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NEWS
March 26, 2015
ISSUE | GOOD WORKS Prevention focus I had the privilege of working with Mildred Scott Olmsted when I was development director of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom's national office in Philadelphia ("Historical markers honor great women of Pa.," March 23). Although she was near the end of her century of life, she was completely clear-minded. Her explanation for her transition from social worker to activist for justice and peace holds a lesson that many today would benefit from.
NEWS
March 26, 2015
I AM COMPELLED to write this letter as the result of a judge's decision to allow a very hurtful anti-Islamic ad to be placed on SEPTA buses. I am well aware of the First Amendment right to free speech, but in my humble opinion to place an ad of Adolph Hitler on these vehicles is not only insensitive and incorrect, but also causes great harm to many people. A federal judge has ruled that since SEPTA has accepted religious, political and public-service advertising in the past, it cannot refuse ads that call for ending U.S. aid to Islamic countries that compare Islam to Hitler.
NEWS
March 25, 2015 | BY JOEL MATHIS & BEN BOYCHUK, Tribune News Service
    A BIPARTISAN trio of U.S. senators - New Jersey's Cory Booker, New York's Kirsten Gillibrand and Kentucky's Rand Paul - are sponsoring a bill to classify marijuana as a Schedule II drug, meaning that the federal government would allow it to be used as medicine. Some critics worry that such a bill could become a "gateway law" to full legalization of recreational weed; defenders say that sick patients need the pain relief best provided by marijuana. Should the bill get approval?
NEWS
March 25, 2015
ISSUE | SCHOOL OPTIONS Expanding hope for kids in Camden Growing up in Camden, I was no stranger to the public schools, and until this year my daughters went to our local school in North Camden ("Camden schools chief touts his achievement," March 16). Now three of them attend Mastery's North Camden Elementary, right up the street. The other week, I attended a neighborhood meeting hosted by the schools superintendent, Paymon Rouhanifard. He presented a dire reality, but also put on the table the possibility that schools like Mastery could partner with existing schools so that more families could have access to a quality neighborhood school.
NEWS
March 24, 2015
ISSUE | SCHOOL FUNDING Old-school answer What's with all the hoopla about U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan's epiphany and declaration that there exists this great funding divide between well-to-do schools and poor schools, with Pennsylvania leading the pack ("Pa. tops the nation in school-spending gap," March 14)? I thought money didn't matter to racing to the top. Since No Child Left Behind was enacted, reform was all about enabling choice - called the civil rights issue of the day - and accountability.
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | BY BLONDELL REYNOLDS BROWN
  EVERY YEAR since 1987, Congress has designated the month of March to celebrate the contributions and accomplishments of women and to learn about the long road to gender equality paved by the courageous women who came before us. Women continue to break glass ceilings in all areas of life. Consider the amazing achievements of women in the last year: *  Janet Yellen became the first woman to serve as the Chair of the Federal Reserve Board in its 102-year history. * Last summer, it took a 13-year-old woman from Philadelphia to teach the world that girls can throw just as well as boys.
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The messages the company received were the usual sort. A few impatient customers asked the company to speed up their orders. One paid off a bill. Another apologized for not having the money just yet. One message demanded the company pay money it owed. What makes the messages unusual - and precious - are the dates on the letters, 1834, and to whom they were addressed, the family of Rebecca Lukens, the nation's first female industrialist. "We're all aquiver because this [letter]
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hope T. Schwab, 64, of Wayne, a former banking manager who on learning that she had a brain tumor embraced the rest of her life with an ambitious string of adventures, died Wednesday, March 18, of a glioblastoma in Florida. In March 2010, six months after she was diagnosed, Mrs. Schwab wrote a letter to her adult daughters, Rachel Turbet and Diana Himmelstein. The letter was designed to "keep teaching and guiding us, even if she wasn't around," Turbet said. Mrs. Schwab's husband, Gary, said nothing could slow her down.
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