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NEWS
January 17, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
There were gaping holes, missing walls, and exposed I-beams Friday in the old Moorestown Library, where Joe Galbraith worked for 18 years. But the library's director was "not shedding any tears" for the steel and concrete "bunker" whose demolition began this week. "I can look back on it with fondness," he said, "but it's time for it to go. "This," he added, as he glanced around the main reading room of the township's new library, "is our home now. " Airy and spacious, the new building opened in July 2014, weeks after work crews had transferred its many books, CDs, maps, and periodicals from the massive, moldy concrete building that had been Moorestown's library since 1975.
NEWS
January 11, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
Published in 1865, Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland enjoyed classic status almost from the moment it hit the presses. Everyone read it, from Queen Victoria to her diplomats and soldiers who carried it to the far corners of the empire. Last year saw the 150th anniversary of its publication, and the launching of a thousand think pieces, podcasts, and reading groups on this most whimsical of children's books. In the fall, the Rosenbach Museum - which merged with the Free Library of Philadelphia in 2013 - celebrated the anniversary with a series of grand events, and even displayed Carroll's original manuscript for a few days.
NEWS
January 5, 2016
ARDMORE The Ardmore Free Library will reopen Monday after nearly a year of renovations. It's the oldest branch in the Lower Merion Library System, with parts of the building dating to 1917 and others to 1927. The renovations opened up more usable floor space, said head librarian Jane Quin, including a loft that had not been accessible to the public before. Other improvements include a new elevator, new paint and carpeting, a children's play area in the basement, and accessibility upgrades to comply with the Americans With Disabilities Act. Quin said Monday will be a soft opening, as computers and furniture are still being set up in advance of the grand opening celebration at 1 p.m. Jan. 9. "It's kind of a madhouse, but hopefully we'll be ready," she said.
NEWS
December 12, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
City officials announced Thursday a pilot program that will allow prison inmates to read books to their children through live video at neighborhood libraries. The program, called "Stories Alive," will be launched in February at three branch libraries, likely in Frankford, Nicetown, and Kensington, said Titus Moolathara, who manages prison library services for the Free Library of Philadelphia. Inmates and family members approved by the Philadelphia Prison System will have access on Saturdays to hour-long reading sessions.
NEWS
November 19, 2015 | BY KRISTEN A. GRAHAM, Inquirer Staff Writer kgraham@phillynews.com, 215-854-5146
ACROSS THE CITY, many classrooms lack what Alison Walters has cobbled together from 10-cent yard sales, book-club deals and the proceeds of side jobs she works "to support my teaching habit": a colorful, voluminous classroom library. City and school officials want to change that. Yesterday, Mayor-elect Jim Kenney, Superintendent William Hite and 30 other leaders gathered at Clara Barton Elementary to launch a $3.5 million fundraising campaign aimed at placing libraries in every Philadelphia School District elementary classroom.
NEWS
November 19, 2015 | Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Across the city, many classrooms lack what Alison Walters has cobbled together from 10-cent yard sales, book-club deals, and the proceeds of side jobs she works "to support my teaching habit": a colorful, voluminous classroom library. City and school officials want to change that. On Tuesday, Mayor-elect Jim Kenney, Superintendent William R. Hite Jr., and 30 other leaders gathered at Clara Barton School to launch a $3.5 million fund-raising campaign aimed at placing libraries in every Philadelphia School District elementary classroom.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Hearing the words of Mark Twain, Frederick Douglass, and Ulysses S. Grant come to life is a privilege and a pleasure. The same goes for interviewing the actors who portray these three American icons onstage. "I hope we do more than entertain people," says longtime Twain actor Rick Bonnette. He's the author of two literate, witty, and affecting plays in which he will appear, separately, with Leon Morgan as Douglass and Richard Gross as Grant. "When you pick three towering figures to write about," Bonnette says, "you've got an opportunity to say something.
NEWS
October 11, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
The beleaguered Kennett Public Library should hold off on its plan to move and its president should quit, according to a library-commissioned study. But library leaders say that while the report was valuable and changes are in the works, the $6 million campaign to relocate and expand is still on, and the president says she's not quitting. The study, in which 41 stakeholders, donors, and potential donors participated, was aimed at gauging interest in the capital campaign. The results were released last week, and not all of them were flattering.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
After 13 years on the road, the Moorestown Theater Company would like to build a home of its own. The nonprofit group dreams of building a new performing arts center on the site of the soon-to-be-demolished former Moorestown library. "I have not heard one person say it's a bad idea," declared company founder and promoter-in-chief Mark Morgan, whose troupe stages 14 to 16 Broadway musicals annually at churches, schools, and other venues around town. Although Moorestown contemplates using the library site for green space, parking, or additional municipal facilities, the theater company would like to lease the ground while trying to privately raise perhaps $10 million to build the performing arts center.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Got an e-card and an e-book in your "electronic wallet"? The Free Library of Philadelphia is hosting a sign-up event - a promotional show-and-tell at the Municipal Services Building with library president and director Siobhan A. Reardon - on Wednesday for its newly launched virtual library card. But the irony here - and the message that library staffers will spread - is that you no longer need to go anywhere, not even to a library branch, to claim a digital library card. The whole process can be accomplished in as little as 90 seconds just by taking your Internet-accessing self (and device)
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