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Leon Huff

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NEWS
June 10, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
'Gamble-Huff-Bell Music. " The first two names listed on the sign above the doorway at the Philadelphia International Records offices at 309 S. Broad St. are those most closely associated with the sophisticated soul music that became universally known as "The Sound of Philadelphia" in the late 1960s and early 1970s. But there were more than two major players writing the Philadelphia chapter in the great American soul-music history books. Along with Philadelphia International Records owners Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff, there was also Thom Bell, the producer, arranger, and songwriter known for the delectably sweet music he made with the Delfonics and the Stylistics.
NEWS
February 13, 1986 | BY PATTI LABELLE
The Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame should be here because of the "Philly Sound" and Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff and Dick Clark and "Bandstand" and Chubby Checker and Bobby Rydell and Teddy Pendergrass and the Blue Notes and Fabian and Frankie Avalon and Dee Dee Sharp and Kal Rudman and Mike Douglas and steaks and pretzels and hoagies and when they're through with that stuff, they can come to Patti LaBelle's house for fried chicken.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1997 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of spectators seated inside a concert hall at the Convention Center one night last week swayed to the music and lip-synched the words to a Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes' hit being performed on stage: If you don't know me by now, you will never, never, never know me. Oooooouuu. That just may be Bernie Wilson's greatest fear. As Harold Melvin's Blue Notes stepped and sang the legendary 1970s-era "If You Don't Know Me By Now," a band of protesters demonstrated on the street on behalf of three men who say they immortalized the ballad.
NEWS
July 4, 2003 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Safa Alston threw her head back, took a big gulp of air, and belted out a sultry, soulful "thank you," stretching out the vowels as if her vocal cords were made of Silly Putty, after she won the It's a Wrap singing contest last night. Dressed in a red tank top and a white-and-black polka-dot skirt with a tulle lining peeking out from under it, the 20-year-old Mount Airy resident tearfully accepted the prize, which includes a chance to record with Philadelphia International Records.
NEWS
July 1, 2008 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Kenny Gamble and Patti LaBelle have collaborated on "I Am an American," a patriotic recording that will be played during the Welcome America! celebration on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway on Friday. Gamble, the cofounder of Philadelphia International Records who recently was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame with his partner Leon Huff, produced the adaptation of the song that was originally conceived by Father Divine, founder of the International Peace Mission Movement.
NEWS
April 22, 2003
KENNY GAMBLE is just like every other South Philly guy who ever sold a mainline mansion to move back into his old rowhouse block and invest $5 million and the rest of his life recreating the nurturing neighborhood he grew up in. Okay, so there's only one guy like that. But one may be enough. Because what started as a dream grew into a vision then an obsession and now a comprehensive plan. Universal Companies, the amalgam of enterprises Gamble runs from an office near his boyhood home, is intimately involved in every aspect of the commercial and civic life of his old neighborhood.
NEWS
September 11, 2010 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
What are Teddy Pendergrass and Tammi Terrell doing on a show about underappreciated musical stars? Four thousand people turned out to mourn and celebrate Teddy Pendergrass at Philadelphia's Enon Tabernacle Baptist Church after he died Jan. 13. With that many fans at his funeral alone, and eight gold or platinum albums, he nonetheless turns up on the season premiere of Unsung Monday at 10 p.m. on cable's TV One. (Comcast Channel 75 in...
NEWS
December 28, 2010 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard Wilson, 64, who helped define the Sound of Philadelphia as a longtime member of Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes, died Sunday. Mr. Wilson, a North Philadelphia native, was part of the classic lineup during the early and mid-1970s that was responsible for such hits as "If You Don't Know Me by Now," "The Love I Lost," "Don't Leave Me This Way," and "Bad Luck. " He was the flashiest member, recalled Lloyd Parks, at 61 the last surviving member of the group that rose to fame under the legendary producers Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huff.
NEWS
September 13, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
PHILADELPHIA music devotees will want to circle Oct. 24 on the calendar, the day the Philadelphia Music Alliance unveils nine new bronze plaques on Broad Street's musical Walk of Fame. Typical of such "lifetime achievement" awards, the honorees don't always survive to enjoy the occasion. The death last week of music producer, arranger and composer Bobby Martin will diminish the ranks accepting for the Philadelphia International Records' "house band," MFSB, collectively one of this year's Walk of Fame inductees.
NEWS
March 25, 1997 | By Kevin L. Carter and Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Harold Melvin, the singer who led the R&B group the Blue Notes and fostered the talent of Teddy Pendergrass, died yesterday morning at his Chestnut Hill home. Mr. Melvin, 57, was surrounded by a large contingent of family and friends, said a daughter, Trudy. "I'm glad he is at peace," she said. "But I'm sorry that he's not here with us anymore. " Mr. Melvin had been ill since suffering a stroke in July. Bedridden and unable to speak, he was hospitalized from October until February, when his family asked that he be allowed to return home.
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NEWS
September 13, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BOBBY MARTIN was known as the "Grandaddy of R&B and soul," which meant he was the grandaddy of the Philadelphia Sound. Bobby worked with Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff, founders of Philadelphia International Records, to arrange and produce some of the greatest hits of the 1960s and '70s, as well as with some of the legendary musicians of that era. Robert L. "Bobby" Martin died last Friday. He was 82 and had been living in Hollywood, Calif., since 1980. "He was the greatest arranger," Gamble and Huff said in a statement.
NEWS
September 13, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
PHILADELPHIA music devotees will want to circle Oct. 24 on the calendar, the day the Philadelphia Music Alliance unveils nine new bronze plaques on Broad Street's musical Walk of Fame. Typical of such "lifetime achievement" awards, the honorees don't always survive to enjoy the occasion. The death last week of music producer, arranger and composer Bobby Martin will diminish the ranks accepting for the Philadelphia International Records' "house band," MFSB, collectively one of this year's Walk of Fame inductees.
NEWS
June 10, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
'Gamble-Huff-Bell Music. " The first two names listed on the sign above the doorway at the Philadelphia International Records offices at 309 S. Broad St. are those most closely associated with the sophisticated soul music that became universally known as "The Sound of Philadelphia" in the late 1960s and early 1970s. But there were more than two major players writing the Philadelphia chapter in the great American soul-music history books. Along with Philadelphia International Records owners Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff, there was also Thom Bell, the producer, arranger, and songwriter known for the delectably sweet music he made with the Delfonics and the Stylistics.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
A BIG BLAST of Philly's past, a couple of high-profile duds and more buzz-worthy album releases from the "four corners of the earth" grab our ears this week. A LANDMARK DATE: In just its first year out of the gate, backed by the music giant CBS, Philadelphia International Records had already scored a handful of hit singles, including Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes' "I Miss You," the O'Jays' "Backstabbers" and Billy Paul's "Me and Mrs. Jones. " But most of the men and women toiling at CBS's "Black Rock" HQ in New York and at the music giant's 21 branch offices hadn't really connected with these talents.
NEWS
August 15, 2011
South Philly native Kenny Gamble, a Lifetime Achievement Grammy winner and cofounder of Philadelphia International Records, turned 68 last week. Gamble, creator of the R&B music style "Philly Sound," has for the last 18 years focused on community redevelopment and education through his nonprofit, Universal Cos. Inquirer staff writer Kia Gregory talked to Gamble about the music business, city schools, and the impact of so-called flash mobs. Question: Turning 68, what's one thing you've learned?
NEWS
December 28, 2010 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard Wilson, 64, who helped define the Sound of Philadelphia as a longtime member of Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes, died Sunday. Mr. Wilson, a North Philadelphia native, was part of the classic lineup during the early and mid-1970s that was responsible for such hits as "If You Don't Know Me by Now," "The Love I Lost," "Don't Leave Me This Way," and "Bad Luck. " He was the flashiest member, recalled Lloyd Parks, at 61 the last surviving member of the group that rose to fame under the legendary producers Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huff.
NEWS
September 11, 2010 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
What are Teddy Pendergrass and Tammi Terrell doing on a show about underappreciated musical stars? Four thousand people turned out to mourn and celebrate Teddy Pendergrass at Philadelphia's Enon Tabernacle Baptist Church after he died Jan. 13. With that many fans at his funeral alone, and eight gold or platinum albums, he nonetheless turns up on the season premiere of Unsung Monday at 10 p.m. on cable's TV One. (Comcast Channel 75 in...
LIVING
March 19, 2010 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
The desk is huge, handsome, and perfectly, absolutely clear. Not a single stray paper, not a file, not even a pen rests on it. Yet this desk is in the working home office of an extremely busy man. Leon Huff admits it - he's a neat freak, and it shows in his elegant Moorestown home, a place so immaculate it's hard to imagine anyone even lives in it. The music producer and his wife, Regina, have created a world of striking furnishings, color...
NEWS
February 24, 2010 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Waterlogged gold records - Teddy Pendergrass' Heaven Only Knows, Lou Rawls' Unmistakably Lou - lay amid rubble in the offices of Philadelphia International Records yesterday while McFadden and Whitehead's "Ain't No Stoppin' Us Now" played on a boom box. Fire officials ruled yesterday that the Sunday morning blaze, which started in a stockroom, had been set but declined to release any other information. The fire severely damaged the brick building on South Broad Street where the Sound of Philadelphia was born.
NEWS
February 24, 2010 | By STEPHANIE FARR, farrs@phillynews.com 215-854-4225
Once when Stevie Wonder was recording at Philadelphia International Records, he called Leon Huff to his side to share a feeling. "He said to me: 'Somebody else is in this building besides us,' " Huff said. "And I knew exactly what he meant. " Speaking publicly for the first time since the Sunday blaze that heavily damaged the Center City building where he and producing partner Kenny Gamble created the Sound of Philadelphia, Huff said he got that feeling once again when he'd heard the studio had escaped relatively unscathed.
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