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Lettuce

NEWS
August 13, 1993 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
I eat more brought-from-home lunches at my desk than you might imagine. So I felt positively decadent the other day to be sitting next to a faux waterfall at midday, digging into a platter of roast beef and mashed potatoes, and listening to suede-voiced Astrud Gilberto sing "The Girl from Ipanema. " Ahhhh. The place was Brasil's, Philadelphia's only Brazilian restaurant, which manages to evoke that colorful country and culture, even though the bustling Philadelphia waterfront and historic Society Hill lie just outside the front door.
FOOD
June 20, 1993 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
Father's Day and salad days are in season together. Here are two great salads to serve Dad and to keep on file. Both are hearty, easy-to-make recipes that travel well. Steak Salad begins with a strip steak marinated in teriyaki sauce, oil and vinegar. It is grilled and served with scallions, capers and mustard vinaigrette. The salad can be prepared a day in advance and refrigerated, but the flavor is better if it's served at room temperature. Chicken salad is another ideal Father's Day entree.
NEWS
May 22, 1993 | By John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Part of the evidence was swallowed, but Camden police yesterday collared their man. Alfonzo K. Starks was arrested after he was locked inside a check-cashing store in Camden where he had eaten $200 he had stolen from a customer in the store moments earlier. Police said Starks had taken a total of $500. Starks, 35, of the first block of South 27th Street, Camden, was charged with robbery and aggravated assault. He was being held in the Camden County jail after he failed to post $15,000 bail.
FOOD
May 19, 1993 | By Faith Willinger, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's easy to spot in salads at trendy restaurants. It's newer than sun- dried tomatoes, hipper than arugula: the purplish-red and white-veined leaves of another easily mispronounced Italian designer lettuce. But learning to say rah-DEE-key-oh may be the only stumbling block. Red radicchio is easy to cook and tastes good grilled, braised, roasted or stir- fried. It also works well in risotto or pasta sauce. A bit on the bitter side, it is food for grown-ups. And it's low in calories.
NEWS
May 10, 1993 | By MIKE ROYKO
A cheerful young lady called and said: "Hi, this is the Hard Rock Cafe. We just read your column, so we're inviting you to come over and try our veggie burger. " She was referring to the column I wrote heaping disgust and ridicule on the anti-beef fanatics who are trying to bully McDonald's into adding a vegetable burger to their menu. I asked the caller if the Hard Rock Cafe is the place where they blast hard rock music. "Yes, have you been here?" No, and I must decline your invitation.
FOOD
March 17, 1993 | By Ethel Hofman, FOR THE INQUIRER
There's a strong possibility that the price of a head of lettuce could go as high as $2, as a result of recent floods in southwestern Arizona that damaged more that 20,000 acres of cropland. Because Arizona is a main winter supply source, lettuce prices have been skyocketing and probably will continue to do so until early-spring lettuce from California arrives in the markets. You can avoid the high prices and at the same time easily achieve the "strive for 5" servings of fresh produce recommended by health experts by picking up on a variety of other vegetables and fruits.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1993 | By David Johnston, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tired of digging the lettuce out of your wallet to pay for the salad variety? Well, plan on about three more weeks of high prices for the green stuff, a commodity known for its wild price swings because it cannot be stored to even out supply and demand. For the last two weeks, torrential rains have flooded Arizona lettuce fields, where much of the nation's early March lettuce crop is grown, driving prices skyward. Two weeks ago, a head of lettuce at an Acme market cost you 69 cents.
LIVING
January 8, 1993 | By Lucinda Fleeson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The January crop of nursery and seed catalogues starts arriving at a time when most gardeners have had a rest for a month or two. They've begun to forget long hours of weeding and all the vows about being more modest this year. But when the garden is gray and dead, those vows tend to fade in the face of dizzyingly gorgeous catalogue photographs accompanied by eloquent, hyperbolic descriptions. The actual work of spring planting is still a few months away; winter is a good time for ambitions to run wild and dreams to grow grandiose, a time to take stock of all the mistakes made last year and to plan anew.
NEWS
November 1, 1992 | By John V. R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With an incomparable setting and exciting, almost spectacular, cuisine, the new Perkiomen Bridge Hotel & Restaurant is nearly in a class by itself. After being closed for three years, the charming Collegeville place was reopened May 6. Part of its wonderful rambling building dates to 1699. That was the same year that a graceful stone bridge, still standing, was built across the Perkiomen Creek; a duplicate of the bridge is in France. It is difficult to decide which is more impressive, the setting or the cuisine.
FOOD
September 9, 1992 | by William Rice, Special to the Daily News
No other vegetable is capable of engendering such love and disdain within the same person as the tomato (or tomatoe, to the right wing of the Kitchen Party). Surely there are those who hate turnips or Brussels sprouts more than tomatoes, but never will they love them under any circumstance. Feed the tomato-hater of January a perfectly ripe tomato in August, and he or she will purr like a kitten. As a vegetable (though defined in dictionaries as a fruit), the tomato is the third most popular in America (behind the potato and iceberg lettuce)
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