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Lethal Weapon

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SPORTS
June 28, 1990 | By Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
In his mock drafts, in his most private of thoughts, in his scribblings on napkins, Bob Weinhauer told himself there was no way. The kid was too good, too versatile, too appealing to the talent-hungry NBA teams holding the 31 picks ahead of the 76ers in last night's NBA draft. Brian Oliver, the third partner in "Lethal Weapon 3" from Georgia Tech? There was no way. Yes, there was. The sweet, 6-4 guard whom Weinhauer described as "the closest thing to a young Joe Dumars" in the talent pool became the Sixers' draft gemstone.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1989 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Essentially a Three Stooges comedy with blood, Lethal Weapon 2 is, like its first installment, a furiously fast and funny mismatched-cop caper that produces more laughs and adrenalin than is probably good for you. Like a lot of things that aren't good for you, it's awfully enjoyable. When the projector broke during the screening - right after the ripsnorting chase sequence that opens the film - the audience heaved a collective sigh, glad to catch its breath. It would be the last gasp of oxygen for nearly two hours of warp-speed pursuit and pistol-whipping showdowns during which L.A. officers Murtaugh (Danny Glover)
SPORTS
December 13, 2011
I'd like to nominate an unconventional candidate for 2011 Fantasy MVP. No, it's not Aaron Rodgers, who has been consistently outstanding all season. It's not LeSean McCoy, who tops the running back rankings with 1,482 total yards and 17 touchdowns - five more than his nearest competitor. Nor is it Wes Welker, who leads all receivers with 100 receptions and 1,339 yards, plus nine TDs. Rather, my choice is Welker's teammate, Rob Gronkowski - the most lethal tight end in the business.
NEWS
May 15, 1992 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The summer movie season gets a suitable kickoff with "Lethal Weapon 3," an action movie perennial that features lots of violence, a few laughs and a crowd-pleasing cameo from Mel Gibson's bottom. The makers of "Lethal Weapon" have smartly built on the central relationship between detectives Riggs and Murtaugh (Gibson and Danny Glover, respectively), adding new characters to keep the movies fresh, to a degree. The first sequel featured a comic supporting role for Joe Pesci, playing a pesky civilian sidekick.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1993 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It's official. The ledgers have been ledged, the computers have computed and 1992's Top 10 box office hits have been declared. They are, in descending order: Batman Returns ($163 million); Home Alone 2: Lost in New York ($145.8 million - and now busy racking up '93 dollars); Lethal Weapon 3 ($144.7 million); Sister Act ($139.6 million); Wayne's World ($121.6 million); Basic Instinct ($117.2 million); Aladdin ($114.8 million and still counting), A League of Their Own ($107.4 million)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1998 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Seeking to rekindle a spark in its franchise burned-out cop Martin Riggs, Lethal Weapon 4 opens with a guy in a bulletproof suit brandishing a flamethrower on a Los Angeles street. He fails to torch Mel Gibson, but does ignite a loaded fuel tanker, a gas station, and most of a city block. Why is he doing this? Is he a berserk pyromaniac or simply a man having trouble getting his cigarette going on a windy night? Because this is a Lethal Weapon movie, you can go figure. Writer Channing Gibson and director Richard Donner have already moved Riggs (Gibson)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1990 | By Jeff Seiken, Special to The Inquirer
Among the slew of 1989 movies that carried numbers as part of their names, Lethal Weapon 2 was notable on two counts: It earned more money than its predecessor and it received generally favorable reviews. That may seem modest as achievements go, yet most sequels fail on both counts. Still, it's easy to see why Hollywood is so enamored of them: A sequel is a form of pre-packaged entertainment built around a premise already familiar to moviegoers. It feeds off its predecessor's popularity, even when the name - The Sting II is a prime example - is the only thing the sequel has in common with the original.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In the five years that separate Lethal Weapon from Lethal Weapon 3, there have been enough burned-out cops in movies to constitute a fire hazard. Mel Gibson is now reduced to trying to light up his third noisy outing as Marty Riggs by giving up smoking. But the spark of ignition is missing from Lethal Weapon 3 - an outing that follows the formula of its hugely successful predecessors without matching their caliber. The decline and the mail-it-in feel of the performances and script were perhaps to be expected.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1989 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Using the standards set by the original, "Lethal Weapon 2" is a better movie - better because it is noisier, bloodier and more preposterous. The sequel is more streamlined. It is not weighed down by a plot or by extraneous characters (people without guns). And "2" offers more of the stuff that made "Lethal Weapon" a huge hit - violence. The people who made Part 2 say they've cut down on the violence. That is a big fib. In this action-drenched sequel, we see people killed by exploding home entertainment units, exploding swimming-pool accessories and a carpenter's nail gun. There's one chain strangulation, one drowning, one smash-the-head- repeatedly-with-the-car-door killing and one attempted murder via an exploding toilet.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"Lethal Weapon," an action drama starring Mel Gibson, Danny Glover and Gary Busey. Directed by Richard Donner. Screenplay by Shane Black. Running time: 105 minutes. A Warner Brothers release. At area theaters. Last week's movie about a mad-dog white cop and his steady black partner was "Number One with a Bullet. " This week's is "Lethal Weapon. " It's an improvement, but not big enough to make you want the trend to continue. Actually, "Lethal Weapon" proceeds from an intriguing premise: a cop who's literally fearless not because he is courageous but because he is suicidal.
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NEWS
January 17, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE cop/buddy/action movie essentially funded the movie industry in Reagan/Clinton-era America, before the genre toe-tagged around the time of "Lethal Weapon 4. " The tag read "do not resuscitate," but attempts continue. In "Ride Along," director Tim Story puts the corpse on the table and shocks it with a couple of paddles named Ice Cube and Kevin Hart. It's Hart who provides the amps, pouring energy and ideas into an obviously hyper-improvised role as Ben, a timid security guard who spends a day with a hardboiled Atlanta detective (Cube)
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | BY JAD SLEIMAN, Daily News Staff Writer sleimaj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
A POTTSTOWN high-school student allegedly had smoked pot and was texting when he veered across two lanes and fatally struck a jogger earlier this month, police say, and prosecutors hope to use his high to get a lengthier sentence. The Montgomery County District Attorney's Office on Thursday announced charges of DUI and vehicular homicide against Justin Jackson, 18. A news release notes that investigators found traces of marijuana in the Pottstown teen's blood shortly after the crash.
NEWS
March 9, 2012
ONE of the lunkheads who has organized an armed sit-in of a Delco Applebee's says that if we are afraid of guns, it just means we need more education about them. Dozens of people licensed to openly carry their guns are planning to show up at the restaurant tomorrow to make people more aware of the law that allows them to advertise the fact they're carrying. So if you're intimidated by a restaurant filled with armed people who insist on showing you they're armed, it means that you're just dumb?
SPORTS
December 13, 2011
I'd like to nominate an unconventional candidate for 2011 Fantasy MVP. No, it's not Aaron Rodgers, who has been consistently outstanding all season. It's not LeSean McCoy, who tops the running back rankings with 1,482 total yards and 17 touchdowns - five more than his nearest competitor. Nor is it Wes Welker, who leads all receivers with 100 receptions and 1,339 yards, plus nine TDs. Rather, my choice is Welker's teammate, Rob Gronkowski - the most lethal tight end in the business.
SPORTS
December 2, 2011
SEATTLE - This isn't Pop Warner. This isn't JV football, or high school or even college. This is business. DeSean Jackson is an asset. He is an underperforming asset, and, at $600,000, embarrassingly underpaid. He also is selfish and churlish. Isolationist. Cowardly. So what? Pay him. This is the NFL. There is no lesson to be taught by staring down an immature nonprofessional. He is too valuable. He is irreplaceable. Jackson wants a long-term, big-money contract extension.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2011 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
A Mel Gibson movie opening on Friday the 13th - if you're into omens (where are we on the Mayan calendar?), this can't be good. Certainly "The Beaver" is grappling with a box-office curse - the taint of rant-prone Mel, making his first movie appearance since pleading no contest to charges that he abused his girlfriend. There was never much hope that "The Beaver" was going to make "Lethal Weapon" dollars. The script sat unproduced in Hollywood for years, reputed to be well-written but too weird for general audiences.
SPORTS
December 8, 2010 | By FRANK SERAVALLI, seravaf@phillynews.com
DANNY BRIERE did not hesitate. He cannot remember the last time life was this good. Even though he has missed three games due to suspension, Briere leads the Flyers with 14 goals, he is completely healthy, and - for the first time in a long time - everything is falling into place off the ice. For the last 2 years, Briere struggled with a divorce that he admits sometimes affected his play. But the Flyers' highest-paid player - and at times, most lethal weapon - says that's behind him. "There were a lot of things going on that probably didn't go the way I wanted to," Briere said in a candid November interview.
NEWS
January 1, 2009 | By Mario F. Cattabiani INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Christopher B. Craig, one of former State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo's most loyal aides and widely considered among the best legal minds in the Capitol, has resigned from the Senate staff after 16 years. Craig, who is credited with writing the landmark 2004 law that legalized slot machines in Pennsylvania, said yesterday that he resigned from his $158,300-a-year post as a top lawyer for Senate Democrats to explore other job opportunities. But several sources familiar with the matter said Craig resigned after learning that he would not continue as chief counsel to Democrats on the Senate Appropriations Committee and would be reassigned to a lower legal post.
NEWS
November 21, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Secrets run in the Whitfield family. They also walk, pratfall and crash into the L.A. River. This Christmas, Ma'Dere (Loretta Devine), matriarch of the clan, looks forward to seeing all six of her broods together for the first time in years. Before they arrive, though, she asks Joe (Delroy Lindo), her live-in love, to move his clothes into the garage so she can maintain the fiction that he is just a friend. A holiday evergreen set in the Los Angeles neighborhood of West Adams, This Christmas is a family reunion comedy with appealing, if familiar, characters and a soundtrack upbeat as its story.
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