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Lettuce

FOOD
January 10, 1990 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
Major food retailers offered super sale prices on canned goods, frozen foods, meats and other food items this week to help soften the blow of freeze- escalated produce prices on shoppers' pocketbooks. They did such a good job, in fact, that the total cost of the 35-item representative grocery list tracked in this monthly survey actually dropped, by 1.6 percent, from $51.50 in December to $50.67 on Sunday. Icy weather in Florida pushed fresh cabbage and tomatoes up more than double in price at most markets.
NEWS
October 15, 1997 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! I am interested in obtaining the recipe for the Maytag Buttermilk Blue Cheese Salad served at the America Bar and Grill in Chester Springs. This is a delicious salad, which alone warrants a trip to this excellent new restaurant. The salad includes walnuts, bacon pieces and a very unique buttermilk dressing. Kimberly M. Thelman Chester Springs Dear Mrs. Thelman, Chef Dan Frank earned his stripes as a chef in some of the area's finer French restaurants, including Taquet, Passerelle and La Truffe.
NEWS
August 12, 1988 | By Dwight Ott, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jimmy Ro of Philadelphia knows firsthand the effect of the recent drought and its aftermath on consumer pocketbooks. Yesterday, Ro, 26, showed Arthur Brown Jr., the New Jersey agriculture secretary, around his vegetable stand in the Reading Terminal Market, so Brown could see for himself. Amid the tomatoes and lettuce, Ro has watched produce prices double and even triple. For instance, he said, tomatoes that once sold for a dollar a pound now sell for twice that amount despite his best efforts to keep prices low. Ro, who manages Ro & Sons Produce in the bustling Reading Terminal Market, was one of the produce sellers Brown visited yesterday.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
George the goose has been losing his girth. His friends are worried. The brown-feathered bird, who for the last several years has roosted on a half-sunken barge beside the Moshulu at Penn's Landing, hasn't been eating like he used to. Not the lettuce that maintenance worker Tom Jones brings in the morning. Nor the corn muffins, pretzels and bread delivered by other goose fans and friends. "It's not that we haven't been feeding him. We have," Jones said yesterday, casting a long, fretful look at the slender goose, who was poking his prominent black beak into the soft, brown feathers covering his back.
NEWS
December 14, 2006 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Richards, 17, said he likes his Taco Bell cheese fiesta potatoes too much to be frightened by a little E. coli bacteria outbreak. "I may go back for seconds," boasted the husky bespectacled youth from Princeton as he stood in the middle of yesterday's lunchtime hustle and bustle at the Cherry Hill Mall food court. Minutes later, he eagerly dove into a second basket of thick, greasy cheese potatoes that would have alarmed some even without an E. coli threat. "It's like drugs," said one customer, watching.
NEWS
May 10, 1993 | By MIKE ROYKO
A cheerful young lady called and said: "Hi, this is the Hard Rock Cafe. We just read your column, so we're inviting you to come over and try our veggie burger. " She was referring to the column I wrote heaping disgust and ridicule on the anti-beef fanatics who are trying to bully McDonald's into adding a vegetable burger to their menu. I asked the caller if the Hard Rock Cafe is the place where they blast hard rock music. "Yes, have you been here?" No, and I must decline your invitation.
FOOD
February 25, 1987 | By LIBBY GOLDSTEIN, Special to the Daily News
There's something about snow that sends me running for my catalogs (and calculator and checkbook). Snow somehow speaks to my internal clock and says, "Order now. You've been reading long enough. " Well, looking at pictures (in the catalog and in my head), anyway. The big snow we had this week said, "Get to it. If you don't, your seeds won't come in time to get started. " I'd bought the new fluorescent bulbs for my cellar growing place and a new heating cable (my banana and cardamon and lemon grass are on it, so I guess I'll need another for seed starting)
FOOD
February 28, 1988 | The Inquirer Staff
A quarter of a century after Betty Friedan ignited the feminist movement with The Feminine Mystique, women are still doing almost all the cooking and grocery shopping, according to an extensive survey conducted by the New York Times. Responses from 1,870 people, interviewed by telephone, showed that even though more women are in the work force, have less time at home and have been campaigning to get their husbands to share household chores, they are still the ones who pay attention to how, when, what and where their families eat. Among married couples questioned, only 18 percent of the men said they did the main food shopping for the family.
FOOD
May 18, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
Cookbooks and causes often go together, since recipe collections are a popular way of raising money for charity. WPEN-AM, a longtime supporter of the Leukemia Society of America, made its favorite non-profit the beneficiary when it gathered recipes from staff and listeners for "The WPEN Cookbook. " The Big Band/Adult Standard station has more than a passing interest in helping researchers find a cure for leukemia. It lost one of its most popular on-air personalities, Ken Garland, to the disease two years ago. Beneficial Savings Bank underwrote the publishing costs for the cookbook, so all sale proceeds go to the Leukemia Society.
NEWS
September 26, 1990 | By ROXANA PIERSON
Last spring, when a co-worker informed me that there were garden plots available at Gloucester County College, I couldn't wait to get started. Replete with glossy seed-catalogue pictures, I enlisted my neighbors, Rich and Michelle, and together we rented a 25-by-75-foot plot. Visions of sugar peas, Jersey tomatoes and Silver Queen corn danced in our heads as we prowled the garden stores and argued over what we should plant. We sowed our seeds ever so carefully and worried over our buds like expectant parents.
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