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NEWS
April 11, 2005 | By SUZIN W. RIGSBY
THE APRIL 6 article by Valerie M. Russ about what the people of the city stand to lose if 20 neighborhood libraries are made into Express branches does an excellent job of highlighting two important facts: 1. Denying full access to library resources in the poorest neighborhoods while continuing full service in more advantaged neighborhoods is economic discrimination. 2. Actual librarians with accredited master's degrees are the greatest resource that any library can have. There are two other facts that the public deserves to know.
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The children who attend Spring Garden Elementary often come home to no books, let alone e-readers or Internet access. Some live in a nearby homeless shelter. So when Laureal Robinson became Spring Garden's principal five years ago, she had a goal in mind: to reopen the school library with a certified librarian. "We had to adopt a back-to-basics approach," Robinson said. "We had to make it as easy as possible for children to get books in their hands. " Spring Garden's budget is just as tight as every other school's in the Philadelphia School District - it has no full-time counselor or nurse - but Robinson made reopening a library a priority.
NEWS
February 13, 2003 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alexandra Grilikhes, 70, who built a University of Pennsylvania library from a fledgling facility into a respected source of information, died Saturday of breast cancer at her home in the Roxborough section of Philadelphia. She also was an award-winning poet and novelist who taught at the University of the Arts. As director of Penn's Annenberg School for Communication Library from the late 1960s until she retired in the early 1990s, Ms. Grilikhes "built a real library," said Larry Gross, deputy dean of the Annenberg School.
NEWS
August 4, 1991 | By Jeff McGaw, Special to The Inquirer
She came, she saw, she dusted. In her nearly 10 years as the head librarian of the Union Library Company of Hatborough, Diana V. Smartt brought the library into the 20th century. And in between fund-raising, updating the collection and increasing the membership, she occasionally dusted. "I was the children's librarian, the reference librarian, the head librarian and the cleaning lady," Smartt said. Smartt, 46, gave her two weeks' notice to library board president John Zygmont on July 15, officially resigned her post as head librarian on Wednesday and began Thursday as the executive director of William Jeanes Memorial Library in Whitemarsh.
NEWS
November 16, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Katherine David Polgar, 84, a librarian for Philadelphia cultural organizations in the 1960s and 1970s, died Monday of complications from a stroke, at Crozer-Chester Medical Center. The longtime resident of Rutledge, Delaware County, had lived for the last two years at the Wallingford Nursing & Rehabilitation Center. Born in Budapest, Mrs. Polgar fled Hungary with her physician husband and their three children soon after the 1956 uprising against the Communist government. "I was 2 years old," said a son, George Jr. "To keep me quiet" during the illegal overland trip into Austria, "my father pumped me full of barbiturates.
NEWS
June 4, 1987 | By MARK McDONALD, Daily News Staff Writer
May was one tough month for Bernard J. Salera, the 41-year-old Catholic school librarian and disciple of political extremist Lyndon LaRouche. First Salera lost the Democratic mayoral primary. Now he's lost his job. Salera, the librarian at Father Judge High School since 1985, says his firing was an act of political discrimination by the Northeast school's principal, the Rev. Nicholas Waseline. Notified May 27 that his contract would not be renewed, Salera said he decided to respond by distributing to students copies of two letters he sent to school administrators.
NEWS
February 6, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ruth Carpenter Donnell spent half of the 1950s in the Far East, where her husband was in State Department postings in Malaya, Taiwan and Vietnam. Though that was an adventurous time of her life, she might be better known for being a librarian at Germantown Friends School, where she worked from 1969 into 1976. On Dec. 26, Mrs. Donnell, 89, died of pneumonia at Roxborough Memorial Hospital. She lived in Roxborough. A memorial service is set for 2 p.m. tomorrow at the Unitarian Society of Germantown, 6511 Lincoln Dr. A 1937 graduate of White Plains (N.Y.
NEWS
September 18, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Howard Frederick Roth Jr., 81, of Bryn Athyn, a retired librarian and a Korean War veteran, died of complications from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis on Wednesday, Sept. 15, at his home. From 1994 until retiring in 2004, Mr. Roth was librarian at the Swedenborg Library at the Academy of the New Church in Bryn Athyn. He was an active member of the General Church of the New Jerusalem, which follows the teachings of Emanuel Swedenborg, an 18th-century Swedish scientist, mystic, and philosopher.
NEWS
May 10, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
A memorial service will be held Saturday, May 14, for Alice F. Fullam, 90, of Wallingford, a retired librarian and the wife of retired U.S. District Judge John P. Fullam. Mrs. Fullam died Tuesday, April 12, of cancer and dementia at home. The daughter of Adolph John and Dorothy Cleary Freiheit, she was born in Akron, Ohio, and grew up in Marblehead, Mass., and suburban New York City. She graduated from Garden City High School on Long Island, and majored in psychology at Radcliffe College.
NEWS
February 10, 1993 | By Rose Simmons, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Margaret Gayley Palmer, 88, who helped make the library at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Dental Medicine one of the finest in the world, died Monday at Dunwoody Village, Newtown Square. Miss Palmer was head librarian at the school from 1933 until she retired in 1963. In those 30 years, she became one of the most respected and beloved staff members at the school, according to Pat Heller, who now heads the library. "People still asked about her," Heller said. "She was very bright, very personable and very helpful to everybody.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 10, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
A memorial service will be held Saturday, May 14, for Alice F. Fullam, 90, of Wallingford, a retired librarian and the wife of retired U.S. District Judge John P. Fullam. Mrs. Fullam died Tuesday, April 12, of cancer and dementia at home. The daughter of Adolph John and Dorothy Cleary Freiheit, she was born in Akron, Ohio, and grew up in Marblehead, Mass., and suburban New York City. She graduated from Garden City High School on Long Island, and majored in psychology at Radcliffe College.
NEWS
May 8, 2016
The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu By Joshua Hammer Simon & Schuster. 288 pp. $26 Reviewed by Jean Marie Brown This book tells of Abdel Kader Haidara's effort to save thousands of priceless manuscripts dating back centuries, manuscripts endangered when al-Qaeda seized Timbuktu, Mali, in 2012. But it is much more than a story of a rescue effort. Haidara, the central character, is an everyman who plunged into the world of ancient scripts when, at 17, his father bequeathed him the family's collection.
NEWS
April 1, 2016
ISSUE | ELLIOT L. SHELKROT A librarian for all needs and tastes As president and director of the Free Library of Philadelphia for 20 years, Elliot L. Shelkrot, who died on March 21, placed a huge bet on investing in branch libraries, particularly decrepit facilities in the lowest-income neighborhoods, for children and adults with the greatest needs for literacy and access to information (" 'Visionary' library chief," March 22). He tirelessly raised money to renovate buildings, install Internet access and computers, build child-friendly spaces for story hours, respond to community interests, and add staff (often tech-wizard teens)
NEWS
February 2, 2016
By Roz Warren A man recently defecated in the stairwell at the Ludington Library in Bryn Mawr. The deed and the person's subsequent exit from the building were both captured by the library's security cameras, and the local police circulated footage of the perp leaving the library and asked the public to help identify him. (What did he look like? An ordinary, somewhat distracted-looking middle-aged guy. If you passed him on the street, you wouldn't look at him twice.) It's safe to say that the library-going public was shocked and horrified by what he did. It's also safe to say that nobody who has ever worked at a public library was the least bit surprised.
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
The Rev. James S. Irvine, 88, associate librarian at Princeton Theological Seminary from 1966 to 1998, died of complications from Parkinson's disease on Saturday, Jan. 9, at Medford Leas, the retirement community in Medford, where he had resided since 2000. "A gentleman," said his sister-in-law, Carmela LoCicero. "Kind and very quiet. " Mr. Irvine was "a well of knowledge," she said, and when there were parlor games, "everybody fought for him" to be on their teams. Even in conversations, she said, "he always had his library voice, talking softly.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Roald Dahl's children's book Matilda is about a little girl with superpowers. That just about describes the winsome, hugely talented Mabel Tyler, who stars in the touring production currently at the Academy of Music. (Tyler is one of three girls who alternate in the role.) She delivers complicated lyrics and dialogue - some of it in Russian - and leads, with real stage presence, a cast of many children and quite a few adults. The plot makes Annie 's hard-knock life look like a walk in the park: Matilda is a brilliant little girl who is tormented by her awful parents (Cassie Silva and Quinn Mattfeld)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
The subtitle of Underneath the Lintel , now at the Lantern Theater, describes the play: An Impressive Presentation of Lovely Evidences . The evidences, "scraps" that fill a suitcase, are clues, perhaps proofs, of a mystery a librarian dedicates his life to solving. And they are indeed impressively presented by Peter DeLaurier in this entrancing solo show. Glen Berger's play at first seems merely a quaint story. One day an overdue book, a Baedeker's travel guide, is returned to a library in Holland.
NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Evald Rink, 99, formerly of Wilmington, an archivist and historical librarian with a specialty in 18th- and 19th-century printing and technology, died Friday, Aug. 14, of congestive heart failure at the home of his daughter in Kensington, Md. Born near Kadrina, Estonia, he and his wife, Hildegard, came to the United States in 1949, after the Soviet annexation of Estonia. For a while, they lived in a camp for displaced persons in Germany. Seabrook Farms in New Jersey sponsored their move to the United States.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ANN DOUGHERTY used to say she felt like Cyrano, the fictional character who wrote love letters for a fellow soldier in the famous French play by Edmond Rostand. Ann did the same for a number of male patrons of the Free Library's Rodriguez branch, including a Spanish-speaking man who wanted to woo an English-speaking woman. Ann helped him write the love letter, and the man got his first date. Alas, Ann never found out if the romance lasted. Ann was a librarian, but nothing like the librarians usually thought of as dowdy spinsters in dim rooms reeking of the dusty volumes of forgotten lore.
NEWS
February 25, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ruth E. Brown, 94, a librarian and archivist at several institutions in Philadelphia, died Saturday, Feb. 14, of cardiac disease at Cathedral Village in Roxborough, where she had lived since 1997. She was a longtime resident of Center City. An Allentown native, Ms. Brown came to Philadelphia to attend the University of Pennsylvania, and liked the city so much that she stayed. "By the time I came along in the 1950s, she had already given up her car and her driver's license," said nephew Geoffrey Brown.
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