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NEWS
May 18, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / JONATHAN WILSON
Demonstrators refused to let Villanova University close the book on the library science program without a fight when they protested Saturday night. School officials say their decision to phase out library science is due to the high cost of getting it accredited.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
BALTIMORE - For days, Melanie Townsend Diggs had the same message each time the microphones appeared. Come back, she said again and again, when the spotlight fades and normalcy returns. See us how we are meant to be seen. That moment appeared at hand at midafternoon Wednesday at the Pennsylvania Avenue branch of the city's Enoch Pratt Free Library. A half-dozen kids stared at computer screens on the first floor, and a few adults sat in the upstairs reading area. A mother pushing a stroller came through the front door.
NEWS
April 7, 1989 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 100 demonstrators gathered for a rally and candlelight vigil last night on the campus of Villanova University to protest a school decision to close the graduate program in library science. The group of library students, alumni and friends heard speakers urge the administration to keep the library school open. Then they sang a call to the barricades from Les Miserables, the popular musical, tried to burn a soggy library card in effigy, then lit candles in a silent protest.
NEWS
October 16, 1994 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Cheri Marzano-Hassett decided to become a librarian, it came as a surprise to her family and friends. For them, as others, the image of a librarian was that of an aging spinster ordering students to be quiet. Marzano-Hassett is none of the above. "People think it's strange that I'm a librarian because I talk a lot, but I tell them people are allowed to talk in the library," Marzano-Hassett said. "Of the librarians I've met, no one fits the 'Marian lady librarian' type," she said.
NEWS
March 5, 1996 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sister Mary Joanna Larock, 82, a teacher and librarian, died Sunday at St. Joseph Infirmary at the Grey Nun Motherhouse in Yardley. Sister Larock was born in Ogdensburg, N.Y., and entered the convent at age 17. She earned a bachelor's degree in education from D'Youville College in Buffalo and a master's in library science from Catholic University in Washington. She taught in parochial schools in New York, Massachusetts, and Georgia. In the late 1960s, she moved to the Philadelphia area, working as a librarian for the Grey Nun Motherhouse in Yardley and later the Mother of Divine Providence Church in King of Prussia.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | By Andy Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sue Hudson Kelton, 74, who used her training and skills in library science as a volunteer worker in large and small libraries, died Sunday at her Upper Makefield Township home. Born in Canadian, Texas, she lost her father and her mother by the time she was 13 and was raised in Paris, Texas, by her aunt, Stella Hudson Clark. A graduate of Paris High School and the Texas Women's University, she attended the University of Illinois School of Library Science, where she received a bachelor's degree in 1937, and her master's degree in 1939.
NEWS
January 3, 1991 | By Marjorie Keen, Special to The Inquirer
Before he took charge of the Atglen Public Library, William Koch was a chemical engineer handling government defense contracts. The director of Chester Springs Library formerly coached high school and college sports. And Honey Brook Community Library's head taught special education. At a time when information technology threatens to engulf library science, six of the county's 17 public libraries - Atglen, Avon Grove, Chester Springs, Honey Brook, Parkesburg and Spring City - are being operated by individuals from a variety of backgrounds who share a devotion to public service.
NEWS
August 7, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carolyn Wicker Field, 93, former coordinator of the Office of Work With Children at the Free Library of Philadelphia, died Saturday, July 24, of congestive heart failure at the Cathedral Village retirement community in Roxborough. Each year since she completed her 30-year career at the library in 1983, the Youth Services Division of the Pennsylvania Library Association has recognized the best book for youngsters by a Pennsylvania author or illustrator with its Carolyn W. Field Award.
NEWS
February 17, 1999 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
E. Elizabeth Fitzpatrick Walsh, 79, of Havertown, an associate professor at Villanova University and chairwoman of its graduate department of library science, died of a stroke Saturday at Mercy Community Hospital. Mrs. Walsh began her career at Villanova in 1958 as an instructor . She retired in 1991. In her years at Villanova, she was a source of encouragement to many school librarians now working in Philadelphia and suburban schools, said her daughter-in-law, Carolyn Walsh. Mrs. Walsh began her career as a school librarian at the former Newtown High School, now Council Rock High School in Bucks County.
NEWS
December 24, 1999 | By Matt Zager, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sister Mary Margaret Cribben, 87, of Merion, a 27-year teacher for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, member of the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas, and associate professor at Villanova University, died Wednesday at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital of heart failure. Sister Mary Margaret taught English and was a librarian at Mater Misericordiae Academy, now Merion Mercy Academy, from 1956 through 1969. She also taught at St. Matthias School in Bala Cynwyd, St. Margaret School in Narberth, and Our Lady of Lourdes School in Philadelphia.
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NEWS
May 10, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
A memorial service will be held Saturday, May 14, for Alice F. Fullam, 90, of Wallingford, a retired librarian and the wife of retired U.S. District Judge John P. Fullam. Mrs. Fullam died Tuesday, April 12, of cancer and dementia at home. The daughter of Adolph John and Dorothy Cleary Freiheit, she was born in Akron, Ohio, and grew up in Marblehead, Mass., and suburban New York City. She graduated from Garden City High School on Long Island, and majored in psychology at Radcliffe College.
NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Evald Rink, 99, formerly of Wilmington, an archivist and historical librarian with a specialty in 18th- and 19th-century printing and technology, died Friday, Aug. 14, of congestive heart failure at the home of his daughter in Kensington, Md. Born near Kadrina, Estonia, he and his wife, Hildegard, came to the United States in 1949, after the Soviet annexation of Estonia. For a while, they lived in a camp for displaced persons in Germany. Seabrook Farms in New Jersey sponsored their move to the United States.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
BALTIMORE - For days, Melanie Townsend Diggs had the same message each time the microphones appeared. Come back, she said again and again, when the spotlight fades and normalcy returns. See us how we are meant to be seen. That moment appeared at hand at midafternoon Wednesday at the Pennsylvania Avenue branch of the city's Enoch Pratt Free Library. A half-dozen kids stared at computer screens on the first floor, and a few adults sat in the upstairs reading area. A mother pushing a stroller came through the front door.
NEWS
January 20, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Evelyn Walker Armstrong, 87, of Jenkintown, an information scientist and philanthropist, died Saturday, Jan. 10, of multiple myeloma at her home in Rydal Park. Ms. Armstrong spent 43 years - from 1949 to 1992 - in scientific information services at the Merck Research Laboratories of Merck & Co. in West Point, Montgomery County, and in Rahway, N.J. As director of the Merck Literature Resources Center, she headed the design, development, and operation of eight information centers in research and operating divisions in New Jersey and Pennsylvania.
NEWS
November 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elizabeth S. Walker, 66, formerly of Philadelphia, a contralto with a resounding voice who was a longtime presence in the city's music community, died Thursday, Oct. 30, of cancer at a hospice in Pittsburgh. Known as "Betsy," Ms. Walker moved to Philadelphia in 1977 to become assistant librarian at the Curtis Institute of Music. She rose to head librarian in 1980, and retired in 2012 as the institute's director of library and information services. She was credited with steering the Curtis library into the computer age. Curtis president Roberto Diaz issued a statement describing her legacy: "Her warm presence, good humor, charm, and distinctive voice have marked the lives of many Curtis students.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lorraine L. Doyle, 89, of Merion, a Republican committeewoman in Lower Merion for more than 30 years and a powerful GOP fund-raiser, died Thursday, Oct. 30, of pneumonia at Lankenau Hospital. Mrs. Doyle served as committeewoman, getting out the vote in Ward 13, Precinct 2. But she really made her mark as treasurer of the Lower Merion-Narberth Republican Party, raising thousands of dollars as chair of the annual Lincoln Day Dinner. Her tenacity as a fund-raiser earned her the nickname "Tiger Doyle.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
David C. Munn, director of the Cherry Hill Public Library from 1980 to 1989, spent many hours watching his son go around in circles. From the time he was seven to 12, son Ward said, "I spent a lot of time in competitive speed roller skating," at rinks in Cherry Hill and Evesham. "He would drive me all over the region, bringing me to speed roller skating events," so many that after a while, "he became a timer for the events. " On Saturday, April 12, Mr. Munn, 72, of Gloucester City, a career public librarian and author of local histories, died of cancer at his home.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two uprisings now under way - each different, each far from over - show the power, and the limitations, of social media when used amid social upheaval. In the Gezi Park demonstrations in Istanbul, Turkey, demonstrators have made brilliant use of social media such as Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram to air their grievances. They've been so successful that Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, helpless to control the story, attacked Twitter as "the worst menace to society. " "It may be the first time protesters used Vine," says Turkish-born Zeynep Tufekci, assistant professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the School of Information and Library Science.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HE WAS ONE awesome Santa! At 6-foot-6, Richard A. Binder obviously had the kind and loving demeanor that kept him from scaring the pants off the little ones who wanted to get in their bids for Christmas gifts. Richard assumed his Santa role for the Christmas party given annually by the Drexel University library, where he worked for more than 25 years. Taking care of children's wishes was typical of the spirit of this man, who spent his life caring for others, serving the poor, the spiritual needs of prisoners, the needy of Iran as a Peace Corps member, among others.
NEWS
February 17, 2013
Louise G. Fradkin, 85, of Levittown, cofounder of Children of Aging Parents, a nonprofit volunteer support group, died Tuesday, Feb. 12, of natural causes at her home. Mrs. Fradkin cofounded Children of Aging Parents in 1977 after her mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer's, a disease Mrs. Fradkin herself suffered from in later years. CAPS grew into a national organization that focused on outreach and education for caregivers of the elderly. During the 1980s and 1990s, Mrs. Fradkin wrote or cowrote numerous publications related to her work, including the chapter "Caregiving" in the book Our Bodies, Ourselves, Growing Older . She also wrote and edited Aging Parents and Common Sense: A Practical Guide for You and Your Parents . Mrs. Fradkin was an associate editor of Dictionary of Eldercare Terminology and Home Care Planning . As part of her work with CAPS, Mrs. Fradkin helped organize workshops, seminars, and speaking engagements and made numerous TV appearances.
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