medium apple 1 inch fresh gingerroot, peeled ½ medium lemon, peeled PERFECTLY PEAR 1 cup spinach 2 leaves romaine 1 medium pear 1/2 medium frozen banana 1 medium lemon, peeled 1 cup filtered water   Source: The Juice Generation: 100 Recipes for Fresh Juices and Superfood Smoothies     When Dallyn Pavey felt a few extra pounds settling onto her petite 5-foot-1-inch frame, the King of Prussia-based restaurant publicist turned to juicing to get back into balance.
FOOD
November 7, 1990 | By Libby Goldstein, Special to the Daily News
Bobbi Katz has been making her incredibly good hummus for nearly 20 years, but instead of stirring up a batch to take to a party, she's making it in vats these days. And sending it to supermarkets. Harriet's Favorite Hummus, which won a Philadelphia Magazine "Best of Philly" award this year, is not your traditional, find-it-in-any-veggie- cookbook hummus. Sure it has lots of chickpeas, garlic, fresh-squeezed lemon juice and a little olive oil . . . but there's also ginseng in it. And it's missing tahini - sesame seed butter - which means it's lower in fat than many other hummus recipes and more lemony tasting.
FOOD
April 15, 1992 | By Marcia Cone and Thelma Snyder, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Greek food is something that often comes to mind during the Easter season. The elaborate pageants held at many Greek Orthodox churches, followed by a joyous lamb feast, are all intriguing. But down through the centuries, during the seven weeks of Lent, those of the Greek Orthodox faith were forbidden to eat any animal product - meat, fish, eggs, butter, milk and cheese. The practice came about so that the believer might abstain from food containing blood or any food product derived from one having blood.
FOOD
October 22, 1986 | By NETTIE DUFFIELD, Special to the Daily News
Every once in a while I get a yen for veal, and when I doll amounts for one-person servings, I generally buy four chops and cook two very different meals. I like to use the chops, flattened and minus bone, for the breaded dish so I can save the bones for the next day's meal, giving the rice dish extra flavor. TARRAGON VEAL CUTLETS 2 small veal chops, about 1/2 inch thick, or 1 large veal cutlet 1 small egg 1/3 cup seasoned bread crumbs 2 teaspoons dry tarragon, crushed 1/4 teaspoon garlic salt 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground pepper Butter or oil for frying 1/2 lemon, cut into two wedges If using veal chops, remove meat from bone and reserve bones in refrigerator for future use. Pound meat between two sheets of waxed paper until flattened.
FOOD
February 8, 1989 | By Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Bali, the traveler's crown jewel of Indonesia, is a tiny dot in a string of tropical islands between the Java Sea and the Indian Ocean. Its palm-fringed hillsides are carved into rice paddy terraces that mirror the sky in the bright sunshine. Not the least of Bali's charms is its food, a conflagration of spices, truly a paradise for chili-lovers! The diet's mainstay is rice - they grow three crops a year - augmented by wonderful tropical fruits, vegetables and other foods. Balinese-style cooking is easily adapted to American kitchens, and beef is included in the recipes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1998 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Wallace Shawn doesn't want you to have a good time at the theater. He doesn't want you to leave feeling entertained, or instructed, or purged, or uplifted, or validated, or anything else that might suggest that a play of his did anything other than pose a vital question. He would be quite happy, though, if you left feeling honked off - at either the ideas in his play or the method by which they're presented. That would mean you paid attention. Shawn is a moralist masquerading as a playwright, a man who believes that if audiences are to respond to the theater's only legitimate purpose, which is to help us understand our world and cure its ills, they must be disabused of the idea that the playwright can do their work for them.
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