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Library Card

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NEWS
September 15, 1991 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Once upon a time, receiving a library card was a rite of passage, a moment that children looked forward to as part of their transition to independence. Having a card in your own name meant selecting books without the help of your mother and getting closer to the day when your choices were no longer limited to the children's section. Unfortunately, the library card has lost some of its childhood appeal in the 1990s, said Bob Vatalo, headmaster of Media/Providence Friends School.
NEWS
July 24, 1986 | By Katharine Seelye, Inquirer Staff Writer
The state legislature has allotted only half the money requested by Gov. Thornburgh to implement the statewide library card known as Access Pennsylvania. The state ran a pilot project with federal money last year in which people with library cards in one-third of the state's counties could borrow books from any of the 143 participating library systems. Many of the libraries in Delaware and Montgomery Counties were included. Philadelphia was not. Neither was Pittsburgh. The pilot program was deemed a huge success by librarians and patrons.
NEWS
September 19, 2003 | By Joseph J. Kelly
You had to be 6 years old - or 5 1/2, as long as you were in first grade. This was my very first encounter with city government; the rule seemed reasonable to me. I could do it because I was going to be in first grade. I could get a library card. It was a way to get books, five at a time, and bring them home to read - for free. It was September 1953, 50 years ago. In the days before the beginning of school, I nagged my parents about taking me to the library on the first day I was "legal" in the eyes of the Free Library of Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 17, 1988
If the suspicious looking guy in the trenchcoat who was lurking around your local library is gone, you have the FBI to thank. It has called most of its agents off the job. FBI Director William S. Sessions has ordered his troops out of the book stacks and card catalogs where they ostensibly were looking for Soviet spies. There is one exception. FBI agents will still frequent specialized libraries in New York City, which the bureau says are favorite hangouts of "hostile agents," also known in FBI parlance as "co-optees.
NEWS
November 25, 1996 | By John Murawski, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The future is bearing down on the Indian Valley Public Library. The 78,000-volume library is putting its card catalog online and making it accessible to library patrons with a modem and computer at home. The library is trying to raise the $100,000 it still needs to get the computer system in place by the end of the year. The Indian Valley facility says it is the largest library in Montgomery County that is not yet automated. Some county libraries computerized their card catalogs in the late 1980s.
NEWS
April 6, 2006
IT'S TIME, once again, to examine how Democratic state Rep. Mark Cohen is spending your money. Cohen, you may remember, once charged more than $100,000 to the state in expenses for one month. This time, the Inquirer catches him charging the state $28,200 for books and magazines. Hey, Mark, ever hear of a library card?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2011
Are you a mature adult curious about those newfangled digital reading tablets? The Free Library of Philadelphia has a deal for you. Nook e-readers preloaded with best sellers and classics are available for two-week loans to library-card holders age 50 and up who owe no fines and can produce a photo ID that matches the name and address on their library card. Better yet, the library will teach you how to use the device - or any Kindle, iPad, Android or Sony e-reader you own or receive as a holiday present.
NEWS
May 8, 2010
Delaware County library patrons will be able to directly download audio books using an iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad, officials announced Friday. About 300 titles, both adult and children's books, are available for a 14-day checkout period. Users first need to download free Overdrive software available at the Apple App Store. After the software is installed, users then need to visit the online site www.delcolibraries.org and click on "download audiobooks. " A library card from one of the 26 libraries is needed.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
The Delaware County library system has received a grant of $170,130 from the William Penn Foundation of Philadelphia to support a three-year program aimed at encouraging disadvantaged youngsters to read. The program, "Look at Me! I'm Reading," is slated to begin in the fall, targeted at children ages 1 through 7. It will involve the public libraries in Collingdale, Chester, Darby Borough, Lansdowne, Folcroft, Prospect Park, Sharon Hill, Tinicum Township, Upper Darby (the municipal and Primos branches)
LIVING
January 24, 1996 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What's the most important item in your stock of job-hunting tools? It's not the resume, Einstein. Nor that awesome network of very important people you've cultivated with such care. And it's certainly not that cliche - your amazing self. Would you believe it's the lowly library card? "It's the most important thing in a job search," said management consultant Marc Dorio, author of the new The Complete Idiot's Guide to Getting the Job You Want (Alpha Books, $24.95). Why?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 3, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Van Horne did not inaugurate the move into the computer age at the Library Company of Philadelphia. When he arrived in 1985, the venerable research archive already had a Wang word processor. Van Horne quickly acquired a fax machine that used thermal paper and cost thousands of dollars. Those antediluvian days obviously are long gone. Today the Library Company - the nation's oldest library and research institution, founded by Benjamin Franklin in 1731 - is swimming in digital waters.
NEWS
April 29, 2014
I totally agree with your editorial, "No Mere Words," that libraries are important and that every school child in Philadelphia should have and utilize a library card. As the proud holder of four Vacation Reading Club certificates from the Free Library of Philadelphia (1956-1959), as the daughter of a decade-long head of the Falls of Schuylkill branch, as a retired English teacher who walked entire classes across the parking lot from Rush Middle School to the Katharine Drexel branch, as a retired English department head at A. Philip Randolph Technical High School who regularly invited the local branch librarian to freshman orientation to sign up students for cards, and as now a board member of the Friends of the Free Library, I would, under normal conditions, applaud the motive and action of awarding member cards to every student in the city.
NEWS
April 17, 2014
THERE are those of us whose memories of libraries include hushed tones, the feel of pages softened by time and handling, and, mostly, the smell of books - an intoxicating perfume of old paper, binding glue and the traces of the hundred other readers who turned those pages before us. That's as old school as it gets, especially considering today's libraries, in which actual books play a secondary role to coffee bars, computers, DVDs, CDs, community meetings...
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | BY SIOBHAN A. REARDON
WHETHER you've escaped down the shore or are keeping cool at home in the air-conditioning, summer is the perfect time for passing the lazy, hazy afternoons with a few good page-turners. To encourage everyone in Philadelphia to get reading this summer, the Free Library has issued a big challenge as part of our annual Summer Reading program: We're asking all residents of our fair city to collectively read a grand total of 20 million minutes! That may seem like a lot, but with everyone's help, we can reach this momentous goal.
NEWS
May 8, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Free Library of Philadelphia's plan to eliminate overdue book fines for children has struck a sour note with some members of City Council, who question the financial aspect of the policy and the message it sends. Councilman David Oh was among three Council members who introduced a bill last week against the move, which has been instituted in San Francisco, Milwaukee, and elsewhere. Oh, in an interview Monday, said he opposed the measure because the money from the fines, which the library estimated at $70,000, could be used to extend hours or provide resources.
NEWS
September 12, 2012 | Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - Illegal immigrants in California's largest city could use library cards to open bank accounts and access an array of city services under a plan being considered by city officials. Under the plan, anyone with proof of Los Angeles residency could get a library card, the Los Angeles Times reported. The idea is to provide a form of ID to those who cannot get a driver's license because of their immigration status. The City Council unanimously voted recently to consider the proposal, which would have Los Angeles join a growing number of cities across the nation that offer various forms of identification to illegal immigrants and others who cannot get driver's licenses because of their immigration status.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2011
Are you a mature adult curious about those newfangled digital reading tablets? The Free Library of Philadelphia has a deal for you. Nook e-readers preloaded with best sellers and classics are available for two-week loans to library-card holders age 50 and up who owe no fines and can produce a photo ID that matches the name and address on their library card. Better yet, the library will teach you how to use the device - or any Kindle, iPad, Android or Sony e-reader you own or receive as a holiday present.
NEWS
June 14, 2011
I was one of those kids who lived for the bedtime story. Having grown up during a time when television actually "signed off" for the evening, I looked forward with eager anticipation for the story my mother would read to me and my big brother Reese every night. And Mom was a gifted storyteller. When she read, she added voices and sound effects that really brought the stories to life. As we got older, Mom got books that had voice parts Reese and I would fight over representing the characters in each tale.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
If the Joan Rivers of 1980 could look at herself in 2010, she might describe Rivers 8.0 as a dirty-mouthed septuagenarian who resembles a female impersonator "doing" Joan Rivers. Two years ago Billy Sammeth, the comedian's erstwhile manager, observed that "people now see her as a plastic-surgery addict who's past her sell-by date. " That was then. Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work is now, testament to the enduring resilience and indefatigable wit of its subject. Age cannot wither her, nor Botox stale her infinite hilarity.
NEWS
May 8, 2010
Delaware County library patrons will be able to directly download audio books using an iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad, officials announced Friday. About 300 titles, both adult and children's books, are available for a 14-day checkout period. Users first need to download free Overdrive software available at the Apple App Store. After the software is installed, users then need to visit the online site www.delcolibraries.org and click on "download audiobooks. " A library card from one of the 26 libraries is needed.
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