CollectionsLeonardo
IN THE NEWS

Leonardo

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
Like an abandoned sci-fi movie prop, a stark white dome rises from the crazy quilt of farm fields and heavily wooded slopes along U.S. Route 22 here in Lehigh County. From the threshold of the futuristic studio built next to a soybean field, invited guests face the challenging stare of an 8-foot-high clay stallion model that is the embodiment of a 500-year-old dream. With his ears pricked forward, nostrils flared and lips parted as if about to protest the lengthy process of his creation, he is poised, waiting.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1992 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Leonardo da Vinci would have been a heck of a painter if he hadn't spent so much time designing buildings, inventing war machines, drawing maps and studying hydraulic engineering when he wasn't dabbling in music, mechanics, optics, geology and anatomy. Actually, "dabbling" makes Leonardo sound like a dilettante, which would be grossly unfair to the prototypical Renaissance Man (or Person). He stuck his fingers in all these disciplines because he wanted to know - indeed, he needed to know - how everything worked.
LIVING
October 28, 1996 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On top of the artistic masterpieces, the pioneering studies of human anatomy, and the inventions, Leonardo da Vinci did geology. In his 1508 manuscript, which went on display Saturday in New York City, he posited an idea remarkably similar to a modern environmental theory sometimes known as the Gaia hypothesis, which holds that the Earth functions like a living body. Leonardo called soil the Earth's flesh, rock strata its bones, tufa (volcanic stone) its cartilage, and water its blood.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1999 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Next Sunday, an Alitalia cargo plane is scheduled to leave Kennedy Airport in New York for Milan, carrying the fulfillment of a 21-year-old improbable dream - a 15-ton bronze horse that closes an incomplete chapter in the extraordinary life of Leonardo da Vinci. The massive sculpture is described as a gift from the American people - who no doubt would be surprised to learn they were involved - to the Italian city where Leonardo worked for many years. In fact, the 24-foot-tall horse, one of the largest of its kind ever made, is really a posthumous gift from Charles Dent of Fogelsville, Pa., near Allentown.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2013 | Reviewed by Michael D. Schaffer
Leonardo and the Last Supper By Ross King Walker. 322 pp. $28   Leonardo da Vinci was a genius of delay, a master of the unfinished. Brilliant ideas swirled around him like snowflakes in a flurry and melted almost as quickly. Frustrated patrons tried in vain to get him to complete commissions, but the perfectionist wouldn't be hurried. Unfinished work seemed to be a Leonardo specialty, and as the last decade of the 15th century dawned, he had frustratingly little to show for the prodigious talent he had displayed in his youth.
NEWS
November 21, 2001
It's a bridge too far, sure enough, but its reach is for ageless imagination and the willingness to take risks. What a fine walk near Oslo, Norway, it must be across the newly opened bridge based on the 16th-century design by Leonardo da Vinci. In 1502, Sultan Bajazet II commissioned the Renaissance man to design a structure to cross the Golden Horn, an inlet at the mouth of the Bosporus River in what is modern-day Turkey. Leonardo being Leonardo, he envisioned a stone bridge based on ridiculously innovative uses of art and physics.
NEWS
February 6, 2011 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The intricate designs on faded paper are the work of history's most celebrated Renaissance man, depicting flying machines, mechanical animals, artillery, and an odd musical instrument you'd never see in the Kimmel Center. Leonardo da Vinci did not actually build most of these marvels. Yet, five centuries later, a team of Italian scholars has managed to do so, taking the wooden creations to the Franklin Institute for an exhibit that opened Saturday. The Inquirer put Leonardo's work to the test, arranging for a sneak preview of the exhibit, "Leonardo da Vinci's Workshop," by two people well-qualified to evaluate it. Both are engineers at Drexel University and classically trained musicians.
SPORTS
July 6, 1994 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Tab Ramos will be sidelined for a minimum of two months with a slight skull fracture and could be out of action for up to six months, a spokesman for the U.S. World Cup soccer team said yesterday. Ramos, a 27-year-old midfielder from Hillside, N.J., was injured when he was elbowed by Leonardo during Brazil's 1-0 victory on Monday at Stanford Stadium in Palo Alto, Calif. Ramos was held overnight at Stanford University Medical Center and was released late yesterday. Ramos was to return the U.S. team's training base in Mission Viejo, Calif.
NEWS
September 17, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC Daedalus
Five hundred years ago, in the winter of 1502, Leonardo da Vinci and Niccolo Machiavelli were in the employ of the powerful prince Cesare Borgia. There is no historical evidence that the great artist who painted the Mona Lisa and the brilliant political theorist who wrote The Prince ever met, but the fact that they might have was enough for David Davalos. He put them - along with Borgia and his famous poisoning sister Lucrezia - together in a play, Daedalus: A Fantasia of Leonardo da Vinci, which premieres tonight at the Arden Theatre Company.
LIVING
April 4, 1999 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leonardo da Vinci was the very essence of the Renaissance man - painter, inventor, engineer, musician. He may have been the greatest genius of all time, whose example we can all emulate in an effort to tap our own little bit of genius. And now, to help us do the tapping, Michael J. Gelb has written How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci: Seven Steps to Genius Every Day (Delacorte Press, $24.95). The seven da Vincian principles, as abstracted from the master's teachings - and listed in Italian - by Gelb are: Curiosita, an insatiably curious approach to life; Dimostrazione, a commitment to testing knowledge through experience; Sensazione, the continual refinement of the senses, especially sight, as the means to clarify experience; Sfumato, a willingness to embrace ambiguity, paradox and uncertainty; Arte/Scienze, the development of the balance between science and art, logic and imagination ("whole-brain thinking")
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonardo Hidalgo's art career spanned several countries and dozens of years, but it was a dance school that brought him to Philadelphia. Mr. Hidalgo, who was born in the Philippines, was already a well-established artist and professor there when his only daughter won a scholarship to Philadelphia's Rock School of Pennsylvania Ballet in 1992. Mr. Hidalgo moved the family to Philadelphia - where he kept painting - and ended up staying for the rest of his life. He died at home Wednesday, Jan. 16, at 78 after suffering a heart attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2013 | Reviewed by Michael D. Schaffer
Leonardo and the Last Supper By Ross King Walker. 322 pp. $28   Leonardo da Vinci was a genius of delay, a master of the unfinished. Brilliant ideas swirled around him like snowflakes in a flurry and melted almost as quickly. Frustrated patrons tried in vain to get him to complete commissions, but the perfectionist wouldn't be hurried. Unfinished work seemed to be a Leonardo specialty, and as the last decade of the 15th century dawned, he had frustratingly little to show for the prodigious talent he had displayed in his youth.
NEWS
November 10, 2012
Leonardo Favio, a film director, actor, and singer who was one of Argentina's most enduring cultural figures, died Monday in Buenos Aires after a series of illnesses, the Associated Press reported. Mr. Favio began acting in movies in the 1950s under the direction of the noted Argentine filmmaker Leopoldo Torre Nilsson, and he soon became a star. After he appeared in Nilsson's 1958 release The Kidnapper, he became popularly known as "the Argentine James Dean. " Over the next decade, Mr. Favio continued to appear on screen and also began directing films of his own. In 1965, he directed his first feature-length movie, the semiautobiographical, black-and-white Chronicle of a Lonely Child.
NEWS
February 12, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Leonardo DiCaprio likes his coffee smooth - a light roast, nectar-like, no bitterness. Just ask Todd Carmichael and Jean-Philippe Iberti, who spent more than a year perfecting a blend to suit the palate of the Hollywood star. The founding partners of La Colombe, the Philadelphia-based roastery with cafés here and in New York and Chicago, paid repeated visits to DiCaprio's West Hollywood abode to brew him single-batch roasts and to test blends, working to come up with a new La Colombe label that would bear DiCaprio's signature.
NEWS
February 6, 2011 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The intricate designs on faded paper are the work of history's most celebrated Renaissance man, depicting flying machines, mechanical animals, artillery, and an odd musical instrument you'd never see in the Kimmel Center. Leonardo da Vinci did not actually build most of these marvels. Yet, five centuries later, a team of Italian scholars has managed to do so, taking the wooden creations to the Franklin Institute for an exhibit that opened Saturday. The Inquirer put Leonardo's work to the test, arranging for a sneak preview of the exhibit, "Leonardo da Vinci's Workshop," by two people well-qualified to evaluate it. Both are engineers at Drexel University and classically trained musicians.
NEWS
April 15, 2005 | By Michael J. Gelb
Michael J. Gelb is author of How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci: Seven Steps to Genius Every Day and Da Vinci Decoded: Discovering the Spiritual Secrets of Leonardo's Seven Principles. About 500 years before you opened this newspaper, Leonardo da Vinci put the finishing touches on the Mona Lisa. It is not just this one work of art that is the benchmark of Leonardo's genius, for over the centuries he has enchanted not only artists, but also scientists, designers, engineers, inventors and anyone who seeks to know the secrets of creativity.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2004 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
As Leonardo DiCaprio flamboyantly plays him in Martin Scorsese's The Aviator, Howard Hughes was a man known for fast planes, faster women, and sudden mood drops. A highflier often accompanied by his babe du jour (among them Katharine Hepburn and Ava Gardner), Hughes was a mythic figure, an American Icarus scorched by the sun. He walked away unhurt from plane crashes but had less luck coming back from crack-ups of the psychological kind. Scorsese's terrifically entertaining film paints Hughes as a shining figure who retreats into shadow.
NEWS
January 29, 2004 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A man who raped an 11-year-old girl just eight months after he was paroled for a prior attack was sentenced yesterday to 14 to 29 years in prison. Stephen Leonardo, 41, pleaded guilty in October to raping the girl on May 12. He attacked her as she walked through Harrowgate Park at 1800 E. Tioga St. Leonardo, whose last address was in the 600 block of East Luzerne Street in North Philadelphia, had served eight years in Graterford Prison for a Delaware County rape. Yesterday, he agreed to be designated a sexually violent predator, meaning that after he has served his prison sentence, the state will notify his neighbors and local school and day-care officials of his new residence.
NEWS
September 17, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC Daedalus
Five hundred years ago, in the winter of 1502, Leonardo da Vinci and Niccolo Machiavelli were in the employ of the powerful prince Cesare Borgia. There is no historical evidence that the great artist who painted the Mona Lisa and the brilliant political theorist who wrote The Prince ever met, but the fact that they might have was enough for David Davalos. He put them - along with Borgia and his famous poisoning sister Lucrezia - together in a play, Daedalus: A Fantasia of Leonardo da Vinci, which premieres tonight at the Arden Theatre Company.
NEWS
November 21, 2001
It's a bridge too far, sure enough, but its reach is for ageless imagination and the willingness to take risks. What a fine walk near Oslo, Norway, it must be across the newly opened bridge based on the 16th-century design by Leonardo da Vinci. In 1502, Sultan Bajazet II commissioned the Renaissance man to design a structure to cross the Golden Horn, an inlet at the mouth of the Bosporus River in what is modern-day Turkey. Leonardo being Leonardo, he envisioned a stone bridge based on ridiculously innovative uses of art and physics.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|