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Liberty Bell Park

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NEWS
May 13, 1986 | By Gregory R. Byrnes, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Washington development firm yesterday signed an agreement to purchase Liberty Bell Park in Northeast Philadelphia for $23.3 million and said it planned to develop a large enclosed shopping mall on the 288-acre property. In addition to building a $100 million mall that would be slightly bigger than the nearby Oxford Valley Mall in Langhorne, Western Development Corp. said it was considering plans to construct a hotel conference center, offices for professional and medical use and residences on the former harness racing track.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1986 | By GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
The owner of Liberty Bell Park yesterday agreed to sell the racetrack for $23.3 million to a Washington, D.C., development company that has tentative plans to build a shopping center on the Northeast Philadelphia site. Liberty Bell Park Inc., the track's corporate owner, plans to sell the 288- acre property to Western Development Corp., which has preliminary plans to build a large commercial development at the track, located at Knights and Woodhaven roads. A 1-million-square-foot shopping mall, specializing in discount stores, would anchor the project.
SPORTS
September 13, 2008 | INQUIRER STAFF REPORT
Craig Donnelly, who has been handicapping thoroughbred races in The Inquirer since 1971, when he was a senior at Radnor High School, has retired from the newspaper and will no longer be making selections. Over the years, Donnelly has picked the races at Garden State Park, Philadelphia Park, Atlantic City, Meadowlands, Liberty Bell Park, and Keystone. He once picked all eight races correctly at Delaware, and the most impressive horses he saw run in person were Spectacular Bid in 1979 and Afleet Alex in 2005.
NEWS
January 6, 1992 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Joseph "Junior" Murphy, 81, a former Philadelphia firefighter and well-loved member of the Port Richmond neighborhood, died Thursday at Northeastern Hospital. Mr. Murphy was a native of Philadelphia, attended St. Anne's School and played basketball in the Philadelphia Catholic League. Mr. Murphy was a member of the Philadelphia Fire Department from 1936 to 1961. After retiring from the department, he worked as fire chief for the Liberty Bell Park until 1979. Mr. Murphy was a strong and sturdy man who stood 6 feet, 6 inches tall and always walked to church, said his daughter-in-law Judith Murphy.
NEWS
March 3, 1996 | By Thomas Turcol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Louis Stein, 90, a former president of Food Fair Stores, died Friday at Mount Sinai Hospital in Miami Beach from complications of a stroke he suffered last year. Mr. Stein was born Jan. 29, 1906, in Union City, N.J. After graduating from Fordham Law School in 1926, he practiced law in New Jersey from 1926 to 1953. He moved to Philadelphia in 1953 when he became president of Food Fair Stores. He retired in 1971 and split his time between Philadelphia and Miami Beach, where he became active in community affairs.
NEWS
September 24, 1987 | By FRANK DOUGHERTY, Daily News Staff Writer
James "Daddy Jimmy" Wallace, a North Philadelphia businessman who operated Jimmy's Corner at 21st and Oxford streets for the past 45 years, died Sunday. He was 81 and lived in North Philadelphia. "Jimmy's Corner in many respects was - and remains - an old-fashioned general store, a place where you can still pick up all those little needed items," said Linda Jasper, a niece who worked off and on for 21 years at the corner store. "Daddy Jimmy - he was my godfather as well as my uncle - first put me on the payroll at the age of eight.
SPORTS
July 15, 2005 | By Craig Donnelly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rick Wilson is among the most dominating jockeys in the history of racing in the Philadelphia area, boasting nine riding titles and some 75 stakes victories at Philadelphia Park alone. But Wilson, 51, has not ridden since May 8, 2004, when his mount at Pimlico stumbled after the start and kicked the fallen rider in the head, resulting in a heavy loss of blood and multiple skull fractures. A race will be named in his honor at Philadelphia Park tomorrow and many friends and fans will be able to greet the rider who was known for his aggressive riding style and tremendous desire to win. Wilson and his wife, Jean, will travel from their home in Sykesville, Md., to Philadelphia Park along with three of their four children.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | By Robert W. Fowler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brandywine Raceway, a homey jewel of a racetrack in northern Delaware, will close because of increasing financial losses, officials announced yesterday. The closing means the loss of up to 1,800 permanent, seasonal and contract jobs associated with the operation of the harness racing track, according to track president Denis McGlynn. Brandywine Raceway was built for $2 million and opened in 1953 on 188 acres, six miles north of downtown Wilmington. While the area around the track has grown enormously with homes and businesses, so have other places for people to gamble.
SPORTS
July 13, 1994 | By Craig Donnelly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Jenkins, vice president of racing and the racing secretary at Philadelphia Park, resigned yesterday after 10 years of coordinating the live racing programs at the Bensalem track. The 51-year-old official said his resignation was sparked by continuing frustration with the declining quality of racing at Philadelphia Park, which many prominent horsemen have left to seek better purses and conditions elsewhere. "You've got to have quality trainers to run a good meet," Jenkins said yesterday.
SPORTS
February 6, 1987 | By Don Clippinger, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brandywine Raceway, the northern Delaware harness track that was in danger of closing late last year, will hold races through the 1987 season. Track officials have announced that the Delaware Harness Racing Commission has granted 138 racing dates to Brandywine, a 5/8-mile track just across the Pennsylvania border from Delaware County. The dates were approved at a meeting Wednesday night in Dover, Del. The track will open its 35th racing season on March 29 and end its schedule on Sept.
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NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tony Black is looking for one more win in the saddle before calling it quits. With 5,199 first-place finishes in the books, the jockey, at age 61, believes it's time to get out of the bone-crushing part of the thoroughbred racing business. Recovering from surgery to put a plate in a twice-broken collar bone, the longtime Haddon Township resident is waiting for medical clearance before racing again. "It's a kid's game, being a jockey," Black said. "I've ridden the wave long enough.
SPORTS
September 13, 2008 | INQUIRER STAFF REPORT
Craig Donnelly, who has been handicapping thoroughbred races in The Inquirer since 1971, when he was a senior at Radnor High School, has retired from the newspaper and will no longer be making selections. Over the years, Donnelly has picked the races at Garden State Park, Philadelphia Park, Atlantic City, Meadowlands, Liberty Bell Park, and Keystone. He once picked all eight races correctly at Delaware, and the most impressive horses he saw run in person were Spectacular Bid in 1979 and Afleet Alex in 2005.
SPORTS
April 13, 2007 | By Craig Donnelly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Great Hunter enters the starting gate for tomorrow's Blue Grass Stakes, don't blame Phil Fanning if he ducks out of a wedding that afternoon to view the race. "It's like waiting to see what one of my children is doing," said Fanning, the Chester County breeder of the Kentucky Derby hopeful. Fanning, 83, was born in Philadelphia and raised in West Orange, N.J., where his lifelong love of horses began. He lives now in Unionville. "They'd deliver milk on wagons drawn by horses, and I'd go out to see them all the time as a child," he said.
SPORTS
July 1, 2006 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 1,000-foot-long structure along the Delaware River is already assuming some of its future glitz. With concrete and steel underpinning the captain's bridge dining room, the expansive atrium and cavernous slots parlor, Harrah's Chester Casino & Racetrack will be as sturdy as it is massive. It had better be. The $430 million facility, whose 5/8-mile harness track is set to open in a little more than two months - on Sept. 10 - is being asked to hoist a couple of sizable ambitions on its young shoulders.
SPORTS
May 2, 2006 | By Craig Donnelly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jockey Tony Black earned his 5,000th career victory aboard Actcentric in the fifth race at Philadelphia Park yesterday in a scene reminiscent of why he is such a big part of the region's thoroughbred racing history. From the start, the former champion high school wrestler coaxed his mount to the lead, setting what appeared to be a suicidally quick pace, only to settle his mount, awaiting challenges soon to come. Approaching the stretch, the horse appeared to be tiring as a pair of stretch-runners prepared to pounce.
SPORTS
July 15, 2005 | By Craig Donnelly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rick Wilson is among the most dominating jockeys in the history of racing in the Philadelphia area, boasting nine riding titles and some 75 stakes victories at Philadelphia Park alone. But Wilson, 51, has not ridden since May 8, 2004, when his mount at Pimlico stumbled after the start and kicked the fallen rider in the head, resulting in a heavy loss of blood and multiple skull fractures. A race will be named in his honor at Philadelphia Park tomorrow and many friends and fans will be able to greet the rider who was known for his aggressive riding style and tremendous desire to win. Wilson and his wife, Jean, will travel from their home in Sykesville, Md., to Philadelphia Park along with three of their four children.
SPORTS
March 7, 2005 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Their horse is taking dead aim at the Kentucky Derby - he's already one of the favorites - but for the owners of Afleet Alex, all Philadelphians through and through, it's been a crazy ride already. Their horse, based at Delaware Park, has won a stakes race at Saratoga and finished second at the Breeders' Cup, and the top jockey in the nation has signed on to ride Afleet Alex this year. On Saturday, Afleet Alex put in an unexpected appearance at Oaklawn Park in Hot Springs, Ark., and held off Razor to win the 66th running of the Mountain Valley Stakes.
NEWS
August 13, 2004 | By Jeff Hurvitz
Jeff Hurvitz lives and writes in Abington Township I think the bill bringing slot machines to Pennsylvania is a good thing. There is at least the chance that gambling will seed other opportunities for commerce in this state. The bill itself is a gamble, and, despite the odds, the downsides of gambling, and the stakes at hand - which includes the future of Philadelphia - I think it's a chance we should take. The bill, approved July 2, allows for the placement of up to 61,000 slot machines into 14 venues throughout the state.
SPORTS
April 30, 2004 | By Craig Donnelly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Bombay Duck and his Philadelphia-based entourage headed to the 101st Kentucky Derby in 1975, they did so with excitement and confidence. But they could not anticipate that they would change Derby history in both official and unofficial ways. Officially, Bombay Duck raced the fastest three quarters of a mile in the history of the world's biggest horse race. Unofficially, he became the first entrant ever to be struck by a beer can, prompting officials to limit the access of infield fans to the horses the next year.
SPORTS
July 14, 1999 | By Craig Donnelly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jockey Tony Black, who has dominated Philadelphia-area tracks for nearly three decades, rode his 4,000 winner yesterday, becoming only the 33d rider in the history of North American racing to achieve that milestone - and he did so aboard a lightly regarded horse in familiar fashion. The victory in the ninth race at Philadelphia Park on Sand And Water ($34.80), "typifies the Tony Black style," the elated Black said during winners' circle ceremonies. "Get to the front and have something left.
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