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NEWS
February 17, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lena Thomas, 91, of Eastwick, a Pentecostal bishop who founded four churches in Philadelphia and several in Liberia, died Monday of complications of pneumonia at Taylor Hospital. Born the third eldest of 10 children, she moved with her family in 1923 to South Philadelphia from Casey, S.C. Times were tough, and the young woman dropped out of Overbrook High School when she was 15 to work in a factory to help put food on the table. That same year, she married Julius Thomas, a carpenter, and they raised six children in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 6, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
More than 200 Marines at the U.S. Embassy in Liberia are defending a "skeleton size" diplomatic staff and awaiting any more citizens who request evacuation from the West African nation's bloody civil war. "The Marines are there to protect lives. They are authorized to use whatever means are necessary and they are there in a battle situation," White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said yesterday. In a helicopter rescue, about 225 Marines plucked 59 Americans from the embassy grounds and airlifted them to safety aboard U.S. warships off the coast, the Pentagon said.
NEWS
November 11, 2011 | By Jonathan Paye-Layleh and Rukmini Callimachi, Associated Press
MONROVIA, Liberia - Africa's first and only female president handily won reelection Thursday with 90.2 percent of the vote, but her victory has been rendered hollow and her government may struggle to prove its legitimacy because the opposition boycotted the poll. Hours before the results were announced in an election that was supposed to solidify Liberia's shaky peace, opposition leader Winston Tubman said he would not accept the outcome of this week's presidential runoff. With nearly nine-tenths of precincts reporting, National Election Commission chair Elizabeth Nelson announced late Thursday that Sirleaf had received 513,320 votes out of 565,391 tallied.
NEWS
May 21, 2013
By Melissa Chea-Annan Chilling remarks about press freedom in Liberia have led to a standoff between the government and the media. At a ceremony on May 3 marking World Press Freedom Day, Othello Daniel Warrick, the chief security aide to President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, referred to journalists as "terrorists. " The threatening remarks by Warrick, the head of Liberia's presidential guard, the Executive Protection Service (EPS), also included a vow to arrest journalists if they continue to report negative stories on the president and her administration.
NEWS
October 16, 1995 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Fighting started yesterday around the central headquarters of rebel leader Charles Taylor, forcing civilians to flee and further eroding a peace accord. Taylor, now vice chairman in a transitional government that was inaugurated Sept. 1, blamed fighters of a rival rebel faction whose leader also sits on the new government. He said news of fresh clashes came from commanders in his regional base in the central town of Gbarnga. They said fighting started when the small town of Suakoko, just south of Gbarnga, was attacked by the ULIMO militia of Alhaji Kromah.
NEWS
December 17, 2004 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some police officers in Liberia could soon be patrolling in used Philadelphia police uniforms, thanks to a partnership between Police Commissioner Sylvester M. Johnson and the chief of Liberia's national police, Col. Christian Massoaquoi. Massoaquoi, 50, has been visiting with various police executives this month during a visit to the United States, and he attended the recent International Association of Chiefs Of Police convention in California. A 23-year police veteran, Massoaquoi spent some time here and accompanied Highway Patrol officers as they worked the city.
NEWS
March 10, 2006 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Talk about a career change. Beatrice Munah Sieh is making the leap from schoolteacher in Trenton to central figure in the rebuilding of a war-torn African nation. Today is Munah Sieh's last day at Grace A. Dunn Middle School, where she has taught special education for six years. In a few weeks, she will start her new job - as Liberia's first female chief of police. Huh? "It was shocking," said Jermaine Kamau, a vice principal at Dunn. It's not as crazy as it sounds.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | By Laura Weiss and Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writers
Trish Henwood wasn't sleeping well. "I'm not somebody who suffers from insomnia - ever," she says. But she was feeling guilt, feeling the call. She had to go to Liberia, to confront the Ebola epidemic. But how could she? Henwood, 34, had just taken a new job in July as an emergency-room physician at the University of Pennsylvania and as director of global health initiatives. She is among a pioneering wave of ER physicians who have learned that the humble little ultrasound machine is a "game-changer" in remote countries.
NEWS
December 5, 2000 | By Brian Miller, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Upper Darby's Oliver Quiah brought a great soccer game to America, his new home. And considering what he's been through, what the immigrant from Liberia accomplished this year was one of the great stories in area boys' soccer. And he is The Inquirer's Main Line and Delaware County area boys' soccer player of the year. Quiah was obviously the player every team the Royals faced wanted to stop this season. A natural goal-scorer with a huge foot who could find the net from almost anywhere, Quiah blasted home 27 goals, the most in Delaware County this season and believed to be a school record, according to Upper Darby coach Tom Farr.
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Wegoye, an emergency-room nurse at Inspira Medical Center Woodbury, will leave Thursday for at least four months in Liberia helping fight the Ebola epidemic. Wegoye, 33, who lives in Haddon Township, said he had been following the crisis, and when the World Health Organization declared it a disaster, he felt he had to step forward. "When I noticed it was not being contained, but just kept spiraling, I started searching for ways to actually help. " "The risks I totally understand," Wegoye added.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
During 14 years of civil war in Liberia, more than 700,000 residents fled the country. One of the nation's most popular singers, Tokay Tomah, went in the opposite direction. Through the '90s, she waded into the smoldering remains of the war alongside U.N. workers, visiting combatant camps to sing for peace. It was terrifying work: Soldiers were high on cocaine and other drugs, and it seemed anything could happen at any time. Still, she saw it as the most direct path to reconciliation.
NEWS
October 11, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
ADENAH BAYOH has a mind for business. As the first black woman in New Jersey to open an IHOP franchise, she now owns three restaurants in the flapjack chain. She co-founded a real estate firm that's building a $150 million residential and retail development in the Garden State. And she was identified as one of the Top 50 women in business by NJBIZ, a weekly journal. But the 37-year-old North Jersey entrepreneur's pursuits aren't limited to the business world. She is also encouraging young women to pursue their dreams by establishing a scholarship.
NEWS
August 2, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every morning, first thing, Mary Moore Kieh searches Craigslist for old EKG and X-ray machines. Maybe one day she'll get lucky and find an operating room light. Kieh, 49, a nurse at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital in Darby, is building a clinic in her native Liberia. She knows she cannot save the world. But she may save some people who come to her clinic. And maybe they can help others. And perhaps just by trying, she will inspire others to make more of their own lives, to have hope, even a dream.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trish Henwood, the University of Pennsylvania emergency-room physician who twice went to Liberia to fight Ebola, says global intervention - albeit too late - still saved hundreds of thousands of lives. She also says the frantic reaction here showed U.S. leaders that improving health systems in fragile African nations is in our national security interest. Henwood, who gave Penn's annual Global Distinguished Lecture on Tuesday evening, told a rapt audience that fear too often trumped science and "definitely hampered the response . . . and led to more panic than preparedness.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2015 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
When Denny Ballough was 16 years old, he came to his parents, Gerald and Daryl, with an unusual request. His longtime buddy, a 17-year-old Liberian refugee named John Sneh, didn't have any place to call home. Could he come live with us? On this recent evening, the Balloughs have gathered in their Drexel Hill home to talk about the momentous decision they made 6½ years ago in the hopes of inspiring others. "I was probably the most hesitant," says Daryl, 54. "In your heart, you knew it was the right thing to do. It was just the logistics of it, the reality of it. . . . That's a little scary.
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Wegoye, an emergency-room nurse at Inspira Medical Center Woodbury, will leave Thursday for at least four months in Liberia helping fight the Ebola epidemic. Wegoye, 33, who lives in Haddon Township, said he had been following the crisis, and when the World Health Organization declared it a disaster, he felt he had to step forward. "When I noticed it was not being contained, but just kept spiraling, I started searching for ways to actually help. " "The risks I totally understand," Wegoye added.
NEWS
October 25, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Working without surgical gloves, a nurse contracts Ebola. Her distraught husband wants to comfort her but she runs screaming - "Don't touch me!" - across their yard. "What have I done to deserve this?" she wails. Wanting a hands-on ritual burial for a nephew who died, a village elder steals back the body from townsmen preparing to bury it safely. A pastor unschooled in Ebola throws an arm around a tear-streaked parishioner and says she'll be OK. "Do you believe in Ebola or in Jesus Christ?"
NEWS
October 23, 2014
A story Wednesday about area colleges' efforts to plan in the Ebola pandemic gave incorrect information about Drexel University's efforts to prepare for Ebola. The university has suspended travels and program development only in the three countries currently under CDC warning for Ebola - Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. The incorrect information was provided by the university.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
All passengers arriving in the United States from Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea will now be required to fly into one of the five airports that have enhanced screening for the deadly Ebola virus, the Department of Homeland Security said Tuesday. The additional travel restrictions, designed to prevent the spread of Ebola, mean that travelers from the three West African countries hardest hit by the disease, if not flying into one of the five U.S. airports with increased screening, will have to rebook their flights.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Ebola concerns mount, many campuses across the region are suspending university-sponsored travel to affected countries, training health center employees to deal with an outbreak, and monitoring the health of students arriving from regions hit by the illness. "Even if the probability of an Ebola outbreak in this country remains remote, it is critically important that we take proactive measures to be fully prepared," Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania, wrote in an e-mail to the Penn community last week, outlining steps the Philadelphia university is taking.
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