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NEWS
April 4, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
PHILADELPHIA'S Libertarian Party this week selected a marijuana-legalization activist on federal probation as its candidate in the May 20 special election for an at-large City Council seat. The party filed a nomination certificate for Richard Tamaccio yesterday, according to the Philadelphia Board of Elections. Tamaccio, a comedian who uses the stage name n.a. Poe, also filed a ballot name-change affidavit seeking to list himself on the ballot as Nikki Allen Poe. Tamaccio, 34, who this week registered to vote as a Libertarian, said in an email that he "will be attacking the Local 98 machine and running a grass-roots peoples campaign.
NEWS
September 19, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Libertarian flaws Political columnist John Baer should have provided a more complete picture of Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson ("Johnson worth a a look," Wednesday). For instance, Johnson wants to slash Medicare and Medicaid programs by 43 percent and raise the retirement age to at least 70. He opposes any sensible gun control. In an interview with the Washington Post, he didn't know what the nuclear triad is (submarine-launched ballistic missiles, intercontinental ballistic missiles, and heavy bombers)
NEWS
October 1, 1997 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For months, the underdog Republican in the Philadelphia district attorney's race has been trying to get incumbent Lynne Abraham to agree to a debate. He has finally succeeded. The two candidates, along with Libertarian Party standard-bearer Leon Aristotle Williams, will meet for a one-hour debate Oct. 20 in the Sixth Street studios of public television station WHYY (Channel 12). The debate will be sponsored by the League of Women Voters, the Philadelphia chapter of the NAACP, and the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce.
NEWS
September 10, 2016 | By Philip Bump, WASHINGTON POST
It would be easy to describe Gary Johnson's appearance on MSNBC's Morning Joe on Thursday as having doomed his third-party candidacy for president were it not for the fact that his candidacy was already doomed. The English language lacks a good way to describe something that was already in very bad shape and then, somehow, becomes far worse rather dramatically. Like if the Titanic had begun sinking but then blew up. Johnson was talking politics with the Morning Joe crew when regular guest Mike Barnicle shifted gears.
NEWS
October 13, 1999
An editorial yesterday endorsing the reelection of the First District City Council incumbent, Democrat Frank DiCicco, failed to note two other challengers on the ballot: Steven N. Kush of the Libertarian Party and Reform Party candidate Anthony Archevala.
NEWS
August 19, 2012 | Associated Press
HARRISBURG - The state Republican Party is challenging candidate petitions by members of the Constitution and Libertarian Parties, seeking to bounce from the state ballot candidates for president, vice president, and several other offices. Line-by-line reviews of the candidates' petition signatures ordered by a state Commonwealth Court judge will begin Monday at the Philadelphia Board of Elections. Analysts say Republicans are probably worried that conservatives dissatisfied with their presidential candidate, Mitt Romney, will defect to Constitution or Libertarian candidates.
NEWS
July 27, 1996 | By Brigid Schulte, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For any other politician, it would have been an unusual campaign stop: Twenty-somethings in cutoff jeans, bandanas, bikinis and tattoos sat on the grass across from the White House, singing loudly: "Marijuana. Marijuana. Hey, Hey. Get hiiiigh. " Suspicious-smelling smoke hung in the hot afternoon air. Libertarian Party presidential hopeful Harry Browne stepped up to the microphone, looking every inch a stodgy conservative. Blue suit with matching socks. Gold watch. Coiffed silver-white hair.
NEWS
September 13, 1987 | By S.A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ron Paul, born in Pittsburgh in 1935, once a flight surgeon in the Air Force and a former member of Congress from Texas, has given up on the Republican Party and its most recent contribution to the presidency - Ronald Reagan - and decided to run for the White House himself. But voters looking for Paul will not find him elbow-to-elbow with the presidential aspirants of the two major political parties. He does need money, and sure, he would take a few photo opportunities. But Paul does not want delegates.
NEWS
December 13, 2004
Non-taxpaying Libertarian has right to protest Bob Martin's Dec. 2 commentary, "Movement evades income tax - and honesty" condemns the entire Libertarian Party because Arthur Farnsworth, our treasurer, is having a payment dispute with the federal government. Martin suggests that the Libertarian Party should either inform the public they are obligated to pay federal income taxes - as if we are some governmental agency - or acknowledge that we are the political arm of the tax-honesty movement.
NEWS
August 30, 1989 | By Joseph Grace, Daily News Staff Writer
At first glance, Linda Morrison, a Queen Village liberal, and Steven Givot, a conservative Chicago intellectual, seem to have little in common. Morrison, 40, came of age in the '60s protesting the Vietnam War and supporting women's rights. "I was a liberal Democrat," she says. She's spent much of the '80s opposing the Center City Convention Center project as a waste of tax dollars. Givot, 39, is a businessman who ran unsuccessfully for a U.S. Senate seat in Illinois in 1984 with heavy support from national conservative politicians.
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NEWS
September 19, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Libertarian flaws Political columnist John Baer should have provided a more complete picture of Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson ("Johnson worth a a look," Wednesday). For instance, Johnson wants to slash Medicare and Medicaid programs by 43 percent and raise the retirement age to at least 70. He opposes any sensible gun control. In an interview with the Washington Post, he didn't know what the nuclear triad is (submarine-launched ballistic missiles, intercontinental ballistic missiles, and heavy bombers)
NEWS
September 10, 2016 | By Philip Bump, WASHINGTON POST
It would be easy to describe Gary Johnson's appearance on MSNBC's Morning Joe on Thursday as having doomed his third-party candidacy for president were it not for the fact that his candidacy was already doomed. The English language lacks a good way to describe something that was already in very bad shape and then, somehow, becomes far worse rather dramatically. Like if the Titanic had begun sinking but then blew up. Johnson was talking politics with the Morning Joe crew when regular guest Mike Barnicle shifted gears.
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Staff Writer
A marijuana-legalization activist has dropped his bid to be the Libertarian Party's candidate for Pennsylvania attorney general. N.A. Poe, who is also a comedian, filed the paperwork Monday afternoon and then exited stage left with his sense of humor still on full display. Poe said his exit - "at high noon" - came after the state's Republican and Democratic Parties filed legal challenges last week, noting that a law license is necessary for the job. "It's obvious that I'm not qualified for attorney general," Poe declared.
NEWS
August 11, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Staff Writer
For N.A. Poe, a marijuana-legalization activist from Philadelphia, running for state attorney general was a lark to draw attention to the issue. The state Republican and Democratic Parties didn't find it funny. Both parties filed legal challenges Monday seeking to remove Poe - a stage name for the activism work and comedian act of Richard Tamaccio - from the Nov. 8 general election ballot as the Libertarian Party candidate. Poe on Tuesday said he was examining his options, one of which was to "bow out gracefully.
NEWS
August 9, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Give third parties some coverage Why does the Inquirer continue to pretend there are only two parties running candidates for president ("Pa. ballot will include five parties," Wednesday)? Your coverage has made it clear that the majority of potential voters don't want either one. The Libertarian Party has its strongest ticket ever with former Govs. Gary Johnson of New Mexico and William Weld of Massachusetts. There will be numerous other choices on Pennsylvania's ballot and candidates who can be written in. The missing ingredient for informed choices in November is sufficient media coverage.
NEWS
June 7, 2016
ISSUE | HOMELESSNESS Montco making gains In Montgomery County, we realize that ending homelessness is a community effort (" Will reaching out be enough? " May 26). In 2014, we launched Your Way Home Montgomery County, a partnership of government, philanthropy, nonprofits, and community to end homelessness and housing instability for hardworking families and vulnerable residents. In its first two years, YWH increased exits from shelter to permanent housing fromĀ 30 percent to 46 percent, and more thanĀ 94 percent of the rehoused people have maintained housing stability.
NEWS
June 3, 2016
By Antony Davies and James R. Harrigan Is it time for a third party? This question is asked every four years, but it is moot. A third-party candidate representing the Libertarian Party will be on the ballot in all 50 states. There will also be a Green Party candidate on the ballot in many but not all states. So that's four parties. The real question is whether there is a hill of beans' worth of difference between the two major parties. Maybe what we really need is a viable second party, because from any objective point of view, the Republicans and the Democrats care about only one thing: the acquisition of power.
NEWS
June 2, 2016
By Jennifer Rubin On Sunday, Gary Johnson, the former New Mexico governor, won the Libertarian Party nomination for president, with former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld as his running mate. Johnson is an impassioned proponent of the party's small-government message, and he told the crowd he thinks most people are Libertarians but don't know it. At a news conference, he made a play for tea-party voters, saying what started out as a fiscal, small-government movement was captured by Republicans, especially social conservatives.
NEWS
July 26, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge has ruled that Pennsylvania unfairly treats its third-party political candidates, likely clearing the way for their return to the ballot after nearly disappearing during recent election cycles. In an opinion released Friday, U.S. District Judge Lawrence Stengel wrote that the ability of minor parties to organize and speak out "has been decimated" by portions of the state's election code. Specifically, Stengel took issue with a rule that has forced third-party candidates to gather many times the number of signatures required of Republicans or Democrats - and then pay as much as $100,000 in legal fees when their petitions are challenged.
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