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Leonard Cohen

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1988 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
In Paris and Rome, Athens and Madrid, Leonard Cohen is considered one of North America's greatest pop artists. The noted German director Rainer Werner Fassbinder scored several films with his music. In Krakow, Poland, a festival is held annually in Cohen's honor, his works are widely distributed via homemade tapes and translated mimeographed copies, and when the man himself shows up to perform, there's a near-riot at the concert hall gates. "The last time I was there, it took several hours just to admit and seat people, because there were four strains of counterfeit tickets circulating in the city," Cohen says.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
This review originally appeared March 31 in coverage of the Philadelphia Film Festival. Poet, novelist, songwriter and fabled Romeo (a 1977 album, produced by Phil Spector of all people, is called Death of a Ladies' Man), Leonard Cohen emerged from the same '60s folk scene that spawned Bob Dylan and Joni Mitchell, the same '60s Beat era that spawned Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac. But Cohen, a Montrealer, always stood apart. He wore suits. He didn't sing, he croaked. He seemed older (he was - he's 71 now)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1988 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the interests of critical honesty, it must be admitted that I was three- quarters sold on Leonard Cohen's new album, I'm Your Man (Columbia ), on the basis of the cover alone: the perennially dour Cohen, his eyes masked by large sunglasses, pondering the fate of romance - while solemnly chomping on a banana. Inside, the music suggests a similarly sneaky sense of humor: cooing female backup singers reiterate Cohen's froggy assertions and shaggy-dog non sequiturs, and occasionally the poet even gets off a good melody ("Ain't No Cure for Love," "I'm Your Man," "Tower of Song")
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Poet, novelist, songwriter and fabled Romeo (a 1977 album, produced by Phil Spector of all people, is called Death of a Ladies' Man), Leonard Cohen emerged from the same '60s folk scene that spawned Bob Dylan and Joni Mitchell, the same '60s Beat era that spawned Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac. But Cohen, a Montrealer, always stood apart. He wore suits. He didn't sing, he croaked. He seemed older (he was - he's 71 now). And his songs ("Suzanne," "Sisters of Mercy," "Chelsea Hotel")
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1988 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Leonard Cohen, one of pop's most respected songwriters, is talking about Bob Dylan, another of pop's great songwriters: "We were sitting after one of his concerts in Europe having coffee, trading lyrics. He mentioned a song I'd written but not yet recorded called "Hallelujah. " He asked how long it took to write. I said a year and a half. "So the conversation goes on, and I start talking about "I and I," a song that was on his current album (Infidels) at the time. I asked him the same question; he said: 'I wrote it in 15 minutes.
NEWS
May 13, 2009 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Leonard Cohen isn't quite as old as the Academy of Music, he just sounds like he is. On Tuesday, the 74-year-old Canadian song-poet put on a magnificent three-hour-show at the 152-year-old opera house that was filled with prayer-like intensity and easygoing grace, not to mention sartorial splendor, meticulous musicianship and as perfectly crisp a sound mix as I can ever recall hearing at a rock show. And the white-haired guy - who can look like an elderly gentleman begging for alms or a remarkably nimble and debonair cock of the walk, depending on whether he's holding his fedora over his heart or wearing it on his head - cracked a bunch of old guy jokes, too. "I haven't been this happy since the end of World War II," he dryly croaked in "Waiting for the Miracle," the elegantly stately song in which he sang, "the maestro says its Mozart, but it sounds like bubblegum," before gesturing toward the bust of the Austrian composer atop the Academy's proscenium arch.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
There is really no reason on earth why Jennifer Warnes' Famous Blue Raincoat: The Songs of Leonard Cohen (Cypress) should be the wonderful record it is. Consider the following. Warnes possesses a terrific voice - strong, dryly witty in its phrasing, coolly sexy in its tone - which in recent years she has most often employed in the service of truly drippy movie music. The best known of such projects is undoubtedly her duet with Joe Cocker, "Up Where We Belong" from An Officer and a Gentleman.
NEWS
May 14, 2009 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Leonard Cohen isn't quite as old as the Academy of Music. He just sounds like he is. On Tuesday, the 74-year-old Canadian song-poet put on a magnificent three-hour show at the 152-year-old opera house that was filled with prayer-like intensity and easygoing grace, not to mention sartorial splendor, meticulous musicianship, and as perfectly crisp a sound mix as I can ever recall hearing at a rock show. And the white-haired guy - who can look like an elderly gentleman begging for alms or a remarkably nimble and debonair cock of the walk, depending on whether he's holding his fedora over his heart or wearing it on his head - cracked a bunch of old-guy jokes, too. "I haven't been this happy since the end of World War II," he dryly croaked in "Waiting for the Miracle," the elegantly stately song in which he sang, "the maestro says it's Mozart, but it sounds like bubble gum," before gesturing toward the bust of the Austrian composer atop the Academy's proscenium arch.
NEWS
July 15, 1993 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
While many singer/songwriters flatter themselves as being "tortured artists," Leonard Cohen has clearly lived the life - with the serious, enduring, important work to prove it. Making a rare appearance at the Keswick Theater tonight, he sings songs that function in popular forms - dance groove, Euro cabaret, country and western, as well as more esoteric Greek and Hebraic styles - while transcending the humdrum norms. Songs such as his seductive "Suzanne," angel-of-death-calling "Who by Fire," bittersweet "So Long Marianne," brutal "Partisan," struggling-for- freedom "Bird on the Wire" and bemused "Ain't No Cure for Love" are dark yet luminescent.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | By Mike Schurman, David Johnston and William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
Debra Kim Cohen, a frequent gambler whom five casinos supplied with liquor even though she was a teenager, was arrested for underage gambling yesterday morning at a Trump Plaza Hotel & Casino blackjack table, City Prosecutor Steven W. Smoger said. Smoger said the former Miss Ventnor contestant was booked and released on her own recognizance. Cohen, 20, cannot legally gamble in a casino before Feb. 8, when she turns 21. The terms of her probation following conviction last year on a previous misdemeanor underage gambling charge also barred her from casinos and mandated her attendance at Gamblers Anonymous meetings.
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NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
With its tattered gilt and vintage beer-'n'-booze signage, Bob & Barbara's Lounge on South Street looks fabulously tacky. Every second and fourth Wednesday, Philadelphia's Wallace Brothers band - twin singing multi-instrumentalists Zach and Colby - hosts Country Night. All participants are asked to wear cowboy hats and any Western ephemera they can muster. "It gets pretty colorful in there," says Zach Wallace. This Saturday, everyone will don a Dakota, a Tommy Bahama, or a Bonanza Felt for the first Philadelphia Country Music Festival at B&B's.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
April Fools' Day was just the right time for Josh Tillman's caustic alter ego, Father John Misty, to sell out Union Transfer. He even played up to the occasion by singing his first song - a hammy and richly lustrous "I Love You, Honeybear" - then exiting the stage with a "good night" and lights up. "That was a nice trick," he said later in the evening. Whether regaling the crowd with dry, sardonic wit; finger-pointing nightclub shtick; self-deprecating lyrics; or mock disgust (as in his cosmopolitan/countryish "The Night Josh Tillman Came to Our Apartment," which did all these at once)
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
WHEN ERIN Dickins eats steak frites , she always thinks of Leonard Cohen. Dickins, a founding member of the Manhattan Transfer, was playing a festival gig in Paris with the vocal group and the storied poet/songwriter in 1974. Afterward, Cohen directed them to a little bistro off the Champs Elysees, and she tried the French classic - topped with butter, but of course. "I've loved it ever since," said Dickins, who divides her time between homes in Phoenixville and on the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
July 28, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Older but hopefully not too terribly wiser, Time for Three has landed. Fourteen years since its casual beginnings at the Curtis Institute, the string trio now has the major recording deal of its dreams, and (the members hope) the kind of support that knows how to showcase a classically trained bluegrassy trio with ever-evolving taste for musical fusion. Perhaps the most dramatic evolution yet is heard within seconds on the new album, titled Time for Three , with an added, strongly pulsating rhythm section.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | BY MARK OLSEN, Los Angeles Times
  LOS ANGELES - You've seen them, but not noticed them. You've heard them, but not listened to them. The new documentary "20 Feet From Stardom" shines a light away from center stage over to the world of female backup singers. Directed by Morgan Neville, the film looks most specifically at the lives and careers of six women - Darlene Love, Merry Clayton, Lisa Fischer, Tata Vega, Claudia Lennear and Judith Hill - who span generations of music and have worked with a broad spectrum of artists including the Rolling Stones, Michael Jackson, Phil Spector, Stevie Wonder, Sting and Ike and Tina Turner.
NEWS
May 5, 2013
More Than Just A Dream (Elektra **1/2) From Sharon Jones to J.C. Brooks to Mayer Hawthorne to Charles Bradley to Eli "Paperboy" Reed, indie labels and rock clubs are chock-full of retro-soul and R&B acts these days, offering varying degrees of stylish nostalgia and earnest emotionalism in an age when both can seem lacking. Until now, you would have counted Fitz & the Tantrums, the L.A. sextet fronted by Michael Fitzpatrick with the assistance of singer Noelle Scaggs, among them.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2012 | By Jonathan Valania, For The Inquirer
I have seen the future of the past, and his name is J.D. McPherson, a thirtysomething cuffed-denim Okie with lacquered hair, iron lungs, and a hound dog howl. McPherson and his gifted retro-rock posse recently released Signs & Signifiers , a bracing collection of tailfin rockabilly, rawboned R&B, and sultry moonstruck balladeering. It is hands-down the feel-good record of the year. McPherson's star has been rising steadily since. NPR and WXPN have taken up his cause, he'll be on the Late Show with David Letterman Dec. 4, and he sold out Johnny Brenda's almost as soon as the show was announced.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2012
FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE Jazz was one of America's first and most successful cultural exports to Russia during the Cold War era (thanks, Satchmo).  Enjoy the payback as the bold and brassy, 17-piece Moscow Jazz State Orchestra hits town after a four-night "warm-up" at Dizzy's Coca-Cola Room in New York. Former President (and occasional horn blower) Bill Clinton has hailed their frontman Igor Butman "my favorite saxophonist. " His arranging skills are exceptional, too. Chris' Jazz Café, 1421 Sansom St., 7 and 9 p.m. Tuesday, $15, 215-568-3131, chrisjazzcafe.com .   SOUNDS IN SILENCE The dark, cool diorama space at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University on Logan Square is a great refuge from the summer heat.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Lana Del Rey Born to Die ( Interscope ** ) If only it was as much fun to listen to Lana Del Rey as it is to argue about her. Since the singer born Lizzy Grant released her sultry, sumptuous, impossibly jaded and yet thoroughly romantic single "Video Games" last summer, the 25-year-old's carefully constructed persona has made her the focal point of an age-old authenticity debate. (Are those puffy lips real?) It also has added to the escalating hype for Born to Die (Interscope **)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
A BIG BLAST of Philly's past, a couple of high-profile duds and more buzz-worthy album releases from the "four corners of the earth" grab our ears this week. A LANDMARK DATE: In just its first year out of the gate, backed by the music giant CBS, Philadelphia International Records had already scored a handful of hit singles, including Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes' "I Miss You," the O'Jays' "Backstabbers" and Billy Paul's "Me and Mrs. Jones. " But most of the men and women toiling at CBS's "Black Rock" HQ in New York and at the music giant's 21 branch offices hadn't really connected with these talents.
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