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NEWS
April 14, 2016
ISSUE | LeSEAN McCOY Offensive to police A letter about an Old City bar fight involving former Eagles star LeSean McCoy and three off-duty police officers asked, "How could the two officers and a sergeant afford four bottles of champagne costing $1,050?" ("Sgt. PĂ©rignon," Friday). That seemed to imply that the officers had done something wrong. Many police officers have college degrees, and many work extra jobs to afford things they could not afford on a police salary. These men could have made smart investments, worked an extra job, or hit the lottery.
NEWS
April 14, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH CARE Doctors' role is key Dr. Peter Ubel's commentary about the complexity of health-insurance plans made the important point that caregivers are unprepared to help patients make cost-conscious decisions about their care ("Choices, plans overwhelming for patients," Friday). Yet many employers that adopt consumer-driven coverage pay little attention to the evidence that employees with high-deductible plans tend to cut back on beneficial as well as wasteful care. That jeopardizes patients' health and could undermine employers' savings when poorly managed health results in high-cost care or disability leaves.
NEWS
April 14, 2016
ISSUE | SODA TAX An unfair burden on small businesses As the owners of a small family business that has been in Philadelphia for 95 years, we feel compelled to speak out in opposition to the proposed 3-cents-an-ounce tax on soda and other sugary drinks ("TV ads attack proposed soda tax," Saturday). Mayor Kenney voted against this tax as a City Council member - what has changed? We have supported him, thinking he understood that small businesses are the backbone of the city's economy.
NEWS
April 14, 2016
ISSUE | CITY SCHOOLS Rhodes Elementary needs help After his visit to E.W. Rhodes Elementary School, Philadelphia Federation of Teachers president Jerry Jordan proclaimed that the school "doesn't need to be turned around again" ("Union opposes plan to turn around school," Thursday). Katie McGinty, Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate, called the North Philadelphia school an "inspiration. " The data tell a different story. In the 2014-15 school year, only 9 percent of its students were rated at least "proficient" on the state reading exam, and 1 percent - three students - were proficient in math.
NEWS
April 13, 2016
ISSUE | VISIT PHILA. City's champion Not since Benjamin Franklin has anyone done more to promote Philadelphia than Meryl Levitz and Visit Philadelphia ("Poor leadership," Thursday). As a former Center City business owner, I remember how frustrating it used to be trying to do business in the greatest city that nobody knew about. Visit Philadelphia has placed our city on the world stage: Our neighborhoods, restaurants, diversity, festivals, celebrations, arts, and cultural icons are finally recognized beyond our borders.
NEWS
April 13, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Power rests with informed voters Every potential voter for presidential candidates should read Daniel Pipes' commentary ("Trump's brand of politics? It's called neo-fascism," Friday). No matter how bullheaded and shortsighted Congress has seemingly become, we, the voters, still retain the power to fix our problems. Republican front-runner Donald Trump is thriving primarily on our collective disgust with Congress. We should remember that we voted into office every member of the Senate and House.
NEWS
April 13, 2016
ISSUE | POPE FRANCIS Not enough 'joy' The title " Amoris Laetitia ," or "The Joy of Love," seems strange for a document by Pope Francis that calls "irregular" relationships emblematic of those who live in an "imperfect manner" ("Pope urges compassion for gays, divorced," Saturday). Love is a loose term, and joy is an emotional reaction for those who are no longer distressed, angered, frightened, or disgusted by being judged "irregular" and "imperfect. " Compassion without celebration remains a form of denigration.
NEWS
April 13, 2016
ISSUE | BURIALS Bill would hike costs As a cemetery employee, I am in danger of losing my job. Pennsylvania Senate Bill 874, which was passed in October and is before a House committee, threatens the jobs and livelihoods of hundreds of cemetery employees around the state. The bill is designed to eliminate "pre-need sales," which cemeteries offer as an option for the purchase of burial plots, vaults, and coffins while customers are alive. It is a popular, efficient, and economically sound option that funeral homes don't provide.
NEWS
April 13, 2016
ISSUE | PRINCETON Wilson's legacy Princeton University exercised good sense in retaining President Woodrow Wilson's name on its school of public and international affairs and an undergraduate residential college ("Princeton will retain Wilson's name," April 5). Medieval popes had armies and concubines, and George Washington and Thomas Jefferson owned slaves. Should we rob them of their transcendent contributions to a better world? Who among us can rise above our times and be judged out of historical context?
NEWS
April 13, 2016
ISSUE | PRESCRIPTION DRUGS Imports make treatment affordable A commentary against drug importation did not mention the role of price increases ("Drug-import proposal puts people at risk," Wednesday). As a "poor senior" on a "tight, fixed-income budget," I am not as afraid of foreign imports as I am of a system that puts medications out of the reach of people who need them. An article in the AARP Bulletin stated, "According to recent estimates, more than one-quarter of prescriptions aren't filled because people can't afford them.
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