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Lettuce

FOOD
March 26, 2009
Salad as still life Continuity is the watchword at Friday Saturday Sunday, at 35 now one of the city's longest-running and loyally patronized dining rooms. Upstairs at the Tank Bar, you can still get the signature jumbo lump crab cake, unfiddled with, just the way you remember it. But owner Weaver Lilley isn't above adding a new wrinkle, or in the current case, a new salad celebrating the Art Museum's "Cézanne and Beyond" exhibit, running through May 17. Lilley, a "big Cézanne fan," said he studied the artist's still lifes to come up with a salad resonant of their mood.
LIVING
February 15, 2008 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Peas and beans aren't the only early birds in the garden. In just a few weeks, lettuce seeds can be sown directly into the ground, too. Peas' and beans' great big seed-balls go in around St. Patrick's Day. Lettuce's turn is mid-April, a good month before the bulk of our spring planting season begins. But you have to be careful. Lettuce seeds are the size of fleas. You can pretend they're peas or beans and lay each one carefully into the garden, barely covering them with soil, and hoping you don't sneeze.
NEWS
July 22, 2007 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
First-time visitors to the city's new (well, in a manner of speaking) Headhouse Farmers Market a few weeks ago fell hungrily on the assembled bounty, making short work, in particular, of the somewhat-exotic harvest from Queens Farm. The farm's name is curiously at odds with its produce, which leans heavily to the East - long-leafed Chinese lettuce (now gone by), tender edamame beans, homegrown shiitake mushrooms, and bok choy, supplementing the more common bunches of basil and fava beans, snow peas, and not-so-usual purslane.
NEWS
December 14, 2006 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Richards, 17, said he likes his Taco Bell cheese fiesta potatoes too much to be frightened by a little E. coli bacteria outbreak. "I may go back for seconds," boasted the husky bespectacled youth from Princeton as he stood in the middle of yesterday's lunchtime hustle and bustle at the Cherry Hill Mall food court. Minutes later, he eagerly dove into a second basket of thick, greasy cheese potatoes that would have alarmed some even without an E. coli threat. "It's like drugs," said one customer, watching.
NEWS
December 14, 2006 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shredded lettuce has emerged as the most likely source of the bacteria that have sickened at least 71 people who ate at Taco Bells in four states, federal health officials said yesterday. "Could it change? It's possible," said Christopher Braden, a medical epidemiologist with the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "but we're fairly confident in the information. " The assertion is not based on evidence from testing but rather from the CDC's statistical analysis of what victims ate compared with what was eaten by companions who did not get sick.
NEWS
April 23, 2006 | By Kathryn Quigley FOR THE INQUIRER
Lettuce is for more than just salad to the students in the Greenhouse Class at Northern Burlington County Regional High School in Columbus. Students are growing black-seeded Simpson lettuce in an exercise in hydroponics. The lettuce is nourished in a solution rather than in soil. Keith Dannucci, the agricultural science teacher who leads the class, said the students had already harvested one crop of lettuce. They took it home to their families, who ate it and pronounced it "delicious.
NEWS
February 27, 2006 | By John Ferlaine
I should have known better. When I saw a long line of customers waiting in the express-checkout aisle at the Cherry Hill Pathmark the other day, I decided to try out a self-checkout machine nearby. Only a few people waited there. I got through the first few items OK. All you have to do is scan items and place them in a shopping bag. No sweat - until I got to the last item, a head of romaine lettuce. I could not find the item number on it, and kicked myself. It was the same mistake I had made during my first encounter with a grocery store's self-checkout machine some time before.
NEWS
February 12, 2006 | Inquirer Suburban Staff
What we like: This is a small spot with a big menu along Bryn Mawr's main drag. Inside the restaurant with large windows, patrons order at the counter, and a friendly wait staff brings meals to tables that seat two to six. The baked goat-cheese salad has fresh greens surrounded by Italian bread slices topped with baked goat cheese. Served with a choice of dressing, it costs $6.99. The grilled-chicken wrap and roast-turkey wrap feature tender, white, thinly sliced meats; chunks of cheese with tomato and lettuce; and a homemade, creamy Caesar dressing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2002 | By LAUREN MCCUTCHEON For the Daily News
Ralph Costobile may be the lunch chef at the Four Seasons' elegant Fountain Restaurant and Swann Lounge, but he started out as a mere onlooker in his grandmothers' South Philadelphia kitchens. Growing up at Passyunk and Dickinson, Costobile watched his parents' mothers bake cinnamon cookies, cheesecake and Easter bread, and prepare the feast of seven fishes for Christmas Eve. In the summer, young Ralph was allowed to help jar tomatoes for traditional gravy. Remembering what it was like to be a kid in his grandmas' kitchens, the chef devised a sandwich that's easy (and safe)
FOOD
March 27, 2002 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
With the price of iceberg lettuce climbing to $2.99 a head in local supermarkets, sales of convenient bagged salads are booming. And packaged organic greens have seen a particularly healthy spurt. That's because long-term contracts between suppliers and supermarkets have kept most of those packaged-salad combinations at their regular price - coincidentally, also an average of $2.99. It's been a warm winter on the East Coast. But the January frost damaged a big chunk of the winter lettuce crop in the key growing areas around Yuma, Ariz.
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