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NEWS
September 27, 2014
ISSUE | NICKNAMES Consider the source While a recent letter writer wrote that the R-word "has no place in the vocabulary of a people whose founding document proclaims that all men are created equal," that same document refers to Native Americans as "merciless Indian Savages," hardly a better moniker ("Far better monikers than a racial slur," Sept. 23). Indeed, the Declaration of Independence is an incredibly inspiring proclamation, but it does have its warts. |Randy Sommovilla, Philadelphia No one's whooping Not only do I not care about your rant against the Redskins' team nickname, but I'm sick of efforts to force politically correct opinions ("Visiting team needs new name," Sept.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | BY JAMES BUEHLER, M.D. AND DONALD F. SCHWARZ, M.D., MPH
  MORE THAN 500,000 Philadelphians have been regular smokers at some point in their lives. Approximately half have quit smoking. The other half continue to smoke. "I started smoking when I was twelve," said Susan McTamney, a former City of Philadelphia employee. "I stole my first cigarette off my sister. I smoked for 36 years . . . 4 packs per day for the last 15 years of my smoking habit. " Yet most smokers don't want to be smokers. In fact, nine out of ten regret having ever started smoking, and the majority have tried to quit in the past year.
NEWS
September 25, 2014
COUNCILMAN Kenney wants those charged in the Center City beating charged federally with a hate crime. While I believe they should be, if in fact that's why they beat those guys. You have to follow the laws on the books. But if he in fact wants to charge someone with a hate crime, how about all those black thugs who assault old white people playing the knockout game? You don't have the guts, Mr. Kenney, because it's not politically correct. Steven J. Donegan Essington, Pa. The recent attack on the gay couple in Center City shows how the police allow one group of white perpetrators to turn themselves in, but if the accused were black the police would be picking up van loads of black youth in Center City.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2014 | By Jan L. Apple, For The Inquirer
The sepia-toned transparency of Paulette Jellinek's late parents hangs inside a window, a constant reminder of her family's tragic and triumphant past. It is this story that Jellinek, a Haverford artist who has taught here and in Israel, seeks to share with the world through www.shoahletters.org . As the name implies, her nearly year-old website archives letters written primarily from 1938 to 1941 by family members, many of whom perished in the Holocaust; but also photographs, documents such as Nazi-acquired asset inventories, family biographies, and historic maps.
NEWS
September 24, 2014 | BY RUE LANDAU
  LEAVES changing colors. School bells ringing. Footballs spiraling. Clearly, it's fall, a season filled with ribbons and walks to bring greater focus on health issues such as diabetes, HIV and breast cancer. Domestic-violence prevention is another cause that gets an autumn spotlight. This year it's burning brighter. Recent headlines from the NFL certainly have helped thrust the matter even further into our consciousness. With high-profile cases involving players such as former Baltimore Raven Ray Rice and San Francisco 49er Ray McDonald, intimate-partner violence again has become public fodder, for men and women, boys and girls.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Times are tough, right? That's one of the few reasons I can imagine for the spreading revival of A.R. Gurney's Love Letters , which opened this week both at Delaware Theatre Company and on Broadway. Gurney's romantic comedy about a half-century-long friendship with benefits, as revealed through the couple's correspondence, usually spends its production dollars getting recognizable names into the pair of chairs and desks that compose its set. The names then read their characters' letters aloud and, while seated, adjust their body language and facial expressions so that we watch them age from grade school until sometime in the sort-of present (the play premiered in 1988)
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