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Leonard Weinglass

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NEWS
March 28, 2011
Leonard Weinglass, 77, a crusading lawyer who championed radical and liberal causes and clients in some of the most controversial trials of the 1960s and '70s, including the Chicago Seven and Pentagon Papers cases, died Wednesday of pancreatic cancer in New York. Mr. Weinglass developed a reputation as a firebrand during the Chicago Seven conspiracy case against anti-Vietnam War demonstrators at the 1968 Democratic National Convention. The defendants included Tom Hayden, Abbie Hoffman, and Jerry Rubin.
NEWS
March 25, 2011 | Associated Press
Leonard Weinglass was a modern-day Clarence Darrow, an attorney who defended people for their politics, not their alleged crimes, friends said. His clients included Mumia Abu-Jamal, the Philadelphia cop-killer who sparked crusades against the death penalty. He also represented the Chicago Seven in the 1960s and the so-called Cuban Five in recent years. Weinglass died Wednesday in New York City. He was 77 and had pancreatic cancer. "I always considered Lenny the modern-day Clarence Darrow," said Michael Krinsky, a partner at Rabinowittz, Boudin, Standard, Krinsky and Lieberman, where Weinglass worked.
NEWS
September 6, 1995 | By Julia Cass, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leonard Weinglass, the lead attorney in Mumia Abu-Jamal's death-sentence appeal, spent yesterday in a different role - as a witness in his client's lawsuit against the state prison system. Weinglass was called to testify about confidential legal mail he sent to his client in prison that was confiscated and copied by prison officials. Abu- Jamal, who is awaiting the death penalty for killing a Philadelphia police officer in 1981, contends in his lawsuit that prison officials copied the mail, blocked media access to him, and lodged disciplinary charges against him in retaliation for his radio commentaries and book.
NEWS
July 23, 1995 | By Marc Kaufman and Julia Cass, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The image of Philadelphia justice plays a central role in the belief of thousands of people across the United States and the world that death-row inmate Mumia Abu-Jamal is innocent and did not get a fair trial. The Philadelphia police who arrested him in 1981 had a reputation, acquired especially during the years in which Frank Rizzo was police commissioner and mayor, for toughness bordering on brutality. Even today, scores of drug convictions are being overturned because Philadelphia police officers planted evidence on innocent people, then lied about it in court.
NEWS
March 7, 2001
Few felons are as concerned about their public image as Mumia Abu-Jamal. From his commencement speeches delivered by tape recorder to his on-line and on-air antics, Abu-Jamal has done about as much as a convicted murderer can do to control his public persona and his story of being a "victim. " Even to the point of firing his legal team. Abu-Jamal, who says he's innocent of the shooting death of Officer Daniel Faulkner in 1981, wants to replace attorneys Daniel Williams and Leonard Weinglass because Williams is publishing an "inside account" of the case.
NEWS
October 27, 1999 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
Convicted cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal gets another Christmas, thanks to a federal court order stopping his scheduled execution on Dec. 2. U.S. District Judge William H. Yohn Jr. yesterday stayed Abu-Jamal's date with lethal injection 13 days after it was ordered by Gov. Ridge. Abu-Jamal, 45, is on death row for the 1981 murder of Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner. Yesterday's stay was expected. What happens next is lawyers for Abu-Jamal and the Philadelphia district attorney will file legal briefs with Yohn by Dec. 7. Yohn then will decide whether to hold hearings with witnesses or rule without hearings on federal issues raised by Abu-Jamal.
NEWS
October 3, 1996 | by Marisol Bello, Daily News Staff Writer
The second day of hearings in the Mumia Abu-Jamal murder case deteriorated into a daylong squabble between the judge and defense attorneys. Common Pleas Judge Albert F. Sabo spent much of yesterday challenging Abu-Jamal's lawyers, Leonard Weinglass and Daniel Williams. He refused to hear any objections and sided with the prosecutor on every issue. He often answered questions addressed to witnesses. And at one point, he called the testimony of a defense witness "baloney.
NEWS
November 22, 2001 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia judge turned aside yesterday a state court appeal for Mumia Abu-Jamal, the convicted police killer and author who has become an international cause celebre for death-penalty opponents. Common Pleas Court Judge Pamela Dembe ruled that the appeal filed in July by Abu-Jamal's new legal team did not fall within the deadlines set by the Pennsylvania legislature. She found that his appeal was not based on any new material facts discovered within the 60 days immediately before his petition was filed, as required by state law. Abu-Jamal, a former radio reporter, was convicted of the 1981 murder of Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner.
NEWS
October 14, 1999 | By Frederick Cusick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania Gov. Ridge yesterday signed a new death warrant for controversial police killer Mumia Abu-Jamal. The warrant, the second that Ridge has signed for the state's most famous death-row inmate in the last four years, sets Abu-Jamal's execution date for Dec. 2. However, a new appeal that Abu-Jamal's attorneys said they will file in federal court tomorrow is expected to cause the court to stay the warrant. Abu-Jamal's attorneys said their appeal, which is only the latest in almost two decades of legal and political controversy surrounding the inmate, will allege 29 constitutional violations in Abu-Jamal's trial and appeal.
NEWS
April 30, 1998 | By Sudarsan Raghavan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mumia Abu-Jamal for U.S. Senate? Some members of New York's Green Party say they'd like to see the former radio journalist, who was convicted of the 1981 murder of Philadelphia police officer Daniel Faulkner, run for office this year - from death row. On Tuesday, Mark Dunlea, the party's leader, sent a letter to New York state's Board of Elections asking whether Abu-Jamal, 43, can legally become the Greens' candidate against Sen. Alfonse D'Amato,...
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NEWS
March 28, 2011
Leonard Weinglass, 77, a crusading lawyer who championed radical and liberal causes and clients in some of the most controversial trials of the 1960s and '70s, including the Chicago Seven and Pentagon Papers cases, died Wednesday of pancreatic cancer in New York. Mr. Weinglass developed a reputation as a firebrand during the Chicago Seven conspiracy case against anti-Vietnam War demonstrators at the 1968 Democratic National Convention. The defendants included Tom Hayden, Abbie Hoffman, and Jerry Rubin.
NEWS
March 25, 2011 | Associated Press
Leonard Weinglass was a modern-day Clarence Darrow, an attorney who defended people for their politics, not their alleged crimes, friends said. His clients included Mumia Abu-Jamal, the Philadelphia cop-killer who sparked crusades against the death penalty. He also represented the Chicago Seven in the 1960s and the so-called Cuban Five in recent years. Weinglass died Wednesday in New York City. He was 77 and had pancreatic cancer. "I always considered Lenny the modern-day Clarence Darrow," said Michael Krinsky, a partner at Rabinowittz, Boudin, Standard, Krinsky and Lieberman, where Weinglass worked.
NEWS
August 27, 2009
ALMOST 30 years after Mumia Abu-Jamal murdered her husband, Maureen Faulkner has won the battle for justice on the domestic front. Now she's poised to triumph in the European theater as well. Earlier this year, the Supreme Court declined to hear Abu-Jamal's appeal for a new trial. The 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals in Philadelphia has upheld his conviction for the murder of Officer Danny Faulkner. In other words, Abu-Jamal will never get out of jail. The high court has yet to rule on a separate appeal on whether Abu-Jamal deserves a new sentencing hearing.
NEWS
December 27, 2001 | By Earl Ofari Hutchinson
It was a courageous ruling. On Dec. 18, U.S. District Court Judge William H. Yohn Jr. vacated the death sentence for Mumia Abu-Jamal and ordered the state either to conduct a new sentencing hearing or sentence Abu-Jamal to life imprisonment. Reaction was swift and predictable. Yohn's ruling was savagely denounced by the widow of slain Philadelphia police officer Daniel Faulkner; the Philadelphia Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 5, and Philadelphia District Attorney Lynne Abraham, who angrily declared within hours of the ruling that she would appeal.
NEWS
December 23, 2001 | By Nathan Gorenstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A judge's decision to overturn the death sentence of Mumia Abu-Jamal last week - leaving his conviction intact - initially angered both sides of the decades-old case. But although Abu-Jamal supporters are still fuming, one prominent foe of Abu-Jamal said that accepting a life sentence may now be the best resolution. A former defense lawyer for Abu-Jamal said he believed that legal realities - the prospect of unending litigation - ultimately will lead District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham to agree.
NEWS
November 22, 2001 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia judge turned aside yesterday a state court appeal for Mumia Abu-Jamal, the convicted police killer and author who has become an international cause celebre for death-penalty opponents. Common Pleas Court Judge Pamela Dembe ruled that the appeal filed in July by Abu-Jamal's new legal team did not fall within the deadlines set by the Pennsylvania legislature. She found that his appeal was not based on any new material facts discovered within the 60 days immediately before his petition was filed, as required by state law. Abu-Jamal, a former radio reporter, was convicted of the 1981 murder of Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner.
NEWS
September 13, 2001 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mumia Abu-Jamal's attorneys yesterday put a face on the mystery man they say confessed to murdering Police Officer Daniel Faulkner, releasing a seven-minute videotape of Arnold R. Beverly reading his 1999 affidavit. The videotape was filed in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia as part of Abu-Jamal's federal appeal, and it was released to reporters. It is the first public image of Beverly since Abu-Jamal's new legal team disclosed the affidavit in May. Beverly's affidavit contends that he, not Abu-Jamal, fatally shot Faulkner on Dec. 9, 1981, as part of a "mob hit" contracted by corrupt police officers and organized-crime figures angry at Faulkner for interfering in illegal gaming, drug dealing and prostitution in the area of 13th and Locust Streets.
NEWS
August 5, 2001 | By Monica Yant Kinney and Craig R. McCoy INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The main fund-raising organization for death-row inmate Mumia Abu-Jamal has been ordered to stop soliciting contributions in Pennsylvania, after failing to give a full accounting of its finances. In a letter released last week, the state faulted the International Concerned Family and Friends of Mumia Abu-Jamal for ignoring repeated demands to provide details of spending and fund-raising over the last decade. The state also criticized the nonprofit for missing filing deadlines to detail its current finances and for turning in an inadequate audit prepared by an unlicensed accountant, the state said.
NEWS
August 3, 2001 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After years in solitary confinement on death row in a Pittsburgh-area state prison, convicted police killer Mumia Abu-Jamal is scheduled to return to Philadelphia Aug. 17 to seek a new appeal in the state courts. Assistant U.S. Attorney Hugh Burns, an appeals lawyer representing the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, yesterday confirmed that Common Pleas Judge Pamela Pryor Dembe had ordered Abu-Jamal transferred from the Greene state prison in Waynesburg to Philadelphia for a status hearing.
NEWS
July 6, 2001 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Convicted police killer Mumia Abu-Jamal's new lawyers have asked a federal judge to suspend the appeal of his conviction and death sentence so they can mount a new legal challenge in the Pennsylvania courts. The petitions filed by Pittsburgh lawyer Marlene Kamish in U.S. District Court and Philadelphia Common Pleas Court signaled a change in direction for Abu-Jamal's defense and his new legal team's decision to make the old team's conduct a key issue in that defense. Kamish's petition said that she and her cocounsel "have uncovered an all-pervasive conflict of interest" by Abu-Jamal's former lawyers, Leonard Weinglass and Daniel R. Williams, that "infected their representation of [him]
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