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Lesion

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SPORTS
July 12, 2012 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A review of an ultrasound on Belmont Stakes winner Union Rags determined that the horse did not have a tendon injury, as his connections originally believed Tuesday, but "a small lesion of his high suspensory [ligament] that appeared to be brand new," veterinarian Kathy Anderson said. She believed it had "likely occurred" during his last workout, on Friday. Union Rags' chances of a full return to racing are excellent, Anderson said. "He is scheduled to undergo treatment and therapy immediately, with the goal of keeping his options open for 2013.
SPORTS
March 18, 1998 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Curt Schilling, who for the last few years has been trying to quit chewing tobacco, has a white lesion in his mouth and will visit a Clearwater doctor this morning for further examination, the Phillies said yesterday. Jeff Cooper, the team's trainer, would not reveal results of a biopsy done last week, saying it was "the patient's privileged information. " "He doesn't have cancer now, but it's a very good warning for him to stop" chewing tobacco, Cooper said of the righthander after the Phillies' 8-3 exhibition victory over Atlanta yesterday.
SPORTS
May 8, 2001 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Larry Bowa had disturbing news for his players yesterday afternoon. He cleared the visiting clubhouse at Enron Field for a team meeting. It wasn't about the Phillies' hitting or pitching or fielding. It was news about his longtime friend John Vukovich, the team's third-base coach. Vukovich, who had been suffering from headaches since spring training, is scheduled for brain surgery at 8 a.m. today at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia. He underwent a magnetic resonance imaging test Sunday morning at Jefferson, which uncovered a lesion on his brain.
NEWS
October 17, 1987 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Nancy Reagan will undergo a biopsy this morning for suspected breast cancer, and her left breast will be removed if the results show a malignancy, the White House announced yesterday. The procedure was scheduled after a mammogram taken during a routine annual checkup on Oct. 5 detected a "suspicious lesion that might represent an early stage of malignancy" in the left breast, according to a White House statement. The lesion, which could not be detected by touch, may prove to be benign, making removal of the breast unnecessary, White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said.
NEWS
October 12, 1996 | By Jeff Gammage, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Steve Goldstein of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
Sen. Arlen Specter looked tired and a little pale, but his voice and handshake were firm. He said he felt good yesterday after undergoing treatment for a benign brain tumor for the second time in three years. "I feel fine," the state's senior senator said during a news conference at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "They served me a big piece of cake, and that's what this day has been, a piece of cake. " Specter came to Presbyterian University Hospital yesterday morning for outpatient radiation treatment, directed at a tumor on the surface of the left frontal area of his brain.
NEWS
March 30, 1991 | The Associated Press, Reuters, the Los Angeles Daily News and Knight-Ridder contributed to this report
WASHINGTON AIR FORCE: AGENT ORANGE LINK FOUND TO DIABETES A study of airmen exposed to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War revealed links between the herbicide and some ailments such as diabetes, but no relationship with cancer, the Air Force said yesterday. The Air Force said its report, the fourth on Agent Orange and its dioxin contaminant, was the first large-scale scientific study to accurately measure the effects of the defoliant on health. It comes two months after Congress voted unanimously to award permanent disability benefits to Vietnam War veterans suffering from two types of cancer they claim resulted from Agent Orange exposure - non-Hodgkins' lymphoma and soft-tissue sarcoma.
SPORTS
May 6, 1995 | by Les Bowen, Daily News Sports Writer
No, Flyers team physician Jeff Hartzell said yesterday, Eric Lindros probably will not go blind if he plays hockey and reinjures his traumatized left eye. But if the clot formed on the lesion on a tiny blood vessel in Lindros's eye - quite possibly the "Lesion of Doom" for the Flyers - should be jarred loose, Hartzell said, blood would pool in the eye, and Lindros might require surgery that would keep him out "until sometime in 1995-96. " That was the scenario this week as daily exams tracked the progress of Lindros's healing from Sunday's injury, a microhyphema, sustained when Lindros was struck just below the eye with a puck after his shot deflected off New York Ranger Jeff Beukeboom.
SPORTS
March 23, 1996 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ignore all the acronyms, euphemisms, confusing terminology and seeming contradictions and the bottom line is this: Phillies pitcher Tyler Green is expected to be lost for the season. A magnetic-resonance-imaging exam, the second of Green's sore right shoulder in less than three weeks, revealed a tear of the labrum, club physician Phillip Marone said yesterday. The so-called SLAP (superior labral anterior and posterior) lesion is the same kind of injury that ended Curt Schilling's 1995 season.
NEWS
February 22, 2012
Fatal fire possibly set by accident TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras - The Honduran government said Tuesday that a dropped cigarette may have set off the worst prison fire in a century as it announced that another death from the Feb. 14 blaze had brought the toll to 360. Chief prosecutor Luis Alberto Rubi told Channel 5 television that results of the initial investigation show the fire was accidental, despite earlier reports that a mattress was set ablaze...
SPORTS
January 18, 2011 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
Turkish prisons aren't what they used to be. In Midnight Express, it took Billy Hayes - the protagonist sentenced to three decades of hard time for drug smuggling - five long years to find an opening and eventually break out of jail. Even then, in the movie version, his freedom came at the expense of his sanity and a guard's life. Allen Iverson managed to escape from Turkey in just a few months - and he didn't even have Randy Quaid to help him. Impressive. Last week, Iverson decided to return to the United States to have surgery to remove a lesion from his right leg. When the news was announced, there was speculation in Turkey that Iverson might retire.
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SPORTS
July 12, 2012 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A review of an ultrasound on Belmont Stakes winner Union Rags determined that the horse did not have a tendon injury, as his connections originally believed Tuesday, but "a small lesion of his high suspensory [ligament] that appeared to be brand new," veterinarian Kathy Anderson said. She believed it had "likely occurred" during his last workout, on Friday. Union Rags' chances of a full return to racing are excellent, Anderson said. "He is scheduled to undergo treatment and therapy immediately, with the goal of keeping his options open for 2013.
NEWS
February 22, 2012
Fatal fire possibly set by accident TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras - The Honduran government said Tuesday that a dropped cigarette may have set off the worst prison fire in a century as it announced that another death from the Feb. 14 blaze had brought the toll to 360. Chief prosecutor Luis Alberto Rubi told Channel 5 television that results of the initial investigation show the fire was accidental, despite earlier reports that a mattress was set ablaze...
SPORTS
January 18, 2011 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
Turkish prisons aren't what they used to be. In Midnight Express, it took Billy Hayes - the protagonist sentenced to three decades of hard time for drug smuggling - five long years to find an opening and eventually break out of jail. Even then, in the movie version, his freedom came at the expense of his sanity and a guard's life. Allen Iverson managed to escape from Turkey in just a few months - and he didn't even have Randy Quaid to help him. Impressive. Last week, Iverson decided to return to the United States to have surgery to remove a lesion from his right leg. When the news was announced, there was speculation in Turkey that Iverson might retire.
NEWS
August 3, 2005 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Up and down the sprawling Susquehanna River, a destination for anglers nationwide, the spring hatch of the most popular game fish is turning up with large skin lesions whose cause is a mystery. And fishermen in some areas of the river report that adult smallmouth bass have virtually disappeared. Scientists say that the two developments are unrelated, and some decline in legal-size fish had been expected because of below-average reproduction the last several years. But the skin lesions, caused by a bacterial infection that strikes fish with weakened immune systems, are a puzzle.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2004 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scientists said yesterday that an experimental vaccine that may be the first to fight a virus linked to cervical cancer was highly effective in reducing the risk of infections and precancerous lesions in women studied over four years. The vaccine, developed by Merck & Co. Inc. at its West Point research center outside Philadelphia, was 94 percent effective in protecting women from infection against one human papilloma virus - HPV type 16 - believed responsible for half of all cervical cancers, according to a study presented yesterday at a medical conference in Washington.
SPORTS
May 8, 2001 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Larry Bowa had disturbing news for his players yesterday afternoon. He cleared the visiting clubhouse at Enron Field for a team meeting. It wasn't about the Phillies' hitting or pitching or fielding. It was news about his longtime friend John Vukovich, the team's third-base coach. Vukovich, who had been suffering from headaches since spring training, is scheduled for brain surgery at 8 a.m. today at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia. He underwent a magnetic resonance imaging test Sunday morning at Jefferson, which uncovered a lesion on his brain.
SPORTS
March 18, 1998 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Curt Schilling sat through the Phillies' annual lecture on the dangers of smokeless tobacco. Later, he talked passionately about how he would now kick the habit. That was last year. He couldn't do it. So yesterday the Phillies had to make a scary announcement. A leukoplakia, also known as a white lesion, was discovered in Schilling's mouth during a routine oral examination on March 8. A biopsy was performed last week, and he will visit Dr. Daniel Melker this morning for a further examination.
SPORTS
March 18, 1998 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Curt Schilling, who for the last few years has been trying to quit chewing tobacco, has a white lesion in his mouth and will visit a Clearwater doctor this morning for further examination, the Phillies said yesterday. Jeff Cooper, the team's trainer, would not reveal results of a biopsy done last week, saying it was "the patient's privileged information. " "He doesn't have cancer now, but it's a very good warning for him to stop" chewing tobacco, Cooper said of the righthander after the Phillies' 8-3 exhibition victory over Atlanta yesterday.
NEWS
October 12, 1996 | By Jeff Gammage, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Steve Goldstein of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
Sen. Arlen Specter looked tired and a little pale, but his voice and handshake were firm. He said he felt good yesterday after undergoing treatment for a benign brain tumor for the second time in three years. "I feel fine," the state's senior senator said during a news conference at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "They served me a big piece of cake, and that's what this day has been, a piece of cake. " Specter came to Presbyterian University Hospital yesterday morning for outpatient radiation treatment, directed at a tumor on the surface of the left frontal area of his brain.
SPORTS
March 23, 1996 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ignore all the acronyms, euphemisms, confusing terminology and seeming contradictions and the bottom line is this: Phillies pitcher Tyler Green is expected to be lost for the season. A magnetic-resonance-imaging exam, the second of Green's sore right shoulder in less than three weeks, revealed a tear of the labrum, club physician Phillip Marone said yesterday. The so-called SLAP (superior labral anterior and posterior) lesion is the same kind of injury that ended Curt Schilling's 1995 season.
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