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Leverage

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BUSINESS
February 16, 1999 | By Miriam Hill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As MBA students at the Wharton School, Matthew Wooldridge and Bojan Stoyanov have been trained to act on what they think is a good deal. So, when interest rates dropped as returns on stocks soared, they each borrowed about $10,000 through credit cards and other loans to invest in stocks. Wooldridge, 28, and Stoyanov, 36, know that most financial planners say borrowing to invest is a bad idea. They are schooled in the ways that debt, more commonly called leverage at Wharton, can magnify both investment risks and returns.
NEWS
July 29, 1998 | By G. Richard Shell
Donald Trump is one of the world's best negotiators. Vera Coking is a slightly eccentric Atlantic City woman who has driven him to distraction by refusing to sell him the land on which her boardinghouse is built so he can expand his Trump Plaza casino. Their story is a classic study that illustrates two important lessons about negotiation. Lesson 1: Negotiation is more than haggling. People think that to be good at negotiating, you must be a great haggler. You must be smooth, bold and calculating.
SPORTS
May 6, 1987 | By RICH HOFMANN, Daily News Sports Writer
It still is too early to call it the Ron Jaworski Victory Tour. But with each plane trip that Jaworski takes, with each workout, it has become evident that the interest in his services around the NFL is growing. The latest: Jaworski worked out yesterday for the Miami Dolphins, who are involved in a contract dispute with veteran backup Don Strock and might be looking for a replacement. Dolphins coach Don Shula said he was impressed. "I thought Ron did well," Shula said.
NEWS
February 11, 1995 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Will the $79 million in federal empowerment zone money that will flow to Philadelphia be enough to fund community groups' ambitious plans? Only if they make good use of the magic of "leverage. " In West Philadelphia, neighborhood representatives have come up with an impressive list of 77 ideas they'd like to see become reality thanks to their designation as an empowerment zone area. Some examples: Design and create a neighborhood automotive rehabilitation and scrap business.
SPORTS
June 2, 2011 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
A court hearing Friday could finally bring a definitive ruling in the NFL lockout and create the kind of leverage that could force a compromise after months of preliminary jousting. The hearing in St. Louis will not produce an immediate ruling - that will likely take several weeks - but once a decision is in, it will more firmly establish who has the legal upper hand in the dispute between NFL owners and players. That could compel the losing side to give ground and set the stage for a compromise to end the owners' nearly three-month-old lockout.
NEWS
May 12, 1999
Before John F. Street left the City Council to run for mayor, he represented Philadelphia's Fifth District, stretching from Center City to North Philadelphia. No matter what happens next Tuesday, Mr. Street's seat will have to be filled by the voters. Seeking it are Mr. Street's top Council aide, Darrell Clarke, and Julie Welker, a Fairmount real estate agent who ran two credible campaigns in the past. No doubt Mr. Clarke served his former boss well. Mr. Clarke certainly knows the ins and outs of government.
NEWS
July 13, 1996 | By Rebecca W. Rimel
Never has there been more pressure on foundations to come to the rescue on so many fronts. With government beating a retreat, philanthropy is feeling increasing pressure to fill the void in health care, culture, education and social services. But even if all the foundations in the country were to pool their resources, they couldn't begin to close the breach. In 1995, foundation giving to the nonprofit sector totaled $10.4 billion. While that sounds like lot of money, it's minuscule compared to the $241 billion provided by the federal government to states and localities for social programs and the nearly $143 billion contributed by individuals.
NEWS
September 10, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I recently received some exciting, but private, news that I shared with my family members. Unfortunately, threatening to share sensitive information with others is a weapon some members of my family have used in conflicts. When I told each group, I explicitly stated my desire to tell the others personally. I recently found out that, despite my clear communication of my own expectations, one part of my family told the other. I'm upset they didn't respect what I had asked, but don't want to make this into a bigger deal than it is. Unfortunately, this has made me lose trust in some members of my family.
SPORTS
February 28, 2013 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
FORT MYERS, Fla. - Wally Joyner stuck out his left fist for a bump Wednesday as Domonic Brown dashed past the batting cage. When Brown poked one the opposite way a few minutes later, Joyner nodded his head and said, "Atta boy. " In between batting-practice rounds, Joyner mimicked a swing to make a point while Brown watched. A day earlier, Brown credited his hot spring start to Joyner, the Phillies' new assistant hitting coach. "It seemed like God maybe sent an angel down toward me," Brown said, citing the strong connection the two made.
NEWS
February 9, 1987 | By Larry Borska, Special to The Inquirer
Despite his muscular chest and thick arms, Penncrest's Garrett Wright simply doesn't have the leverage top-notch wrestlers need. And the situation will never get any better. Cerebral palsy, which has rendered Wright's legs virtually useless since birth, prevents him from having any leverage at all. But he said, "Handicapped people can't be limited by their handicaps. You have to live your life. "When you're handicapped - at least like I am - you can do just about anything.
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NEWS
April 30, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden was named one of eight new "Promise Zones" by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development on Tuesday, meaning the city will receive help in securing federal funding for revitalization efforts. The Promise Zone program, initiated last year by President Obama's administration, is aimed at creating jobs, reducing crime, and improving schools. The program does not come with any immediate funding but asks communities to work with businesses and civic leaders to develop an improvement plan.
SPORTS
February 28, 2013 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
FORT MYERS, Fla. - Wally Joyner stuck out his left fist for a bump Wednesday as Domonic Brown dashed past the batting cage. When Brown poked one the opposite way a few minutes later, Joyner nodded his head and said, "Atta boy. " In between batting-practice rounds, Joyner mimicked a swing to make a point while Brown watched. A day earlier, Brown credited his hot spring start to Joyner, the Phillies' new assistant hitting coach. "It seemed like God maybe sent an angel down toward me," Brown said, citing the strong connection the two made.
NEWS
February 12, 2013
For the first time since Election Day, President Obama is on the defensive. That's because on March 1, automatic spending cuts ("sequestration") go into effect - $1.2 trillion over 10 years, half from domestic (discretionary) programs, half from defense. The idea had been proposed and promoted by the White House during the July 2011 debt-ceiling negotiations. The political calculation was that such draconian defense cuts would drive the GOP to offer concessions. It backfired.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Andrew Taylor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - There's a growing sense of resignation that the country's political leaders will be unable or unwilling to find a way around looming automatic spending cuts, despite fresh signs the trims would threaten the recovering economy. On one side are conservative Republicans, outnumbered and frustrated, who see the painfully large cuts as leverage in their battle to force Democrats into concessions on the budget. On the other side are President Obama and his Democratic allies, who are pressing to replace some of the cuts with new tax revenue.
NEWS
September 10, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I recently received some exciting, but private, news that I shared with my family members. Unfortunately, threatening to share sensitive information with others is a weapon some members of my family have used in conflicts. When I told each group, I explicitly stated my desire to tell the others personally. I recently found out that, despite my clear communication of my own expectations, one part of my family told the other. I'm upset they didn't respect what I had asked, but don't want to make this into a bigger deal than it is. Unfortunately, this has made me lose trust in some members of my family.
NEWS
June 5, 2012
Q. A number of years ago, we bought a refrigerator from a major appliance store and paid with a check. Almost from Day 1, it gave us trouble. They sent out a repairman who made a temporary fix. It failed. Twice more, they sent a repairman who could not get it to work right. We tried very hard to get a replacement, even writing to the manufacturer. All we got in response was a statement that they would repair but not replace the unit. It now works, but sometimes decides for itself to overcool for a day or two. Last month, we bought a new big-screen TV. Fortunately, we charged it on our credit card.
SPORTS
February 14, 2012
It was called Philadelphia Regional In-Home Sports & Movies, and it was ahead of its time. The Phillies started televising their games on Prism in 1977, long before regional cable sports networks funded massive spending sprees in baseball - as in this postseason. The Texas Rangers and Los Angeles Angels have spent lavishly on free agents because of TV contracts that total approximately $4.6 billion. In Philadelphia, the Phillies have made good money dating back to Prism, the original joint-venture operation with Comcast SportsNet, and subsequent rights deal.
SPORTS
October 23, 2011 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Once upon a time, collective bargaining actually saved the National Basketball Association, and did so at a moment when everyone agreed that it was, for the most part, a good thing. It was 1983, and NBA teams were hemorrhaging money as their little, antiquated arenas, modest ticket prices, and more modest television revenues could not keep pace with salary increases made possible by the advent of free agency in the previous decade. Things were bad, and there was serious talk of some franchises going out of business or, less drastic but not so appealing either, operating as second-division teams without hope of ever improving their station.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Heist movies live and die by their ability to find the right balance between drama and comedy. The heroes are usually pretty shabby, tragic figures, but their best cons are nothing less than masterpieces in theatrical farce. TNT's terrific drama Leverage , about a group of con artists who play Robin Hood in modern-day Boston, has the perfect mix. The show's latest season, Leverage: Third Season , was released this week, just ahead of the fourth-season premiere on TNT. Leverage star Timothy Hutton puts down Leverage 's success to the peculiar energy whipped up by the show's ensemble cast, which includes a supremely flirtatious Gina Bellman as confidence trickster Sophie, Christian Kane as bruiser Eliot, Aldis Hodge as the computer and tech head Hardison, and a remarkable Beth Riesgraf as the emotionally challenged safecracker Parker.
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By CHRIS BRENNAN, brennac@phillynews.com 215-854-5973
Mayor Nutter may save the day with new taxes to close the Philadelphia School District's budget deficit, but it will cost him. Nutter will surely be nailed politically for raising taxes in three of the four years of his first term. In the short-term, Nutter's call to tax sugar-sweetened beverages could push former Mayor John Street to challenge him in an independent run for mayor. Street was a vocal opponent of a similar soda tax proposed by Nutter last year. In the long-term, candidates seeking to follow Nutter as mayor in 2015 if he wins a second term this year will probably position themselves as public servants who hold the line on taxes.
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