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NEWS
August 23, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
No city regulatory agency had the authority to review removal of the iconic PNB letters from their 60-year home atop a Center City tower on Sunday, according to city officials. The removal was announced last Friday, and on Sunday helicopters hovered over Broad and Chestnut Streets, lifting the 16-foot, 11/2-ton letters from the Art Deco high-rise built by the Wanamaker estate in 1930. The action came so swiftly that it caught many in the preservation and arts community off guard.
NEWS
August 22, 2014
ISSUE | SCHOOLS Lose the attitude How could an Inquirer editorial ("It isn't just city schools," Aug. 17) claim that "the same old anti-Philadelphia mentality" prevented legislation allowing a $2-a-pack city cigarette tax from passing (so far)? Surely the Editorial Board knows that both houses of the General Assembly have already passed bills allowing the city to increase the cigarette tax, and by large bipartisan majorities. Since the bills differ, they must be reconciled. But there's no reason to think they won't be reconciled when both houses are in session, and no reason to think it's "the same old anti-Philadelphia mentality" that is to blame.
NEWS
August 22, 2014
IN RESPONSE to Robert Bryan's remarks concerning black people "crying" racism: What planet do you live on? Better yet, what country? After 300 years of slavery followed by 100 years of segregation and discrimination, do you think racism magically disappeared after the 1964 Civil Rights Act? Let's fast-forward to current events. It appeared, after the election of the first African-American president, that we had moved to a postracial era. Hardly, with the racial and derogatory terms used against him and the apparent lack of respect throughout Congress toward him. This historical event has been mired in hate-filled actions and has spawned extremist groups that did not exist under any other presidents.
NEWS
August 21, 2014
REGARDING your editorial "Obstacle Courses" praising the efforts of Dr. William Hite, as you put it, to "fight on . . . behalf" of the schoolchildren of Philadelphia, my question is: Are you serious? The latest in a line of SRC-appointed CEOs of a school system under direct control of Harrisburg, Hite made it his first priority to close or consolidate dozens of district schools while continuing the expansion of privately managed charters. How does that promote public education? The "set-in-their ways" unions, meanwhile, have been working without a contract since last August, resulting in a wage freeze, and saving the district tens of millions.
NEWS
August 19, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
IT WAS BOTH strange and sad to see the iconic 16-foot, 3,000-pound letters atop the Pennsylvania National Bank building flying through Center City yesterday, onlookers said. But for the folks paying the bill, it was possibly sadder. That's because unexpected complications and safety concerns meant that a helicopter crew from Michigan could remove only three of the stainless-steel letters perched around the building's bell tower on Broad Street across from City Hall, and there was no telling when the others would come down.
NEWS
August 19, 2014
IS STU BYKOFSKY anti-Latino? He's answered his own question. This week, Stu Bykofsky asked how he could possibly be considered a "hysterical" "irrational" xenophobic anti-Latino columnist, charges he calls "baseless. " Let's review his actual record. Hysterical? Irrational? In the last few years alone, Bykofsky has written columns that questioned Councilwoman Maria Quinones-Sanchez's patriotism, stalked and confronted Latino-looking workers at construction sites, and admitted to pure speculation surrounding mysterious letters addressed to Latino surnames arriving at one man's house.
NEWS
August 19, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
A helicopter began lifting the PNB letters from the top of 1 South Broad St. on Sunday, closing streets and attracting onlookers as it dismantled a familiar part of Philadelphia's skyline. But the job - more difficult than expected because of the fragile condition of the letters - was suspended with nine still to come down. The large, white-and-blue letters must be removed because they are structurally unsound, said Barbara Nate, a spokeswoman for Wells Fargo. As part of its lease at 1 South Broad, Wells Fargo owns and cares for the signs, installed atop the high-rise by Philadelphia National Bank in the 1950s.
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