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NEWS
April 29, 2014
I totally agree with your editorial, "No Mere Words," that libraries are important and that every school child in Philadelphia should have and utilize a library card. As the proud holder of four Vacation Reading Club certificates from the Free Library of Philadelphia (1956-1959), as the daughter of a decade-long head of the Falls of Schuylkill branch, as a retired English teacher who walked entire classes across the parking lot from Rush Middle School to the Katharine Drexel branch, as a retired English department head at A. Philip Randolph Technical High School who regularly invited the local branch librarian to freshman orientation to sign up students for cards, and as now a board member of the Friends of the Free Library, I would, under normal conditions, applaud the motive and action of awarding member cards to every student in the city.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
David C. Munn, director of the Cherry Hill Public Library from 1980 to 1989, spent many hours watching his son go around in circles. From the time he was seven to 12, son Ward said, "I spent a lot of time in competitive speed roller skating," at rinks in Cherry Hill and Evesham. "He would drive me all over the region, bringing me to speed roller skating events," so many that after a while, "he became a timer for the events. " On Saturday, April 12, Mr. Munn, 72, of Gloucester City, a career public librarian and author of local histories, died of cancer at his home.
NEWS
March 25, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
WILLINGBORO The Willingboro Public Library has a new logo to complete its transformation as a community center for information. Alleanna Harris, 20, submitted the winning entry in the contest to replace the outdated logo. The contest began Jan. 13 and ended Feb. 17. "It's very exciting," said Harris, a junior at the University of the Arts. "This is my first major win. It makes me feel great" Two runners-up were named: Michael L. Clay, 28, a graphic designe; and Christian Freeman, both of Willingboro.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a day in 1980 when the kid walked into the Cape May Bird Observatory. He'd left Cornell and wanted a job as the person who leads the Cape May Point hawk count during the fall migration. While he was at it, the kid asked if the center's director, legendary birder Pete Dunne, wanted to see his field sketches. As Dunne recalls, they filled five loose-leaf binders. And even then, they were "just magnificent. " The kid was David Allen Sibley. By now, Sibley's depictions of birds are known to pretty much every birder in the nation because they fill his field guides.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A plan by the University of Pennsylvania to cut back on two of its branch libraries - one for engineering and the other for math, physics, and astronomy - has yielded an outcry from students and professors who say the books are critical to their studies and research. Both libraries are housed within the same campus buildings as their departments, and are heavily used by undergraduates and graduate students alike. Mathematics students, in particular, said many of the books and materials they need are not available electronically, and they must browse the library to find what they need.
NEWS
March 11, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
She got married in a hall that was once a library reading room, surrounded by rows of books. Which was no surprise. Jamie Soukup Reid loved and lived in books. The characters wandered across the page and up into her consciousness: Leopold Bloom traversing Dublin in Ulysses , Katniss Everdeen fighting dictatorship in The Hunger Games , Esperanza Cordero overcoming poverty in The House on Mango Street . And when Reid died, suddenly and young, her friends claimed selections from her shelves as mourning tokens, believing that in the space where Jamie's hand had crossed a page, they might for a moment meet again.
NEWS
March 8, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Calling library closings the "absolute worst decision" in his 20 years in elected office, Mayor Nutter took time in his budget address Thursday to apologize for the cuts he made in 2008. City Council "was right on this issue . . . and I've been determined to correct my mistake ever since," Nutter said after proposing a $2.5 million increase for the Free Library. The new funding would let the library system hire 43 people and keep all neighborhood libraries open six days a week. Since the 2008 budget cuts, most of the branch libraries have been open only five days.
NEWS
February 21, 2014
WE'RE pretty sure your local pharmacy doesn't carry a card for a 450th birthday, but that doesn't mean you can't help William Shakespeare celebrate that milestone this year. Last month, the Free Library of Philadelphia began a major, yearlong observance of the Bard of Avon that will feature a multidimensional series of programs. Not surprisingly, at the center of the celebration is Ol' Will's theatrical legacy. "Ninety percent of the programs are related to his plays," said Sandy Horrocks, the library's vice president of external affairs.
TRAVEL
February 17, 2014 | By Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
When Ronald Reagan finished his second term, he rode off to his California ranch on a wave of popularity that helped his vice president get elected to succeed him. Our last image of Richard M. Nixon was quite different. Forced to resign over the Watergate affair, he left office in disgrace. As he boarded the helicopter on the White House lawn, he gave Americans a parting gesture, his arms raised with his fingers spelling out "V" for victory as he, too, headed off to California. Soon after leaving office, Ronald Reagan was afflicted with Alzheimer's disease and spent most of his remaining life in seclusion.
NEWS
February 15, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Amid news Monday of all-American defensive end Michael Sam's announcement that he was gay, Library Company of Philadelphia curator Connie King lifted the veil on an exhibition titled, coincidentally, "That's So Gay: Outing Early America. " King could not have known that a major gay rights story would be breaking just as she launched the eight-month exhibit of mostly 19th-century archives from the venerable library. The timing, however, underscored the timelessness of a cultural evolution and civil rights struggle that remains very much a work in progress.
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