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Leonidas Kavakos

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2007 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
If violinist Leonidas Kavakos and pianist P?ter Nagy didn't quite reach a plateau of revelation Thursday night in Beethoven's Violin Sonata No. 10 in G major, they made up for it in a million ways great and small elsewhere during their Perelman Theater program. Kavakos is a spectacular artist. His name is familiar here for playing the concertos of Berg, Beethoven and the rare Schumann. But recitals are tough - longer and more stylistically varied than concerto work, and microscopic in the attention they beam on a personality.
NEWS
November 22, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Among the things I've discovered at the orchestra over the years is that a good way to engage your seat mate is to say that the next piece is about a man punished by strapping him naked to the back of a horse and sending him through the countryside. Fortunately, on Thursday night, this was actually the case. It might be surprising, but Franz Liszt's Mazeppa , inspired by the Victor Hugo poem, ends happily, which the Philadelphia Orchestra did, too, performing the tone poem for the first time since 1983.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1999 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Authors know it can take pages and pages of sentences before they discover the story they are writing. Musicians, too, can be well into a performance before they find their interpretative voice. Leonidas Kavakos' offering of the Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto in D major brought this to mind on Thursday night. Stock-still and solemn as a ghost, the violinist stood in front of the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts. He was so still only his bow arm appeared to move.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Leonidas Kavakos is a marvel of exactitude. There's a Leonardo da Vinci-like quality to his playing, as if you could plot mathematically how every micro move accounts for his elegance and efficiency. In this extraordinary violinist, artist and master technician coexist in polished communion. If a listener Tuesday night had to strain a bit to hear that which is human, it was understandable. In his Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital at the Kimmel Center of four Beethoven sonatas, Kavakos was sometimes a cool customer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Artistry as extreme as Leonidas Kavakos' can be exhausting. Admirably, the Greek violinist has risen to the top of his profession in tandem with artistic evolution that few artists experience over a lifetime, much less a dozen years. In 2000, he was including light Fritz Kreisler pieces in the thick of his programs. At his Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital at the Kimmel Center on Monday, his program stretched over 21/2 hours with brooding performances of ruminative works by Prokofiev and Lera Auerbach that left you wondering if late Shostakovich could brighten things up a bit. Even having heard Kavakos on a near daily basis during the Philadelphia Orchestra's 2009 tour, I had trouble recognizing what I heard and saw Monday.
NEWS
September 28, 2000 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA, Wolfgang Sawallisch, conducting; Leonidas Kavakos, violinist. 8 p.m. Thursday and Tuesday, 2 p.m. Friday at Academy of Music. Tickets: $18-60. Info: 215-893-1999. Those who were fortunate enough to hear Greek-born violinist Leonidas Kavakos play the Tchaikovsky Concerto with brilliance at the Mann two seasons ago have eagerly anticipated his Academy debut. He'll be playing another repertory standard, the beloved Mendelssohn Violin Concerto, with Maestro Sawallisch also leading Schubert's Third Symphony and Mozart's deeply moving Symphony No. 40. "For me, the Mendelssohn is romantic Mozart," explained Kavakos, "music so flawlessly right that I can imagine he just took a pen and wrote it right down just like Mozart.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2002 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Normally at this time of year, the Philadelphia Orchestra has long cleared out of Center City, having ended its regular season in early May and already spent three weeks breezing through concert halls in Buenos Aires, Tokyo or Ames. But scheduling issues, including a late opening of the Kimmel Center, kept the orchestra at home this spring, extending its downtown season well into this month. Orchestra leaders also bet that demand to hear the new concert hall would be sufficient to add a three-concert coda, which came in the form of the "Absolutely Mozart" festival that opened Thursday night.
NEWS
November 20, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Philadelphia's Unintentional Bartok Festival - an accidental convergence of significant Bartok performances over the last week - had a gratifying climax on Thursday by the Philadelphia Orchestra: Guest conductor Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos programmed the popular Concerto for Orchestra only days after Midori made the Violin Sonata No. 1 more lucid than I could ever have hoped, and the Juilliard Quartet brought decades of authority to the ...
LIVING
September 28, 2000 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Nearly everywhere violinist Leonidas Kavakos goes these days, he faces microphones and cameras. Not famous enough to worry about image control, but intriguing enough to evoke curiosity in a world hungry for new talent, Kavakos had a battery of TV cameras from a Long Island station soaking up every note of his New York recital on Saturday. And in locales as far apart as Saarbrucken, Germany, and this week's Philadelphia Orchestra appearances, he'll be taped for radio. And as if he weren't unavoidable enough, compact discs ranging from lightweight Fritz Kreisler to Paul Hindemith's cerebral Violin Concerto are about to hit the stores.
NEWS
February 10, 2009 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
If ever the Philadelphia Orchestra had the impetus to transcend its own excellence, it's the current tour of the Canary Islands and Europe. But if ever circumstances worked against that. . . . Even in the acoustically superb Auditorio Nacional de Musica in Madrid last week, the orchestra had experienced so many successive days of traveling and playing - sometimes in halls with a built-in defeat factor - that lost ground wasn't made up immediately. Would audiences for these last Iberian dates of the tour know the difference?
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NEWS
November 22, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Among the things I've discovered at the orchestra over the years is that a good way to engage your seat mate is to say that the next piece is about a man punished by strapping him naked to the back of a horse and sending him through the countryside. Fortunately, on Thursday night, this was actually the case. It might be surprising, but Franz Liszt's Mazeppa , inspired by the Victor Hugo poem, ends happily, which the Philadelphia Orchestra did, too, performing the tone poem for the first time since 1983.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Leonidas Kavakos is a marvel of exactitude. There's a Leonardo da Vinci-like quality to his playing, as if you could plot mathematically how every micro move accounts for his elegance and efficiency. In this extraordinary violinist, artist and master technician coexist in polished communion. If a listener Tuesday night had to strain a bit to hear that which is human, it was understandable. In his Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital at the Kimmel Center of four Beethoven sonatas, Kavakos was sometimes a cool customer.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
ON STAGES Child's play Jennifer Childs' brilliant one-woman show, "Why I'm Scared of Dance," is funny and touching, without being sentimental. She originally performed it at 1812 Productions, the all-comedy theater company that she helped found. Act II Playhouse, 56 E. Butler Ave., Ambler, through Jan. 27, $22-33, 215-654-0200, act2.org. Wyatt's earth "The Daily Show" lost a heavy-hitter when Wyatt Cenac left last year. Check out his stand-up. Trocadero, 1003 Arch St., 8 p.m. Friday, $20, 215-922-6888, thetroc.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Artistry as extreme as Leonidas Kavakos' can be exhausting. Admirably, the Greek violinist has risen to the top of his profession in tandem with artistic evolution that few artists experience over a lifetime, much less a dozen years. In 2000, he was including light Fritz Kreisler pieces in the thick of his programs. At his Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital at the Kimmel Center on Monday, his program stretched over 21/2 hours with brooding performances of ruminative works by Prokofiev and Lera Auerbach that left you wondering if late Shostakovich could brighten things up a bit. Even having heard Kavakos on a near daily basis during the Philadelphia Orchestra's 2009 tour, I had trouble recognizing what I heard and saw Monday.
NEWS
November 20, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Philadelphia's Unintentional Bartok Festival - an accidental convergence of significant Bartok performances over the last week - had a gratifying climax on Thursday by the Philadelphia Orchestra: Guest conductor Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos programmed the popular Concerto for Orchestra only days after Midori made the Violin Sonata No. 1 more lucid than I could ever have hoped, and the Juilliard Quartet brought decades of authority to the ...
NEWS
February 10, 2009 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
If ever the Philadelphia Orchestra had the impetus to transcend its own excellence, it's the current tour of the Canary Islands and Europe. But if ever circumstances worked against that. . . . Even in the acoustically superb Auditorio Nacional de Musica in Madrid last week, the orchestra had experienced so many successive days of traveling and playing - sometimes in halls with a built-in defeat factor - that lost ground wasn't made up immediately. Would audiences for these last Iberian dates of the tour know the difference?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2007 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
If violinist Leonidas Kavakos and pianist P?ter Nagy didn't quite reach a plateau of revelation Thursday night in Beethoven's Violin Sonata No. 10 in G major, they made up for it in a million ways great and small elsewhere during their Perelman Theater program. Kavakos is a spectacular artist. His name is familiar here for playing the concertos of Berg, Beethoven and the rare Schumann. But recitals are tough - longer and more stylistically varied than concerto work, and microscopic in the attention they beam on a personality.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2003 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
German composer Robert Schumann bridged the classical and romantic periods, and Wolfgang Sawallisch celebrates that urgent friction in this second of five Philadelphia Orchestra season programs of Schumann's music. He's selected the Third Symphony, depicting Schumann's beloved Rhine River, and the very rarely heard Violin Concerto (featuring soloist Leonidas Kavakos), with Weber's bubbly "Die Freischutz" Overture as a curtain-raiser. The Greek-born Kavakos dazzled in his first outing, and it's a delight to see this young master as a regular guest.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2002 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Normally at this time of year, the Philadelphia Orchestra has long cleared out of Center City, having ended its regular season in early May and already spent three weeks breezing through concert halls in Buenos Aires, Tokyo or Ames. But scheduling issues, including a late opening of the Kimmel Center, kept the orchestra at home this spring, extending its downtown season well into this month. Orchestra leaders also bet that demand to hear the new concert hall would be sufficient to add a three-concert coda, which came in the form of the "Absolutely Mozart" festival that opened Thursday night.
NEWS
September 28, 2000 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA, Wolfgang Sawallisch, conducting; Leonidas Kavakos, violinist. 8 p.m. Thursday and Tuesday, 2 p.m. Friday at Academy of Music. Tickets: $18-60. Info: 215-893-1999. Those who were fortunate enough to hear Greek-born violinist Leonidas Kavakos play the Tchaikovsky Concerto with brilliance at the Mann two seasons ago have eagerly anticipated his Academy debut. He'll be playing another repertory standard, the beloved Mendelssohn Violin Concerto, with Maestro Sawallisch also leading Schubert's Third Symphony and Mozart's deeply moving Symphony No. 40. "For me, the Mendelssohn is romantic Mozart," explained Kavakos, "music so flawlessly right that I can imagine he just took a pen and wrote it right down just like Mozart.
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