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Liberty Bell Pavilion

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NEWS
September 29, 2004 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
A small, little-known Bryn Mawr business college has agreed to move Philadelphia's bicentennial-era Liberty Bell Pavilion to its campus, sparing the swooping glass-and-steel masterpiece from demolition, officials from Independence National Historical Park said yesterday. The American College, which trains professionals in the insurance and financial-services industries, plans to install the pavilion on a scenic bluff on its 35-acre campus, said president Larry Barton. The transparent structure, which was designed in 1976 by architect Romaldo Giurgola as a pristine jewel case for the Liberty Bell, will become the entrance for an underground conference center and museum.
NEWS
May 7, 1998 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two noted architectural firms, one from Boston and one from Philadelphia, yesterday were chosen from six competing teams to design the Gateway Visitor Center, meant to be the anchor for tourism throughout Southeastern Pennsylvania. Kallmann, McKinnell & Wood, which designed Boston City Hall in 1963, and MGA Partners, of Philadelphia, which designed the current Liberty Bell Pavilion, were chosen by the nonprofit corporation that is building the Gateway Center. MGA was formerly known as Mitchell/Giurgola Associates.
NEWS
September 23, 2003 | By David B. Brawer
Recently I took a tour of the new Liberty Bell Pavilion. As I walked through Philadelphia's newest monument I couldn't help but cast a sad, wistful glance to the old pavilion. This small building, much loved by architects and much hated, it seems, by just about everyone else, likely will be demolished when the bell takes up residence in its new home on Oct. 9. After 27 years this jewel of modern architecture may soon be just a memory. For an architect who completed his education at the University of Pennsylvania at the moment of its creation, this is a poignant, yet revealing, milestone.
NEWS
January 29, 2000 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A year ago, when the Republicans chose Philadelphia for their convention city, all things seemed possible. Former Mayor Ed Rendell predicted that by the convention's start on July 31 a tram would cross the Delaware River; the Liberty Bell would have a proud palace on Independence Mall; and Mickey Mouse would preside over a new family entertainment center, DisneyQuest, on Market Street. But none of that will be ready for Republicans. The DisneyQuest project is struggling for funding, the tram won't happen for at least a year, and construction on the Liberty Bell Pavilion won't start until the convention ends.
NEWS
January 26, 1999 | MICHAEL MALLY / Inquirer Staff Photographer
From the shelter of the Liberty Bell pavilion, two tourists from Boston plan their itinerary during a drizzly day in Philadelphia. Today should be better for sightseeing, with more sunshine and cooler temperatures.
NEWS
November 20, 1995 | Inquirer photographs by Tom Gralish
Visitors to Independence Mall at Fourth and Chestnut Streets found yesterday that they weren't exactly at liberty to view history as they had intended. A sign posted on the Liberty Bell pavilion said: "Closed due to lack of appropriations. " It was the sixth day of a tense budget standoff between the Republican-controlled Congress and the Clinton administration. Last night both sides declared victory as a compromise was announced that would send nearly 800,000 federal workers back to their jobs and satisfy hordes of tourists.
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NEWS
May 21, 2010 | By Allison Steele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A section of Independence Mall was evacuated for more than three hours Thursday after a security guard found a deflated balloon filled with white powder near the entrance to the Liberty Bell. Preliminary tests have determined the powder was not explosive or radiological, and there was no indication that it was hazardous, FBI Special Agent J.J. Klaver said. The substance was some type of organic compound, Klaver said, but authorities will not know for sure what it is until more thorough tests have been conducted.
NEWS
May 9, 2010 | By Nathan Gorenstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How much liberty are you entitled to on the sidewalk that leads to the Liberty Bell? Defining freedom has turned out to be no simple thing at what might be considered the metaphysical ground zero of America. The National Park Service, the American Civil Liberties Union, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, antiabortion demonstrators, and animal-rights activists have been crossing pens over who can do what in and around the narrow entrance to the Liberty Bell Pavilion.
NEWS
May 9, 2010 | By Nathan Gorenstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
How much liberty are you entitled to on the sidewalk that leads to the Liberty Bell? Defining freedom has turned out to be no simple thing at what might be considered the metaphysical ground zero of America. The National Park Service, the American Civil Liberties Union, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, antiabortion demonstrators, and animal-rights activists have been crossing pens over who can do what in and around the narrow entrance to the Liberty Bell Pavilion.
NEWS
June 11, 2009 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Early in its storied past, the Liberty Bell became a proud symbol of resistance against the British monarchy. These days, the big hunk of bronze has to contend with more prosaic enemies: airborne pollution and grubby tourist fingers. So it was that museum tech Jonathan Miller was charged with applying a protective coat of wax to the massive bell's insides last night, working with a cotton cloth and a pair of white gloves after the crowds had gone home. "It's great," said Miller, 43, of Upper Darby.
NEWS
July 3, 2007
HERE WE ARE, on the eve of the country's 231st birthday, and being American sure doesn't feel very comfortable. Our leaders have marched us into a war that's killed over 3,500 U.S. soldiers and earned us the world's contempt. Our fear of immigrants - the kind of people from whom so many of us are descended - is making a mockery of Lady Liberty's declaration, "Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free . . . ". And Paris Hilton still lives here.
NEWS
January 24, 2007
The battle to free Independence Hall in Philadelphia has taken a promising turn - and may even be won soon. New security measures set to be unveiled today at Independence National Historical Park represent the least-offensive means of cordoning off the park's most important attractions. They'll be reviewed annually, and therefore could be relaxed further. Bicycle barricades are out. Bollards and chains are in. They provide a better way to secure the zone around Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell pavilion.
NEWS
August 1, 2006
It's not hard to imagine how the late federal Judge Edward R. Becker would react to National Park Service's plan to dissect with a huge fence the spot in Philadelphia where the Declaration of Independence was first read. He'd be mad as hell - as should every living Philadelphian. Becker, who died at 73 in May, had chambers overlooking Independence Mall. He fought to the end against the hyperbolic, post-9/11 mindset that sought fortress-like security at the birthplace of American democracy.
NEWS
May 18, 2006
With the removal this week of the old Liberty Bell Pavilion, Independence Mall visitors can now enjoy the park's beauty with a spectacular view that stretches from Independence Hall to the National Constitution Center. Among the many people they have to thank for that is the former chief, now senior, judge of the Third Circuit Court of Appeals, Edward R. Becker. Since 9/11, this federal judge whose courthouse chambers overlook the mall has put his considerable clout behind the worthwhile efforts to brush back excessive security measures at the nation's birthplace.
NEWS
March 30, 2006 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
It was hailed; it was reviled. It was opened with great fanfare; it was closed with a whimper. Now the old Liberty Bell pavilion, likened in its heyday to both a gas-station convenience hut and a glittering jewel box, is being obliterated from Independence Mall. But, in a most American twist, the pavilion will not vanish from the collective consciousness. It will be reborn as an internuncio of American freedom. All thanks to an 86-year-old Alaskan businessman with a shock of white hair and a big idea.
NEWS
March 21, 2006 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thirty years after it opened as the permanent shrine for the most sacred relic of American democracy, the Liberty Bell Pavilion yesterday sat forlorn and deconsecrated, slated for removal, a symbol of the impermanence of modern life. Officially, it was a morning of celebration - Operation Mall Vista - removal of the structure from which the bell was moved in October 2003 to give visitors an unblocked view from Independence Hall to the National Constitution Center two blocks north.
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