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Libyan People

NEWS
March 29, 2011 | By Margaret Talev and David Lightman, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - President Obama on Monday declared the U.S.-led military intervention in Libya a success, saying that it had averted "a massacre" by longtime leader Moammar Gadhafi and that NATO's takeover of the multilateral mission this week means the United States can shift to a support role with less risk and cost. "Tonight, I can report that we have stopped Gadhafi's deadly advance," Obama said, speaking from the National Defense University in Washington. The address was designed to respond to criticism that he had not sufficiently explained the goals of the first major military involvement he has initiated abroad.
NEWS
March 28, 2011
Here is a transcript of President Obama's speech, as prepared for delivery: ------------------------------------------------ Good evening. Tonight, I'd like to update the American people on the international effort that we have led in Libya - what we have done, what we plan to do, and why this matters to us. I want to begin by paying tribute to our men and women in uniform who, once again, have acted with courage, professionalism and patriotism. They have moved with incredible speed and strength.
NEWS
March 25, 2011 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Had President Obama forcefully ostracized Moammar Gadhafi in the very first hours of the crisis in Libya, there might be no need for the no-fly zone in place there now, former National Security Adviser Stephen Hadley said Thursday in an exclusive interview. "Remember, in the opening days, the rebels were taking town after town, and Gadhafi was largely confined to Tripoli," Hadley said, speaking on the sidelines of a World Affairs Council reception. The council was holding a daylong conference at the Union League on the rapid changes in the Middle East.
NEWS
March 20, 2011 | By Angela Charlton, Associated Press
PARIS - In diplomatic terms, international military action against Libya's leader went from the brainstorming stage to the shooting-at-tanks stage with stunning speed. Saturday's launch of U.S., British, and French air strikes with Arab backing and a United Nations mandate was not universally endorsed. And it's unclear whether it will be fast enough to do what its proponents want, to shore up rebel forces and oust Libya's leader Moammar Gadhafi. But the cascade of quick, weighty decisions getting there was unusual - just one of the unusual things about this dramatic operation.
NEWS
March 19, 2011
Remarks released at 5:07 p.m. Saturday from Brazil: "Good afternoon, everybody. Today I authorized the Armed Forces of the United States to begin a limited military action in Libya in support of an international effort to protect Libyan civilians. That action has now begun. "In this effort, the United States is acting with a broad coalition that is committed to enforcing United Nations Security Council Resolution 1973, which calls for the protection of the Libyan people. That coalition met in Paris today to send a unified message, and it brings together many of our European and Arab partners.
NEWS
October 21, 1986 | BY ADRIAN LEE
Needing a good solid news peg for its latest peeve with the Reagan Administration, the press got it with the resignation of State Department spokesman Bernard Kalb. Where the press had been floundering around - and I mean floundering - trying to make a case against the Government in the so-called Libyan "disinformation" affair, it now had the Kalb resignation to go with in proving that the White House gang had "deliberately . . . intentionally . . . cynically lied" to the American people.
NEWS
May 10, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Libyan leader Moammar Khadafy has threatened to build a "line of fire" - a million armed men and women - along Libya's coast, and has said that if Americans try to invade, "they will burn, they will die. " In an appearance Thursday on Libyan television, monitored by the British Broadcasting Corp., Khadafy also repeated his threat to attack any Arab nation that permitted the U.S. Sixth Fleet to use its ports. Khadafy, who has been relatively subdued in the few appearances he has made since last month's U.S. air strike against Libya, said he would create a "confrontation line" from the coastal city of Tubruq in eastern Libya to Zuwarah in the west.
NEWS
April 27, 1986
As your editorial of April 15 states, "It is always regrettable when a nation resorts to military force. " It is particularly regrettable when this involves killing people, as it must. It is also regrettable when it is the consequence of a useless act of provocation and when there is small prospect that it will lead to a solution of the problem. Direct, violent action in response to aggressive acts has great appeal. It also is rarely the best means of resolving a conflict.
NEWS
April 16, 1986 | By DEBBIE M. PRICE, Daily News Staff Writer
The man on the telephone line was agitated and afraid. His host country was bombing his homeland, halfway around the world. "We did not expect this from this country that calls itself leader of freedom in the world. No, no, not this barbaric act," said the Libyan yesterday, who gave his name as Ali. Ali answered the telephone at the offices of the People's Committee for Students of the Socialist People's Libyan Arab Jamahiriya in McLean, Va., outside Washington, D.C. The organization is responsible for distributing the monthly Libyan government allowances to approximately 1,000 Libyan students in the United States.
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