CollectionsLentils
IN THE NEWS

Lentils

FEATURED ARTICLES
FOOD
January 29, 1995 | By Colleen Pierre, FOR THE INQUIRER
If you're looking for a hearty but low-fat lunch, try lentils. They're a modern miracle health food as old as the hills. Probably the first cultivated legumes, lentils have been grown for food since 7000 B.C., according to food historians. Lentils are the most digestible of all the legumes, and the easiest to prepare. Unlike most beans, lentils don't have to be soaked, and can be cooked, from scratch, in just 15 to 20 minutes. Health benefits abound. Just one cup of cooked lentils provides 232 calories, 18 grams of protein, 40 grams of carbohydrate, and only a trace of fat and sodium.
FOOD
February 14, 2013
Makes 8 to 10 servings 1 onion, peeled and    quartered 6 ounces (approximate-    ly 11 slices) bacon or    pancetta Small handful fresh    parsley 1 clove garlic, peeled 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 cups lentils, brown or    green, rinsed 14-ounce can diced    tomatoes, plus 12/3    cups cold water to    rinse out 2 bay leaves 21/2 quarts chicken or ...
FOOD
November 3, 2011 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
This is an excerpt from Maureen Fitzgerald's cooking blog, "My Daughter's Kitchen. " Lentil soup is one of those staples you can turn to as the weather turns chilly. If you have a few basics on hand, this is a soup you can throw together, with a soothing, hearty result. It comes with a punch of protein without the heaviness of meat. It's exactly the kind of recipe I'm trying to pass along to my daughter - easy, healthy, and cheap - for the cooking blog we have started.
FOOD
March 22, 1992 | By Leslie Land, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Leg of pork can be trimmed so that there's very little fat. And the salt in hams that have been cured can be balanced by using unsalted accompaniments. Still, pork and roast ham remain on most nutritionists' "out" lists. Not only are they singled out as heart-health no-nos, they are also quite expensive - if, that is, you get a ham worth bothering with. Fortunately for ham lovers, health and the pocketbook can be addressed by using small amounts of ham for flavoring. And you can get those small amounts from butchers' leftovers, also known as ends.
FOOD
December 6, 2012
The old and the new At the lovingly restored Shane Confectionery in Old City, the Berley brothers still offer the classic buttercreams and clear toys that Philadelphians count on for the holidays, but they've also introduced several newbies. There's seasonal items like giant peppermint marshmallows dipped in dark chocolate and artisanal peppermint bark, and then year-round wonders like the Whirly Berley Bars: salted caramel and dark chocolate nougat enrobed in dark chocolate, sprinkled with cocoa nibs.
FOOD
January 8, 1986 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
Starting the New Year with some sort of bean dish is a tradition in many countries. The belief is usually related to wealth rather than health. In the north of Italy it would be tempting the fates not to eat lentils on New Year's Day. The Italians believe that the tiny beans bring good fortune. However, if you want to stick around to enjoy your good luck, it's best not to make bean eating a once-a-year event. High in natural fiber and fat- free vegetable protein, beans are a healthy meat-stretcher or substitute.
FOOD
January 30, 2002 | By Aliza Green FOR THE INQUIRER
I'm here to "spill the beans" about wonderful bean soups that are both easy and inexpensive to make. Bean soup may be the homiest - and even homeliest - dish you can think of, but there are so many versions that you'll never get bored. Satisfying, inexpensive and filling, bean soup will taste just as good, if not better, after a few days of mellowing. In cold weather, I make a different kind of bean soup every weekend to keep on hand for lunch or a quick supper. Because the soups freeze so beautifully, I almost always make a double recipe and freeze half.
FOOD
November 25, 1992 | By Sharon MacKenzie, FOR THE INQUIRER
On the day before Thanksgiving, virtually everyone in America is focused on the great traditional feast to come, when it's almost a patriotic duty to eat too much of our updated versions of the Pilgrims' foods. But if you're in the mood for a complete change of pace, here's a simple, very basic kind of Thanksgiving eve alternative to the elaborate holiday fare. This month's four-person menu consists of soup, salad, bread and candied fruit, all made from supermarket ingredients - except for the red wine - and generally easy to prepare.
FOOD
August 31, 2006 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the Philadelphia area, restaurants are rethinking menus, shopkeepers are worrying over stock, and Indian customers, always in search of a bargain, are grumbling. The price of dals - the lentils of various hues that are essential to any proper Indian diet - has skyrocketed in the United States recently, since India stopped exporting them due to a shortage there. The ban has pushed prices two to four or more times higher in this region; in other parts of the country, supplies are short.
FOOD
December 27, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
We had a lot on our plates for our final cooking class at Bayard Taylor Elementary in North Philadelphia, especially for fifth-grade cooks: We were preparing dinner for their families, cooking the favorite recipes from the ones they had learned. Each of the five children had invited two guests. At least that was the plan. Somehow, we ended up with three younger siblings in the kitchen: Kareema Brown's younger sister, Kiara, 10, and the little brother and sister of Yariel Fernandez, Bryan, 9, and Yarianna, 7. And Bryan, a high-energy boy, was already running laps around the prep area.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
December 27, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
We had a lot on our plates for our final cooking class at Bayard Taylor Elementary in North Philadelphia, especially for fifth-grade cooks: We were preparing dinner for their families, cooking the favorite recipes from the ones they had learned. Each of the five children had invited two guests. At least that was the plan. Somehow, we ended up with three younger siblings in the kitchen: Kareema Brown's younger sister, Kiara, 10, and the little brother and sister of Yariel Fernandez, Bryan, 9, and Yarianna, 7. And Bryan, a high-energy boy, was already running laps around the prep area.
FOOD
December 13, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
'This looks like fish food," said Mark Ramirez, when he opened the bag of lentils we would be using to make soup. "Or the stuff you feed the ducks at the zoo. " None of the fifth graders in the cooking class at Bayard Taylor Elementary School in North Philadelphia had ever had lentils. "Do they taste like peas?" Kareema Brown asked. "Not really," I said. "They don't really have a strong taste, they take on the flavor of the things they're cooked with. But they are so good for you - full of protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals.
FOOD
February 14, 2013
Makes 8 to 10 servings 1 onion, peeled and    quartered 6 ounces (approximate-    ly 11 slices) bacon or    pancetta Small handful fresh    parsley 1 clove garlic, peeled 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 cups lentils, brown or    green, rinsed 14-ounce can diced    tomatoes, plus 12/3    cups cold water to    rinse out 2 bay leaves 21/2 quarts chicken or ...
FOOD
December 6, 2012
The old and the new At the lovingly restored Shane Confectionery in Old City, the Berley brothers still offer the classic buttercreams and clear toys that Philadelphians count on for the holidays, but they've also introduced several newbies. There's seasonal items like giant peppermint marshmallows dipped in dark chocolate and artisanal peppermint bark, and then year-round wonders like the Whirly Berley Bars: salted caramel and dark chocolate nougat enrobed in dark chocolate, sprinkled with cocoa nibs.
FOOD
December 22, 2011 | By Alison Ladman, Associated Press
Consider offering something that is richly savory, but won't weigh down the party this holiday season. We started with a beautiful side of salmon, roasted it with butter and garlic, then dressed it with a warm lentil salad spiked with citrus and pomegranate. The result is a beautiful dish that will make a statement. If you can't find creme fraiche, substitute sour cream or Greek-style yogurt.   Roasted Salmon With Warm Lentil Salad Makes 10 servings 2 cups green lentils 4-pound side of salmon, skin on 1 clove garlic, finely minced 2 tablespoons butter Salt and ground black pepper Zest and juice of 1 lemon Segments of 3 oranges Seeds of 1/2 pomegranate 1 teaspoon ground coriander 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro Splash of hot sauce 8-ounce tub creme fraiche Juice of 1 orange 1. Heat the oven to 400 degrees.
FOOD
November 3, 2011 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
This is an excerpt from Maureen Fitzgerald's cooking blog, "My Daughter's Kitchen. " Lentil soup is one of those staples you can turn to as the weather turns chilly. If you have a few basics on hand, this is a soup you can throw together, with a soothing, hearty result. It comes with a punch of protein without the heaviness of meat. It's exactly the kind of recipe I'm trying to pass along to my daughter - easy, healthy, and cheap - for the cooking blog we have started.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2011 | By LARI ROEBLING, For the Daily News
DAHLIA OSMAN had a dream - to leave corporate life and open a small cafe. Two-and-a-half years ago, that dream became a reality in Mazag Cafe, on 10th Street in the Italian Market. The Egyptian native was formerly an account manager in fiber communications, an experience she says prepared her to own a restaurant by teaching her financial skills and the ability to deal with unexpected problems. Osman says mazag means "good mood" in Arabic. In general that's what you'll find here.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2007 | By LARI ROBLING For the Daily News
The food-a-razzi, those diners who race to the newest place ready to proclaim it a hallowed haunt or a dud, have been quick to swarm Queen Village's Cochon. This barely month-old BYOB newbie already has "reservations only" on most weekends and it's getting tougher to get a seat on weekdays. Lately there's been much said about the Philadelphia dining scene becoming too many husband-and-wife duos opening one BYOB after another with little innovation. That may be a fair comment, and it will be interesting to see where chef/owner Gene Giuffi and co-owner Amy Giuffi take the fledgling Cochon.
FOOD
August 31, 2006 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the Philadelphia area, restaurants are rethinking menus, shopkeepers are worrying over stock, and Indian customers, always in search of a bargain, are grumbling. The price of dals - the lentils of various hues that are essential to any proper Indian diet - has skyrocketed in the United States recently, since India stopped exporting them due to a shortage there. The ban has pushed prices two to four or more times higher in this region; in other parts of the country, supplies are short.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2004 | By CATHERINE LUCEY luceyc@phillynews.com Associated Press and Daily News wire services contributed to this report. Catherine Lucey is filling in for Howard Gensler, who is on vacation
AFTER TWO days of searches at the Neverland ranch, authorities took a DNA sample from Michael Jackson, a newspaper reported yesterday. Investigators used a cotton swab to take the sample from inside Jackson's mouth on Saturday, the Santa Barbara News-Press reported, citing unidentified sources. The move came as police searched Neverland again on Friday and Saturday. The pop star's trial is scheduled to begin Jan. 31. Jackson, 46, has pleaded not guilty to child molestation, conspiracy and administering an intoxicating agent - alcohol - to the alleged victim.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|