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Liberal Arts College

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NEWS
October 6, 1990 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
CAMPUS KUDOS Boola, boola! Six Philadelphia-area colleges and universities are among the nation's best, according to U.S. News & World Report's annual ratings. The magazine says Villanova is the best regional university in the north; Swarthmore is the second best national liberal-arts college; Rutgers-Camden is the fourth best regional university in the north; Rosemont is the fifth best northern liberal-arts college; Penn is the 13th best national university, and Haverford is the 21st best national liberal-arts college.
NEWS
May 2, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The president of Lafayette College in Easton will become Haverford College's 14th president, but he won't start the job for over a year, Haverford officials announced Tuesday. Dan Weiss, who has been president of Lafayette since 2005, was approved by Haverford's Board of Managers on Saturday, following a national search that began last fall. He starts at the 1,200-student liberal arts college in July 2013, which allows him to complete his eighth year of presidency at Lafayette, Haverford said.
NEWS
March 4, 2000
It's a global village, and for the proverbial 15 minutes this week, Beaver College in Glenside was the talk of the town. After The Inquirer's James M. O'Neill reported that the liberal arts college was thinking of changing its name, in part because of the ribald connotations it creates in sophomoric minds, the phone started ringing on campus. Newsweek on line 1! "All Things Considered" on line 2! Conan looking for late-night monologue material on 3! The BBC on hold! Morning disc jockeys all over the land drooling for an interview!
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | BY STEPHANIE MERRY, The Washington Post
IN HIS SECOND feature, the easygoing romantic dramedy "Liberal Arts," Josh Radnor plays Jesse, a 35-year-old New Yorker working in a college-admissions office who spends much of his spare time with his nose in a book. He is a bibliophile of the highest order. The concrete, steel and petty thieves of New York appear to overwhelm Jesse, so he jumps at the chance for a brief respite when a favorite college professor invites his former student to a retirement dinner. As soon as Jesse sets foot on the manicured grounds of the Ohio liberal-arts college he once attended, the rose-colored glasses firmly affix to his face.
SPORTS
December 10, 2000 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The athletic programs Swarthmore College eliminated last week might not even have existed if the school hadn't rejected an elderly woman's spectacular contribution 93 years ago. Anna Jeanes, a devout Philadelphia Quaker whose family had made a fortune investing in Pennsylvania's coal fields, died at 85 in 1907. The tiny spinster's will stipulated that much of her money go to African American schools and colleges in the South. Some was used to create Jeanes Hospital in Fox Chase, now part of Temple University's medical system.
NEWS
November 7, 1994 | By Laura J. Bruch, with reports from Inquirer wire services
THE COLLEGE OF THE FUTURE LOOKS A LOT LIKE HOME Hey, wait - the college of the future is home - or at least will be for many students. In the year 2050, they will simply plunk themselves down before their personal computers and start tapping away toward that undergraduate degree. Or so predicts Arthur Levine, president of Columbia University Teachers College in New York. During a recent interview with Reuters, he described a world in which students are lectured by some of the nation's top teachers and communicate with other students around the world - all on computer.
NEWS
October 24, 1992 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sister Carol Jean Vale, the former chairwoman of Chestnut Hill College's religious studies department, was inaugurated yesterday as the school's sixth president. Addressing a large gathering with representatives from an array of colleges and universities, Sister Vale stressed the important role that Catholic women's colleges such as Chestnut Hill serve in preparing tomorrow's leaders for the international arena. "Today the globalization of the human community is well within our grasp," she said.
NEWS
March 11, 2008 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marie Angelella George, an academic administrator with a specialty in strategic planning, was appointed president of Cabrini College yesterday, succeeding Antoinette Iadarola, who will retire in July. George, 58, who is originally from Wilkes-Barre, has served as executive vice president at St. Anselm College in Manchester, N.H., since 2003. She is second-in-command to the president, overseeing six vice presidents and the directors of the New Hampshire Institute of Politics and Campus Ministry.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For more than half of her 52 years, Sister Matthew Anita MacDonald has resided on Chestnut Hill College's leafy, 45-acre campus tucked away in the extreme northwestern corner of the city. She was still called Joanne MacDonald in 1956 when she arrived as a freshman at the Catholic college for women. After earning her bachelor's degree in English, she entered the Sisters of Saint Joseph of Chestnut Hill, the religious order that operates the college, and took the name Sister Matthew Anita.
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | by Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writer
Millie Malone, a switchboard operator at Holy Family College for 31 years, recalls when she wasn't permitted to wear slacks to work at the Torresdale school. "I used to wear a navy blue suit, hat and gloves," she said. "Holy Family was very formal in those days. " She went to work at Holy Family only eight years after its 1954 founding, when it had 17 full-time and 70 part-time students. Today, there are 1,000 full-time students and another 1,000 part-time. You can bet Malone will be dressed smartly when she reports for work June 25. It's her last day on the job. She'll retire a week before she turns 73 on July 2. "Holy Family is so much larger now," she said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | BY STEPHANIE MERRY, The Washington Post
IN HIS SECOND feature, the easygoing romantic dramedy "Liberal Arts," Josh Radnor plays Jesse, a 35-year-old New Yorker working in a college-admissions office who spends much of his spare time with his nose in a book. He is a bibliophile of the highest order. The concrete, steel and petty thieves of New York appear to overwhelm Jesse, so he jumps at the chance for a brief respite when a favorite college professor invites his former student to a retirement dinner. As soon as Jesse sets foot on the manicured grounds of the Ohio liberal-arts college he once attended, the rose-colored glasses firmly affix to his face.
NEWS
May 2, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The president of Lafayette College in Easton will become Haverford College's 14th president, but he won't start the job for over a year, Haverford officials announced Tuesday. Dan Weiss, who has been president of Lafayette since 2005, was approved by Haverford's Board of Managers on Saturday, following a national search that began last fall. He starts at the 1,200-student liberal arts college in July 2013, which allows him to complete his eighth year of presidency at Lafayette, Haverford said.
NEWS
April 18, 2012 | By Peyton R. Helm
Those urging Democrats and Republicans to reach consensus more often should be careful what they wish for. The higher-education policies of the Bush and Obama administrations, for example, have had much in common: They have been equally simpleminded, equally unhelpful, and equally intrusive. Margaret Spellings, George W. Bush's education secretary, sought to require every college and university in the country to create massive databases that would allow the federal government to track all students' academic whereabouts and performance.
NEWS
September 23, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
BACK IN January 2009, John Strassburger found himself seated next to a college freshman on a train ride to Philadelphia - and having to bite his tongue. The freshman was talking proudly about how he was majoring in finance and real estate. "I was far too polite to say what I really thought," said Strassburger, then president of Ursinus College. Writing about the experience in the Inquirer, Strassburger said, "I cannot help but think that, while conventional wisdom might hold that we need students thinking about careers for the good of the economy, our country really needs students thinking about big ideas.
NEWS
November 2, 2009 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The University of Pennsylvania's Amy Gutmann again was among the highest-compensated private college presidents in the country, according to the Chronicle of Higher Education's annual salary survey, released today. The Ivy League president, who has led Penn since 2004, earned $1.22 million in 2007-08, the most recent year available - $825,000 in salary and the rest in benefits. She was the eighth-highest-paid president of a private research university, down from sixth place a year earlier, the Chronicle reported.
NEWS
March 11, 2008 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marie Angelella George, an academic administrator with a specialty in strategic planning, was appointed president of Cabrini College yesterday, succeeding Antoinette Iadarola, who will retire in July. George, 58, who is originally from Wilkes-Barre, has served as executive vice president at St. Anselm College in Manchester, N.H., since 2003. She is second-in-command to the president, overseeing six vice presidents and the directors of the New Hampshire Institute of Politics and Campus Ministry.
NEWS
February 9, 2008 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An internationally known scholar of Islamic studies whose expertise is in the Quran and relations between Islam and Christianity was selected as the eighth president of Bryn Mawr College yesterday. The appointment of Jane Dammen McAuliffe was announced to the college community by pealing bells from Taylor Hall. McAuliffe, dean of the college of arts and sciences at Georgetown University, said she planned to emphasize the natural sciences and multiculturalism when she takes over from Nancy J. Vickers on July 1. She wants to beef up science offerings and actively recruit international students to the 123-year-old liberal-arts campus.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2006 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
Artists can be first-rate curators when the opportunity arises. But I doubt many artists would be ready, willing and able to tackle the kind of historical exhibition that painter Robert Godfrey has assembled for the Bridgette Mayer Gallery. "Greetings From Black Mountain College" is a labor of love. Godfrey, whose paintings are represented by Mayer, did not himself attend Black Mountain College, the legendary liberal-arts college that opened its doors in 1933 and closed them in 1956.
SPORTS
December 10, 2000 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The athletic programs Swarthmore College eliminated last week might not even have existed if the school hadn't rejected an elderly woman's spectacular contribution 93 years ago. Anna Jeanes, a devout Philadelphia Quaker whose family had made a fortune investing in Pennsylvania's coal fields, died at 85 in 1907. The tiny spinster's will stipulated that much of her money go to African American schools and colleges in the South. Some was used to create Jeanes Hospital in Fox Chase, now part of Temple University's medical system.
NEWS
March 4, 2000
It's a global village, and for the proverbial 15 minutes this week, Beaver College in Glenside was the talk of the town. After The Inquirer's James M. O'Neill reported that the liberal arts college was thinking of changing its name, in part because of the ribald connotations it creates in sophomoric minds, the phone started ringing on campus. Newsweek on line 1! "All Things Considered" on line 2! Conan looking for late-night monologue material on 3! The BBC on hold! Morning disc jockeys all over the land drooling for an interview!
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