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NEWS
January 10, 2014
ERIC HELMS' The Juice Generation offers 100 recipes for healthy juice combinations. He said sales of the book will benefit Wellness in the Schools ( wellnessintheschools.org ), a nonprofit that teaches public-school kids about healthy eating, environmental awareness and fitness. Each recipe below makes one serving (about 12 ounces). Note that while ingredients vary, the instructions for each recipe are simple: Blend in a juicer, and drink. SUPADUPA GREENS 2 cups kale 1 cup spinach 1 cup parsley 2 leaves romaine 3 stalks celery 1 medium green apple 1/4 medium cucumber 1/4 medium lemon, peeled DAILY DETOX 5 medium carrots ¼ medium cucumber 1 medium apple 1 inch fresh gingerroot, peeled ½ medium lemon, peeled PERFECTLY PEAR 1 cup spinach 2 leaves romaine 1 medium pear 1/2 medium frozen banana 1 medium lemon, peeled 1 cup filtered water   Source: The Juice Generation: 100 Recipes for Fresh Juices and Superfood Smoothies     When Dallyn Pavey felt a few extra pounds settling onto her petite 5-foot-1-inch frame, the King of Prussia-based restaurant publicist turned to juicing to get back into balance.
FOOD
November 7, 1990 | By Libby Goldstein, Special to the Daily News
Bobbi Katz has been making her incredibly good hummus for nearly 20 years, but instead of stirring up a batch to take to a party, she's making it in vats these days. And sending it to supermarkets. Harriet's Favorite Hummus, which won a Philadelphia Magazine "Best of Philly" award this year, is not your traditional, find-it-in-any-veggie- cookbook hummus. Sure it has lots of chickpeas, garlic, fresh-squeezed lemon juice and a little olive oil . . . but there's also ginseng in it. And it's missing tahini - sesame seed butter - which means it's lower in fat than many other hummus recipes and more lemony tasting.
FOOD
April 15, 1992 | By Marcia Cone and Thelma Snyder, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Greek food is something that often comes to mind during the Easter season. The elaborate pageants held at many Greek Orthodox churches, followed by a joyous lamb feast, are all intriguing. But down through the centuries, during the seven weeks of Lent, those of the Greek Orthodox faith were forbidden to eat any animal product - meat, fish, eggs, butter, milk and cheese. The practice came about so that the believer might abstain from food containing blood or any food product derived from one having blood.
FOOD
October 22, 1986 | By NETTIE DUFFIELD, Special to the Daily News
Every once in a while I get a yen for veal, and when I doll amounts for one-person servings, I generally buy four chops and cook two very different meals. I like to use the chops, flattened and minus bone, for the breaded dish so I can save the bones for the next day's meal, giving the rice dish extra flavor. TARRAGON VEAL CUTLETS 2 small veal chops, about 1/2 inch thick, or 1 large veal cutlet 1 small egg 1/3 cup seasoned bread crumbs 2 teaspoons dry tarragon, crushed 1/4 teaspoon garlic salt 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground pepper Butter or oil for frying 1/2 lemon, cut into two wedges If using veal chops, remove meat from bone and reserve bones in refrigerator for future use. Pound meat between two sheets of waxed paper until flattened.
FOOD
February 8, 1989 | By Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Bali, the traveler's crown jewel of Indonesia, is a tiny dot in a string of tropical islands between the Java Sea and the Indian Ocean. Its palm-fringed hillsides are carved into rice paddy terraces that mirror the sky in the bright sunshine. Not the least of Bali's charms is its food, a conflagration of spices, truly a paradise for chili-lovers! The diet's mainstay is rice - they grow three crops a year - augmented by wonderful tropical fruits, vegetables and other foods. Balinese-style cooking is easily adapted to American kitchens, and beef is included in the recipes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1998 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Wallace Shawn doesn't want you to have a good time at the theater. He doesn't want you to leave feeling entertained, or instructed, or purged, or uplifted, or validated, or anything else that might suggest that a play of his did anything other than pose a vital question. He would be quite happy, though, if you left feeling honked off - at either the ideas in his play or the method by which they're presented. That would mean you paid attention. Shawn is a moralist masquerading as a playwright, a man who believes that if audiences are to respond to the theater's only legitimate purpose, which is to help us understand our world and cure its ills, they must be disabused of the idea that the playwright can do their work for them.
FOOD
October 18, 2007 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
In One-Bowl Meals (Ryland, Peters & Small, $12.95), British food editor Tonia George offers just 28 recipes, but every one is a temptation. George combines simplified style with basic ingredients and creative twists - as in deep-fried eggs or a grappa-laced three-cheese risotto. Her recipes are different enough to pique jaded taste buds, yet familiar enough to fall in most comfort zones, such as these lamb chops with lemon-mint marinade and cumin served with mashed chickpeas and roasted tomatoes.
FOOD
March 1, 1989 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
It's a jungle in there. Rummaging through the underbrush in the inner reaches of a refrigerator, one can capture a miniature menagerie of lemon bits and onion fragments, a tad of tomato paste, a lonely anchovy or a solitary sardine. Perhaps a half-eaten container of yogurt or a deserted celery stalk. Beneath veils of plastic wrap and shields of foil hide the remnants of bygone recipes, destined either for disposal or resurrection. The choice is yours. We vote for resurrection.
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | Craig LaBan
Just in case you've burned a few carbs during that brisk bike ride along Kelly Drive, Arthur Cavaliere's In Riva awaits in East Falls — cafe windows swung open to the riverside terrace; Italian birras flowing; pizza oven ablaze with wood logs — to help replace a few carbs with some Neapolitan pies. The oven was burning a little too hot on our brunch visit (too many flaking char spots) and the sauce was a bit sweet for my taste. But Cavaliere, a longtime Starr and Garces vet who also worked at Central Michel Richard in D.C., is clearly still a good cook.
FOOD
January 20, 2011 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
  After three years, a crippling recession, and an armed robbery, Under the Oak Cafe in East Oak Lane is more than enduring - it is expanding, with Saturday morning cooking classes, Friday night gourmet dinners, and a newly hired, French-trained chef. The cafe, opened in 2008 by the husband-and-wife team of Robert and Kelly McShain Tyree, plus Kelly's brother, Devitt McShain, sits on an isolated street with almost no foot traffic. "It was definitely a risk. People told us we were crazy to open here," says Kelly Tyree, who was raised in East Oak Lane and lives there still.
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