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NEWS
September 26, 1990 | By ROXANA PIERSON
Last spring, when a co-worker informed me that there were garden plots available at Gloucester County College, I couldn't wait to get started. Replete with glossy seed-catalogue pictures, I enlisted my neighbors, Rich and Michelle, and together we rented a 25-by-75-foot plot. Visions of sugar peas, Jersey tomatoes and Silver Queen corn danced in our heads as we prowled the garden stores and argued over what we should plant. We sowed our seeds ever so carefully and worried over our buds like expectant parents.
FOOD
July 5, 1995 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
When it comes to salads, for the '90s and beyond, sales appear to be in the bag. In the "controlled-atmosphere" bag, that is. These bags have helped make packaged salad fixings the fastest growing segment of produce sales. And they rank very high for rapid growth storewide as well, trailing flavored teas only slightly. "Salads have really taken off since the first of the year," said Mary Ellen Gowin, spokeswoman for ShopRite, the chain that added its own store- brand salad packs to an increasingly crowded market last fall.
NEWS
May 25, 1986 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
With its high visibility along Lancaster Avenue, Baxter's Saloon & Eatery is bound to catch your eye. But you probably should just blink and keep going, for this new Berwyn restaurant offers haphazardly served processed food and is hardly worth a visit; indeed, with its emphasis on the saloon rather than the eatery, Baxter's seems more attuned to people meeting after work than for serious dining. Astonishingly, Baxter's seems to have pretensions of grandeur by asserting that it is a "regular" restaurant with standard entrees; unfortunately, the menu shipped over from the Baxter's outlet in Paoli lists only six "dinner specials" among a host of finger-food items such as potato skins, nachos, cheese sticks or chicken strips, appetizers designed for nibbling with one hand while holding a drink in the other.
NEWS
April 19, 1987 | By John V.R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
The setting sun streaks the silvery Delaware River with red; abandoned pilings jut skyward as the city lights of Wilmington twinkle in the gathering dusk. That is the springtime view through the picture windows of the Riverview Inn, a comfortable riverside restaurant in Pennsville that has become Salem County's premier dining place. With soft peach and green colors, the huge main dining room exudes a quiet, restful atmosphere, even on busy weekend nights. The big windows that face the Delaware are framed with woodwork stained light green, while matching latticework embraces the doorways.
FOOD
July 27, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
The first surprising thing about the Old Original Bookbinder's Restaurant Cookbook ($12.95) is that the author, Judith Frazin, is from California. The second is that this restaurant, so associated with seafood, has so many meat, poultry and pasta recipes in its cookbook. Proprietor John E. Taxin explained that Frazin, a family friend, took on the task of collecting a new group of recipes because the first cookbook was "so outdated. " It was published more than 30 years ago, making it older than Taxin, the third generation of his family to run Bookbinder's.
FOOD
March 30, 1994 | By Sharon MacKenzie, FOR THE INQUIRER
Healthy eating is a goal for just about everybody these days. Green salads, plenty of vegetables and low-fat alternatives to meat are the features of this month's Affordable Feast. This simple Southern-style meal for four is nutritionally correct, except perhaps for its sinful dessert. The dishes are all easy to prepare from supermarket ingredients at a cost of under $20. Here is our menu for this month: COMBINATION GREEN SALAD MIXED FISH CREOLE CHEESE RICE SOUTHERN PRALINES Combination Green Salad is a fresh meal starter based on three green vegetables.
NEWS
November 1, 1992 | By John V. R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With an incomparable setting and exciting, almost spectacular, cuisine, the new Perkiomen Bridge Hotel & Restaurant is nearly in a class by itself. After being closed for three years, the charming Collegeville place was reopened May 6. Part of its wonderful rambling building dates to 1699. That was the same year that a graceful stone bridge, still standing, was built across the Perkiomen Creek; a duplicate of the bridge is in France. It is difficult to decide which is more impressive, the setting or the cuisine.
NEWS
September 25, 1987 | BY PETE DEXTER
Something happens to my stomach when I see rich guys who own sports franchises acting as if they owned the players. Something happens to my stomach when I see rich guys who own sports franchises accepting televised congratulations for the championships their teams have won. Something happens everytime George Steinbrenner (Yankees) or Harold Katz (76ers) or any of the others opens his mouth to complain about the "character" of the players they employ. If character counted, half of the jock sniffers who own professional teams wouldn't own their own shoes.
FOOD
May 22, 1988 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Don't expect to discover Chinatown's newest Vietnamese restaurant. Although Capital Vietnam is less than two months old, crowds already have found it, and unless you arrive in midafternoon or late evening, you may well have to wait for a table. Capital's decor is virtually nonexistent, and when I made the mistake of looking into the kitchen on a second visit, I was relieved that my mother hadn't caught sight of the clutter and chaos when she and I first went there. The largely Asian clientele obviously goes there for authentic eats and not for style.
NEWS
July 19, 1991 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
It's only two blocks long, but it has its own post office, a bank, a credit bureau, a daily newspaper, security guards, street cleaners, millionaires, paupers and a restaurant that serves pot roast at 6 a.m. On the premises are a force of 20 federal experts to referee disputes and a full-time Philadelphia cop to referee disputes that pass beyond just words. It's the Philadelphia Fresh Food Terminal, where the law of supply and demand operates in its purest form and the action is more intense than at a casino.
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