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NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
At an iconic Center City gay bar, mayoral candidate James F. Kenney greeted some of the leading LGBT advocates in the city, calling them his family and pledging to continue to protect their rights, in life and love, at a fund-raiser for his campaign. A drag queen manned the DJ station at Woody's, rainbow flags flew, and a slide show of Kenney through the years played on the TVs. Twenty years ago, such a campaign event likely would not have happened. Today, LGBT voters are seen as a key bloc of politically minded, progressive supporters who are expected to turn out - particularly this year, when two openly gay candidates are running for City Council.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
District Attorney Seth Williams on Tuesday led the first of a series of forums to improve relations between law enforcement and the lesbian and gay community in Philadelphia. The focus of the forum, held at the District Attorney's Office, was safety and crime prevention, but it reflected a trend in law enforcement to better serve and be sensitive to the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) community. The Police Department recently established a policy to be more respectful to people who are transgendered.
NEWS
October 3, 2014
I MAKE NO secret of the fact that I'm (an imperfect) Catholic. That makes for interesting conversations with strangers who know me only by what I've written, particularly former Catholics who still can't believe I go to Mass. So many of them wonder why I don't speak out against the horrible scourge of child abuse that became one of the preferred media obsessions over the past decade and a half. I understand why they ask, because to people whose only knowledge of the church was gleaned from the Baltimore Catechism back in the 1960s - before they abandoned the pews (and the Colts abandoned Baltimore)
NEWS
April 16, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mark Segal had been biting his nails, waiting for the call. Thursday morning, he was drinking a mug of sweet vanilla coffee in his den above the offices of the Philadelphia Gay News when the phone finally rang. His dream project, an affordable housing complex welcoming to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender seniors, had won a competitive bid for an $11 million state tax credit. "I've been trying not to cry," Segal said Sunday, barely succeeding in holding back the kvell . For more than three years, the 61-year-old founder and publisher of PGN has been planning, lobbying, negotiating, collaborating, and cajoling every social-service agency, activist group, and political leader he knows to make Philadelphia one of the first cities in the nation to meet the needs of the aging LGBT community.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
With Center City's "Gayborhood" and such community institutions as the Giovanni's Room bookstore, Philadelphia Gay News and the Equality Forum that annually draws tens of thousands to issue-events affecting sexual minorities, some might feel crimes based on sexual orientation are part of the past. Helen "Nellie" Fitzpatrick says otherwise. "It hasn't been my whole lifetime that it's been OK to be gay," said Fitzpatrick, 31, a prosecutor in the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office named last month as liaison to the city's LGBT - lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender - community.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rachel Levine stood tall in the doorway, offered a polite handshake, and took a seat at the L-shaped desk in her drab, blank slate of an office. The room, with its empty bookshelves, dual computer screens, and not much else, seemed appropriately open to possibility as the headquarters for a woman about to chart new territory. Levine, who has just been named Pennsylvania's physician general, spent most of her 57 years - at least outwardly - as a man. If the state Senate confirms her appointment, the doctor, who until a few years ago was known as Richard Levine, will become one of the nation's very few, openly transgender people in public office.
NEWS
March 17, 2015 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Many of the courses she is taking at Rutgers-Camden law school are about the law as it currently is, says Katie Lara. "Sexuality, Gender, Identity and the Law" is different, she says: It is about how social movements change laws. The course that has Lara and fellow students excited is inspired by what its creator calls "the great civil rights struggle of our era" - for LGBT rights. Rutgers professor Katie Eyer said she began teaching the elective about a year ago after she was approached by students interested in the law as it pertains to sexuality.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
For former City Councilman James F. Kenney, Friday the 13th was anything but unlucky. The aspiring Philadelphia mayor received one of the biggest endorsements a candidate can land - from the Philadelphia Council, AFL-CIO - plus the backing of some of the city's LGBT leaders, representing a growing voter bloc, and the teachers' union. The AFL-CIO council is composed of more than 100 unions representing 130,000 workers in the public sector, private industry, and the building and construction trades.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Council and judicial candidates touted progressive ideas and support of the LGBT community Wednesday night in a forum held by Liberty City Democrats. More than 20 candidates for judge and Council addressed the crowd at the William Way LGBT Community Center in three-minute speeches, and later fielded questions from the audience. Council incumbents including Kenyatta Johnson, W. Wilson Goode, and Blondell Reynolds Brown reminded the crowd that they had voted in favor of several successful LGBT-rights bills introduced over the last three years.
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NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Council and judicial candidates touted progressive ideas and support of the LGBT community Wednesday night in a forum held by Liberty City Democrats. More than 20 candidates for judge and Council addressed the crowd at the William Way LGBT Community Center in three-minute speeches, and later fielded questions from the audience. Council incumbents including Kenyatta Johnson, W. Wilson Goode, and Blondell Reynolds Brown reminded the crowd that they had voted in favor of several successful LGBT-rights bills introduced over the last three years.
NEWS
March 17, 2015 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Many of the courses she is taking at Rutgers-Camden law school are about the law as it currently is, says Katie Lara. "Sexuality, Gender, Identity and the Law" is different, she says: It is about how social movements change laws. The course that has Lara and fellow students excited is inspired by what its creator calls "the great civil rights struggle of our era" - for LGBT rights. Rutgers professor Katie Eyer said she began teaching the elective about a year ago after she was approached by students interested in the law as it pertains to sexuality.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
At an iconic Center City gay bar, mayoral candidate James F. Kenney greeted some of the leading LGBT advocates in the city, calling them his family and pledging to continue to protect their rights, in life and love, at a fund-raiser for his campaign. A drag queen manned the DJ station at Woody's, rainbow flags flew, and a slide show of Kenney through the years played on the TVs. Twenty years ago, such a campaign event likely would not have happened. Today, LGBT voters are seen as a key bloc of politically minded, progressive supporters who are expected to turn out - particularly this year, when two openly gay candidates are running for City Council.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
For former City Councilman James F. Kenney, Friday the 13th was anything but unlucky. The aspiring Philadelphia mayor received one of the biggest endorsements a candidate can land - from the Philadelphia Council, AFL-CIO - plus the backing of some of the city's LGBT leaders, representing a growing voter bloc, and the teachers' union. The AFL-CIO council is composed of more than 100 unions representing 130,000 workers in the public sector, private industry, and the building and construction trades.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rachel Levine stood tall in the doorway, offered a polite handshake, and took a seat at the L-shaped desk in her drab, blank slate of an office. The room, with its empty bookshelves, dual computer screens, and not much else, seemed appropriately open to possibility as the headquarters for a woman about to chart new territory. Levine, who has just been named Pennsylvania's physician general, spent most of her 57 years - at least outwardly - as a man. If the state Senate confirms her appointment, the doctor, who until a few years ago was known as Richard Levine, will become one of the nation's very few, openly transgender people in public office.
NEWS
November 1, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
  They've become some of Pennsylvania's biggest out-of-state political contributors: a small group of multimillionaires - most of them gay - who want every state to allow same-sex marriage and to pass laws protecting LGBT rights. Since the mid-2000s, they have poured more than $1 million in campaign contributions into the commonwealth through Democratic organizations, buoying campaigns here for governor, attorney general, and seats in the General Assembly. The biggest donors include Tim Gill, a Colorado software entrepreneur; David Bohnett, a California technology tycoon; and Jon Stryker, heir to a medical-device fortune who lives in Michigan.
NEWS
October 21, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloria Casarez, 42, the city's first director of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender affairs, died Sunday after a five-year battle with metastatic breast cancer. Even as her conditioned worsened, Ms. Casarez participated in a media event at City Hall two weeks ago to celebrate LGBT History Month. She died on her own terms at sunrise, said her wife, Tricia Dressel. Dressel was with her at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and they listened to Ms. Casarez's favorite music, U2, 10,000 Maniacs, and Bjork.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | BY JENELLE JANCI, Daily News Staff Writer jancij@phillynews.com, 215-568-5906
DAWN MUNRO wants to do everything she can to assure that transgender children won't have to experience the horror she did. "I told my parents around [age] 5, 6 that there was a problem," said Munro, who was born male. Her family consulted with doctors, and, at one point, Munro was sent to a mental institution, where she was given electroconvulsive therapy. Munro will be the recipient of this year's Jaci Adams OutProud Transgender Award, at Outfest 2014, on Sunday. In its 24th year, the event in Center City's Gayborhood will feature music, vendors, food, a flea market, dancing and more.
NEWS
October 3, 2014
I MAKE NO secret of the fact that I'm (an imperfect) Catholic. That makes for interesting conversations with strangers who know me only by what I've written, particularly former Catholics who still can't believe I go to Mass. So many of them wonder why I don't speak out against the horrible scourge of child abuse that became one of the preferred media obsessions over the past decade and a half. I understand why they ask, because to people whose only knowledge of the church was gleaned from the Baltimore Catechism back in the 1960s - before they abandoned the pews (and the Colts abandoned Baltimore)
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
FOLLOWING THE pummeling of a gay couple in Rittenhouse Square two weeks ago, City Council is stepping up its efforts to stop hate-fueled attacks on members of the LGBT community. Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown and Councilman Jim Kenney today will introduce a bill that they say will close a gaping loophole in the Philadelphia Code. The bill would add a new chapter to the city code, providing stricter penalties for hate crimes fueled by racism and bigotry and that target members of the LGBT community.
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