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Lgbt Community

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NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
At an iconic Center City gay bar, mayoral candidate James F. Kenney greeted some of the leading LGBT advocates in the city, calling them his family and pledging to continue to protect their rights, in life and love, at a fund-raiser for his campaign. A drag queen manned the DJ station at Woody's, rainbow flags flew, and a slide show of Kenney through the years played on the TVs. Twenty years ago, such a campaign event likely would not have happened. Today, LGBT voters are seen as a key bloc of politically minded, progressive supporters who are expected to turn out - particularly this year, when two openly gay candidates are running for City Council.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
GEORGE WAS the first openly gay man I knew. But over the years, I often wondered if the George I knew as a kid was the same man others did, the ones at the other end of a morning cab ride he'd take from my aunt's neighborhood in the Bronx to his job - in banking, I think - somewhere in Manhattan. I'd watch him as he got into the cab, always in a suit, serious and reserved as he folded his huge frame into the back seat and told the driver where to go. At the end of the workday, another cab would drop him off and I'd watch again as he'd disappear into his apartment only to emerge shortly after in the outfit he favored in the summer: jean shorts, a colorful tank top, and chancletas - sandals that punctuated every step as he made his way to my aunt's apartment.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
District Attorney Seth Williams on Tuesday led the first of a series of forums to improve relations between law enforcement and the lesbian and gay community in Philadelphia. The focus of the forum, held at the District Attorney's Office, was safety and crime prevention, but it reflected a trend in law enforcement to better serve and be sensitive to the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) community. The Police Department recently established a policy to be more respectful to people who are transgendered.
NEWS
October 3, 2014
I MAKE NO secret of the fact that I'm (an imperfect) Catholic. That makes for interesting conversations with strangers who know me only by what I've written, particularly former Catholics who still can't believe I go to Mass. So many of them wonder why I don't speak out against the horrible scourge of child abuse that became one of the preferred media obsessions over the past decade and a half. I understand why they ask, because to people whose only knowledge of the church was gleaned from the Baltimore Catechism back in the 1960s - before they abandoned the pews (and the Colts abandoned Baltimore)
NEWS
April 15, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mark Segal had been biting his nails, waiting for the call. Thursday morning, he was drinking a mug of sweet vanilla coffee in his den above the offices of the Philadelphia Gay News, when the phone finally rang. His dream project, an affordable housing complex welcoming to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender seniors, had won a competitive bid for an $11 million state tax credit. "I've been trying not to cry," Segal said Sunday, barely succeeding in holding back the kvell . For more than three years, the 61-year-old founder and publisher of PGN has been planning, lobbying, negotiating, collaborating and cajoling every social service agency, activist group and political leader he knows to make Philadelphia one of the first cities in the nation to meet the needs of the aging LGBT community.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
With Center City's "Gayborhood" and such community institutions as the Giovanni's Room bookstore, Philadelphia Gay News and the Equality Forum that annually draws tens of thousands to issue-events affecting sexual minorities, some might feel crimes based on sexual orientation are part of the past. Helen "Nellie" Fitzpatrick says otherwise. "It hasn't been my whole lifetime that it's been OK to be gay," said Fitzpatrick, 31, a prosecutor in the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office named last month as liaison to the city's LGBT - lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender - community.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rachel Levine stood tall in the doorway, offered a polite handshake, and took a seat at the L-shaped desk in her drab, blank slate of an office. The room, with its empty bookshelves, dual computer screens, and not much else, seemed appropriately open to possibility as the headquarters for a woman about to chart new territory. Levine, who has just been named Pennsylvania's physician general, spent most of her 57 years - at least outwardly - as a man. If the state Senate confirms her appointment, the doctor, who until a few years ago was known as Richard Levine, will become one of the nation's very few, openly transgender people in public office.
NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
It didn't take long for the uproar over religious-freedom laws in Indiana and Arkansas to reverberate in Pennsylvania. Democrats, including Gov. Wolf, grabbed onto the controversy this week to bolster their bid for a state ban on discrimination against members of the LGBT community. The proposal would make it illegal for businesses to fire workers or deny customers because they are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender. It would also offer protections beyond antidiscrimination measures already passed by more than 30 municipalities, including Philadelphia, Haverford, Abington, and New Hope.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
For former City Councilman James F. Kenney, Friday the 13th was anything but unlucky. The aspiring Philadelphia mayor received one of the biggest endorsements a candidate can land - from the Philadelphia Council, AFL-CIO - plus the backing of some of the city's LGBT leaders, representing a growing voter bloc, and the teachers' union. The AFL-CIO council is composed of more than 100 unions representing 130,000 workers in the public sector, private industry, and the building and construction trades.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
GEORGE WAS the first openly gay man I knew. But over the years, I often wondered if the George I knew as a kid was the same man others did, the ones at the other end of a morning cab ride he'd take from my aunt's neighborhood in the Bronx to his job - in banking, I think - somewhere in Manhattan. I'd watch him as he got into the cab, always in a suit, serious and reserved as he folded his huge frame into the back seat and told the driver where to go. At the end of the workday, another cab would drop him off and I'd watch again as he'd disappear into his apartment only to emerge shortly after in the outfit he favored in the summer: jean shorts, a colorful tank top, and chancletas - sandals that punctuated every step as he made his way to my aunt's apartment.
NEWS
April 6, 2015
ISSUE | INCLUSION Pa. must enact LGBT safeguards The passage of a so-called religious freedom law in Indiana presents Pennsylvania lawmakers with a unique opportunity to proclaim full human rights for all ("Inviting bigotry," April 2). Now is the time for Harrisburg to enact a comprehensive antidiscrimination law that ensures legal protection for members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community. As a religious leader, my faith calls me to affirm the inherent worth and dignity of all people.
NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
It didn't take long for the uproar over religious-freedom laws in Indiana and Arkansas to reverberate in Pennsylvania. Democrats, including Gov. Wolf, grabbed onto the controversy this week to bolster their bid for a state ban on discrimination against members of the LGBT community. The proposal would make it illegal for businesses to fire workers or deny customers because they are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender. It would also offer protections beyond antidiscrimination measures already passed by more than 30 municipalities, including Philadelphia, Haverford, Abington, and New Hope.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | Wendy Ruderman, Daily News Staff Writer
IT'S TOO EARLY to predict which of the mayoral candidates will be in or out come November. But one thing is clear, the six Democratic candidates, who are in a heated battle to win the May primary, think the LGBT vote could make or break them. "The LGBT vote in an urban community can make the difference between a win or a loss, so it doesn't surprise me that the candidates are doing aggressive outreach," said Marc Solomon, national campaign director of Freedom to Marry, which fights for the passage of same-sex legislation.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Council and judicial candidates touted progressive ideas and support of the LGBT community Wednesday night in a forum held by Liberty City Democrats. More than 20 candidates for judge and Council addressed the crowd at the William Way LGBT Community Center in three-minute speeches, and later fielded questions from the audience. Council incumbents including Kenyatta Johnson, W. Wilson Goode, and Blondell Reynolds Brown reminded the crowd that they had voted in favor of several successful LGBT-rights bills introduced over the last three years.
NEWS
March 17, 2015 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Many of the courses she is taking at Rutgers-Camden law school are about the law as it currently is, says Katie Lara. "Sexuality, Gender, Identity and the Law" is different, she says: It is about how social movements change laws. The course that has Lara and fellow students excited is inspired by what its creator calls "the great civil rights struggle of our era" - for LGBT rights. Rutgers professor Katie Eyer said she began teaching the elective about a year ago after she was approached by students interested in the law as it pertains to sexuality.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
At an iconic Center City gay bar, mayoral candidate James F. Kenney greeted some of the leading LGBT advocates in the city, calling them his family and pledging to continue to protect their rights, in life and love, at a fund-raiser for his campaign. A drag queen manned the DJ station at Woody's, rainbow flags flew, and a slide show of Kenney through the years played on the TVs. Twenty years ago, such a campaign event likely would not have happened. Today, LGBT voters are seen as a key bloc of politically minded, progressive supporters who are expected to turn out - particularly this year, when two openly gay candidates are running for City Council.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
For former City Councilman James F. Kenney, Friday the 13th was anything but unlucky. The aspiring Philadelphia mayor received one of the biggest endorsements a candidate can land - from the Philadelphia Council, AFL-CIO - plus the backing of some of the city's LGBT leaders, representing a growing voter bloc, and the teachers' union. The AFL-CIO council is composed of more than 100 unions representing 130,000 workers in the public sector, private industry, and the building and construction trades.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rachel Levine stood tall in the doorway, offered a polite handshake, and took a seat at the L-shaped desk in her drab, blank slate of an office. The room, with its empty bookshelves, dual computer screens, and not much else, seemed appropriately open to possibility as the headquarters for a woman about to chart new territory. Levine, who has just been named Pennsylvania's physician general, spent most of her 57 years - at least outwardly - as a man. If the state Senate confirms her appointment, the doctor, who until a few years ago was known as Richard Levine, will become one of the nation's very few, openly transgender people in public office.
NEWS
November 1, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
  They've become some of Pennsylvania's biggest out-of-state political contributors: a small group of multimillionaires - most of them gay - who want every state to allow same-sex marriage and to pass laws protecting LGBT rights. Since the mid-2000s, they have poured more than $1 million in campaign contributions into the commonwealth through Democratic organizations, buoying campaigns here for governor, attorney general, and seats in the General Assembly. The biggest donors include Tim Gill, a Colorado software entrepreneur; David Bohnett, a California technology tycoon; and Jon Stryker, heir to a medical-device fortune who lives in Michigan.
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