FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 15, 1986
Vernon Walters, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, has declared that Americans remaining in Libya since President Reagan's order to leave that country will be prosecuted on their return to the United States. Does that include the executives of U.S. Steel, DuPont, Hess, W.R. Grace Co., and Occidental Oil, all of whom continue to operate in Libya? Don't hold your breath. D. K. Finch Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 11, 2011 | Associated Press
GENEVA - The U.N. refugee agency appealed to European countries yesterday to step up rescue efforts for people fleeing the violence in Libya, warning that hundreds have drowned in recent weeks after their overloaded boats capsized in the Mediterranean Sea. A spokeswoman for the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees said that European authorities patrolling the Mediterranean should not wait to receive distress calls from stricken vessels before offering assistance....
NEWS
April 27, 2011
By Silvio Laccetti Libya stands at a crossroads of international politics today, much as it did when it was created in the aftermath of World War II. Now, as then, the world's major powers are deciding its future. Before World War II, Libya was a colony in the Italian empire (acquired from Turkey in 1912). Actually, it had been two major colonies, Tripolitania in the west (capital at Tripoli) and Cyrenaica in the east (capital at Benghazi). Mussolini merged both with the vast interior region of Fezzan in 1934.
NEWS
November 15, 2011 | By Richard A. Oppel Jr., New York Times News Service
Herman Cain became flustered on Monday when asked to assess President Obama's policy toward Libya, raising new questions about his command of foreign policy. Video of Cain's appearance on Monday before editors and reporters at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel went viral almost immediately after it was posted online. At the interview in Milwaukee, after he was asked his thoughts on Obama's handling of Libya, Cain appeared to search for an answer: "OK, Libya," he said. "President Obama supported the uprising, correct?"
NEWS
October 21, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOAMMAR Gadhafi, Libya's dictator for 42 years until being ousted in an uprising-turned-civil war, was killed yesterday as revolutionary fighters overwhelmed his hometown of Sirte and captured the last major bastion of resistance, two months after his regime fell. Gadhafi, who was 69, is the first leader to be killed in the Arab Spring wave of uprisings that swept the Middle East, demanding the end of autocratic rulers. European leaders hailed it as a victory, Libyan exiles celebrated in the streets and the New Jersey mother of one of Gadhafi's many victims said she was treating herself to champagne.
NEWS
May 10, 2011 | By MICHELLE FAUL, Associated Press
BENGHAZI, Libya - Rebels battled Moammar Gadhafi's forces yesterday on a deadlocked front line in eastern Libya, and welcomed the first supply ship in five days to reach the besieged western port city of Misrata. The heavy fighting was reported south of Ajdabiya, a rebel-held town about 90 miles south of Benghazi, the rebel headquarters in the east. Hundreds of rebels gathered at a checkpoint outside Ajdabiya yesterday afternoon, when an AP photographer counted about 100 pickup trucks coming back from the front, each carrying four or five fighters and some with mounted submachine guns.
NEWS
December 11, 2011 | By Karin Laub, Associated Press
LEPTIS MAGNA, Libya - The breathtaking ruins of this Roman Empire port city may hold the key to a brighter economic future for Libya, which under Moammar Gadhafi was dangerously dependent on oil. Some of Libya's new leaders say the country must develop other revenue sources because even Libya's vast oil reserves - the biggest in Africa - will one day run out. Tourism, which long stagnated under Gadhafi, is one lucrative realm. "I think that that's one of the major shifts, strategically, for the economy of Libya," outgoing Finance and Oil Minister Ali Tarhouni said of the push toward economic diversity.
NEWS
June 17, 2011
WASHINGTON - Republicans and Democrats yesterday derided President Obama's claim that U.S. air attacks against Libya do not constitute hostilities and demanded that the commander in chief seek congressional approval for the 3-month-old military operation. In an escalating constitutional fight, House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, threatened to withhold money for the mission, pitting a Congress eager to exercise its power of the purse against a dug-in White House. Boehner signaled that the House could take action as soon as next week.
NEWS
April 22, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Tribune Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama on Thursday approved the use of armed Predator drone aircraft to launch air strikes against ground targets in Libya, the latest sign of mounting concern in Washington that the NATO-led air campaign has failed to stop Moammar Gadhafi's forces from shelling the besieged city of Misrata and other populated areas. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates, who announced the decision at a Pentagon news conference, said Predators with Hellfire missiles would be used to augment air strikes by warplanes from NATO nations against the intensifying attacks by forces loyal to Gadhafi.
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NEWS
September 9, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump pledged Wednesday to rebuild what he called a depleted military and said he would order the nation's top commanders to prepare a plan within 30 days of his taking office to destroy the Islamic State. "Three words should be at the center of our foreign policy, always: Peace through strength," Trump said during a 33-minute speech at the Union League of Philadelphia, which was interrupted frequently by applause from an invited audience of supporters.
NEWS
August 8, 2016
Jim DeMint is president of the Heritage Foundation and a former U.S. senator James Jay Carafano is a Heritage vice president, directing the think tank's research on issues of national security and foreign relations Terrorism was clearly trending down globally as President Obama took office, according to the University of Maryland's Global Terrorism Database. But that desirable trend has reversed, and nowhere is the upswing in terror activity more glaring than here in the American homeland.
NEWS
August 4, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Vets, shun Trump No one has the right to criticize Gold Star parents like Khizr and Ghazala Khan ("More outrage on Trump, Khans," Tuesday). Donald Trump has crossed the line of decency. In addition to saying our military is weak and that Sen. John McCain wasn't a hero for getting captured, he has criticized Muslim immigrants who lost a son defending our country. As an Army veteran and commander of American Legion Post 227, I call on all of our country's veterans' organizations to denounce Trump's candidacy.
NEWS
May 5, 2016
With both Ted Cruz and John Kasich ending their campaigns for the presidency, it now appears certain that Donald Trump will become the Republican Party's nominee. What seemed far-fetched when the "braggadocious" real estate tycoon announced his candidacy last year has become a reality that threatens to tear apart the GOP. Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus is trying to keep that from happening. "You know what, I think something different and something new is probably good for our party," he said Wednesday in an interview with CNN. But other Republicans have vowed never to support Trump, who outlasted 16 other competitors for the nomination.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
My grandmother would have had a Yiddish word for Donald Trump's "major" foreign-policy speech last week: meshugaas . That refers to something so senseless or crazy it's almost incomprehensible. Indeed, the Trump talk was so incoherent, so full of contradictions, that, in normal times, it would have been quickly relegated to the realm of late-night comics. But these aren't normal times. As Trump moves within grasp of the GOP nomination, the dangers of Trumpism are no laughing matter.
NEWS
April 2, 2016
Republican peculiarities in this political season are so numerous and lurid that insufficient attention is being paid to this: The probable Democratic nominee's principal credential, her service as secretary of state, is undermined by a debacle of remarkable dishonesty. Hillary Clinton's supposedly supreme presidential qualification is not her public prominence, which is derivative from her marriage, or her unremarkable tenure in a similarly derivative Senate seat. Rather, her supposed credential is her foreign policy mastery.
NEWS
January 16, 2016
What boxer Sonny Liston's manager said of him (Sonny had his good points, the trouble was his bad points) is true of Marco Rubio. His strengths include intelligence, articulateness, and, usually, cheerfulness. His misjudgments involve, in ascending order of importance, the Senate immigration bill of 2013, sugar, Libya, and S-590. Together these reveal a recurring penchant for ill-considered undertakings. Rubio's retreat, under withering political heat, from the immigration bill was undignified but not reprehensible.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2015 | BY ELLEN GRAY, Daily News Television Critic graye@phillynews.com, 215-854-5950
* FRONTLINE: MY BROTHER'S BOMBER. 10 tonight, Oct. 6 and Oct. 13, WHYY12. KEN DORNSTEIN'S story reads like a feature film. A man who's spent his career behind the scenes of a TV news magazine decides to leave behind his wife and two young children and sneak into Libya, a country in turmoil, in search of the people who might be responsible for the murder of his older brother, and 269 others, in the 1988 bombing of Pan Am 103. Starting tonight,...
NEWS
January 27, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
SOMERS POINT, N.J. - Their homecoming has been long awaited. Every time the remains of Navy Master Commandant Richard Somers and the crew of the USS Intrepid get the attention of leaders in Washington, world events intervene. More than 200 years ago, the seamen sailed their explosives-laden vessel into Libya's Tripoli harbor to strike a blow against a pirate fleet and died when the ship blew up. They were the first identified Americans killed in combat to be buried abroad, and their return was strongly sought by the Somers family - to no avail.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
This weekend marks the fourth anniversary of Egypt's Tahrir Square uprising, which became the hallmark of the Arab Spring. As though to mock those long-dead hopes, Yemen and Libya have collapsed, Syria lies in ruins, and much of Syria and Iraq are occupied by ISIS. Several youthful leaders of the Jan. 25, 2011, revolt have been jailed (while the Egyptian leader they ousted, Hosni Mubarak, was just freed from prison). The death last week of Saudi Arabian King Abdullah - whose successor is also old and ill - adds to the turmoil in the region.
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