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Lentils

FOOD
January 30, 2002 | By Aliza Green FOR THE INQUIRER
I'm here to "spill the beans" about wonderful bean soups that are both easy and inexpensive to make. Bean soup may be the homiest - and even homeliest - dish you can think of, but there are so many versions that you'll never get bored. Satisfying, inexpensive and filling, bean soup will taste just as good, if not better, after a few days of mellowing. In cold weather, I make a different kind of bean soup every weekend to keep on hand for lunch or a quick supper. Because the soups freeze so beautifully, I almost always make a double recipe and freeze half.
FOOD
May 28, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
More fruits, vegetables and salads are being introduced into the diet as people are reducing the amount of meat they eat - and, in many cases, doing away with meat completely. Vegetarians eat no meat in any form; vegans, or "pure vegetarians," eliminate dairy products as well. This always brings up the question, "Where do you get your protein?" There are many sources of protein in the plant kingdom. Nuts, peanut butter, tofu and legumes are all excellent sources of protein.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
For Kishan Singh, life began in 1981, when he arrived in the United States from northern India and worked at Windows of the World, on the 107th floor of Manhattan's World Trade Center. As a busboy he was only on the first level of his chosen profession, but he liked the view. And it was apparent his supervisors liked what they saw, because it wasn't long before Singh became a waiter. And when he left Windows, in 1988, he had been promoted to captain. "I liked the business very much and then opened my first restaurant, in Albany.
FOOD
May 26, 1999 | by Beverly Mills with Alicia Ross,For the Daily News
Since we first raved a few months ago about how quickly red lentils cook, we've received several letters from readers who love them. "Red lentils are a great addition to the Desperate pantry," they say, "only now we need some new recipes. " The good news is that you can substitute red for brown lentils in your own recipes for salads, soups or stews, so long as you take into consideration the shorter cooking time. The red lentil cooks to perfection in just nine to 10 minutes because it's a little smaller than a brown lentil and doesn't have an outer layer, called a seed coat.
FOOD
January 8, 1997 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! I had the best lentil soup at Ozzie's. Would you get me the recipe? Diana D'Angelo Philadelphia Dear Diana, The recipe follows, but first a few words about Ozzie Gallelli, the owner/chef for 22 years at Ozzie's Trattoria, in South Philadelphia. Gallelli and his cousin, Toto Schiavone, owner of DiLullo's, came over from Calabria, in southern Italy, to work at the old Pavio's in the Northeast. Gallelli started out as a busboy. Even though he now owns his own place, he's still a hands-on cook.
FOOD
January 29, 1995 | By Colleen Pierre, FOR THE INQUIRER
If you're looking for a hearty but low-fat lunch, try lentils. They're a modern miracle health food as old as the hills. Probably the first cultivated legumes, lentils have been grown for food since 7000 B.C., according to food historians. Lentils are the most digestible of all the legumes, and the easiest to prepare. Unlike most beans, lentils don't have to be soaked, and can be cooked, from scratch, in just 15 to 20 minutes. Health benefits abound. Just one cup of cooked lentils provides 232 calories, 18 grams of protein, 40 grams of carbohydrate, and only a trace of fat and sodium.
FOOD
June 22, 1994 | By Marie Simmons, FOR THE INQUIRER
Feeding a crowd doesn't have to mean hours of shopping, prepping and cooking. Just last week, I invited 10 people for a birthday supper. Everyone loved the food. All the dishes were prepared ahead of time and arranged on platters. By meal time, I was cool as a cucumber and the kitchen was as neat as a pin. If time and weather conditions require that the dishes be refrigerated, make sure to bring them to room temperature before serving. Refrigeration can flatten flavors, so taste each dish and add more seasonings if needed.
FOOD
November 25, 1992 | By Sharon MacKenzie, FOR THE INQUIRER
On the day before Thanksgiving, virtually everyone in America is focused on the great traditional feast to come, when it's almost a patriotic duty to eat too much of our updated versions of the Pilgrims' foods. But if you're in the mood for a complete change of pace, here's a simple, very basic kind of Thanksgiving eve alternative to the elaborate holiday fare. This month's four-person menu consists of soup, salad, bread and candied fruit, all made from supermarket ingredients - except for the red wine - and generally easy to prepare.
FOOD
March 22, 1992 | By Leslie Land, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Leg of pork can be trimmed so that there's very little fat. And the salt in hams that have been cured can be balanced by using unsalted accompaniments. Still, pork and roast ham remain on most nutritionists' "out" lists. Not only are they singled out as heart-health no-nos, they are also quite expensive - if, that is, you get a ham worth bothering with. Fortunately for ham lovers, health and the pocketbook can be addressed by using small amounts of ham for flavoring. And you can get those small amounts from butchers' leftovers, also known as ends.
FOOD
September 4, 1991 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
The Greeks are philosophic about nearly everything, including their food. Dining in Greece is both worldly and spiritual, and frequently a culinary excursion into the fields of art and science. Rosemary Barron, a long-time student of the culture and a teacher and lecturer on the country's cuisine, does an excellent job of capturing the Greek love affair with food in Flavors of Greece (William Morrow, $25). Her book takes you from the ancient gardens of Crete to the tiny tavernas scattered about today's countryside.
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