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License Fee

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NEWS
March 24, 1989 | By Rita M. Sutter, Special to The Inquirer
Angered over a recently imposed $250 license fee by New York City officials on out-of-town limousines, about 65 Philadelphia-area limousine owners gathered yesterday to plot methods to fight the measure. The 90-minute session at Garden State Park in Cherry Hill was organized by the South Jersey Limousine Association, a professional group that sponsors training and marketing programs for the limousine business. The annual $250-a-car license, which took effect March 15, applies to 4,500 to 5,000 limousines that are based in New Jersey, Connecticut, Long Island, Westchester and Rockland Counties and pick up or drop off passengers in New York City.
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - At a time when most government agencies are going begging for funding, the state board that regulates doctors and other medical professionals in Pennsylvania has amassed a $30 million surplus. The board is so flush that 50,000 licensed physicians are getting a pass this year on license fees they pay every other year. The decision last summer to waive the fee - $360 for doctors of medicine, or M.D.s - has raised the hackles of critics who ask why not spend the money for its intended use - policing doctors - rather than giving those same professionals a two-year holiday from their license fee?
NEWS
August 26, 1999 | By Tanyanika Samuels, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
City officials want to bring a little bit of Paris to Woodbury, but it could be costly. An ordinance approved at Tuesday night's City Council meeting requires merchants on Broad Street to pay $250 for an annual license to set up sidewalk cafes in front of their businesses. City officials said they hoped the sidewalk cafes would stimulate the downtown economy and add an aesthetically pleasing touch to the business district. But a handful of merchants at the council meeting said that while they liked the idea of sidewalk cafes, the cost was not as appealing.
NEWS
June 27, 2000 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The owners of a Center City condominium tower and a Northeast apartment complex sued the city in federal court yesterday, contending their residents' equal-protection rights are being violated by the city's refusal to provide trash removal. The lawsuit by the condominium association of the Philadelphian, at 24th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, and Welsh Walnut Associates, owner of the Manchester Apartments at 2800 Welsh Rd., also challenged the constitutionality of the city's one-year-old multifamily-dwelling licensing fee. The law, enacted last June, requires condominium and apartment owners to pay the city an annual license fee of $25 per unit to a maximum annual fee of $10,000 per building.
NEWS
June 6, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Republican lawmakers in Harrisburg are contemplating a raft of changes to the state's casino gambling law, including one that could benefit Ira Lubert's Valley Forge Casino Resort, as they work through a difficult budget. They are also resurrecting discussion of legalizing Internet gambling, although that appears to be a long shot. "I think the thing driving this, more than anything, is the need for money to settle a budget, where there's not a lot of people who want to vote for a tax increase," State Sen. Tommy Tomlinson (R., Bucks)
NEWS
April 23, 1993 | By Lara Wozniak, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As the May 11 municipal commissioners election draws near, campaign charges and countercharges are taking on a harder edge. Last Friday Norman Brecht, an incumbent, handed out fliers charging that if Al Murray is re-elected mayor, Murray will try to institute a mercantile license fee. In the flier, Brecht charged that Murray said of the fee: " 'I won't bring it up until after the 1993 commissioners election in May. The businesses can write...
NEWS
September 5, 1990 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
Mantua Township has revised its dog ordinance to comply with a new state law concerning vicious and dangerous dogs, a move that could cost Mantua owners of such dogs $700 yearly for a license. At last week's Township Committee meeting, committeemen approved an ordinance requiring the owner of a dog identified as dangerous or vicious to pay a yearly license fee of $700, the maximum the new law allows. The ordinance also requires the owner of any dangerous dog impounded or destroyed by township officials to be liable for the costs of those actions.
NEWS
December 1, 1988 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The publisher of a horse racing tip sheet has saddled up the American Civil Liberties Union for a constitutional court battle. The ACLU, on behalf of Donald Bielak, publisher of "Bailey's Turf Master -The Yellow Sheet," sued Cherry Hill, its mayor and council members yesterday, saying that Cherry Hill's license fees violated Bielak's constitutional right to freedom of the press. "We are convinced that the (licensing) ordinance is an unconstitutional infringement on both free speech rights and the freedom of the press," wrote ACLU lawyer James Katz in a Nov. 9 letter to Mayor Susan Bass Levin and the township council.
NEWS
January 5, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen moved to drive most gun dealers out of business yesterday by proposing sharp increases in the licensing fee and stricter controls on people who buy and sell weapons. Hiking the annual license fee from $66 to $600 would weed out 200,000 people who purchase the license simply to take advantage of manufacturers' discounts, Bentsen said. "Why so many? It's cheap. Best bargain in town," the Treasury chief said in outlining his plan at a law-enforcement awards ceremony.
NEWS
March 3, 1994 | By Christine Schiavo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A refuse hauler is challenging the township's practice of charging trash trucks $100 each to use roads leading to the GROWS landfill. Kasper Bros. Inc., of Philadelphia, has filed a lawsuit in Bucks County Court, saying the privilege isn't worth the price. The lawsuit, which the hauler filed in January, was prompted by a $1,000 fine issued in May, after police stopped one of its trucks because it did not have a license affixed to the driver's side door as required by a township ordinance.
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NEWS
June 6, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Republican lawmakers in Harrisburg are contemplating a raft of changes to the state's casino gambling law, including one that could benefit Ira Lubert's Valley Forge Casino Resort, as they work through a difficult budget. They are also resurrecting discussion of legalizing Internet gambling, although that appears to be a long shot. "I think the thing driving this, more than anything, is the need for money to settle a budget, where there's not a lot of people who want to vote for a tax increase," State Sen. Tommy Tomlinson (R., Bucks)
NEWS
May 31, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three years after the Foxwoods Casino group lost its license to open a Philadelphia gaming hall, the former partners in the project are trying to retrieve their $50 million licensing fee in federal bankruptcy court. The Foxwoods group - also known as Philadelphia Entertainment & Development Partners (PEDP) - filed a complaint Thursday against the commonwealth and the Pennsylvania Department of Revenue. The investor group alleges that Pennsylvania's refusal to refund its money was "an unconstitutional taking" and "unjust enrichment.
NEWS
July 25, 2013
WE ALL know Pennsylvania roads and bridges are among the worst in the industrialized world. We know clogged traffic around our cities wastes time, fuel and pollutes the air. We know highways are crammed with too many trucks. We know many of the state's nearly 5,000 "structurally deficient" bridges face weight limits, which will add to the slowdowns, jam-ups and general disarray. I want you to know it's not my fault. In fact, I want you know I've done more than my share and paid more than my dues to help PennDOT over the years.
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - At a time when most government agencies are going begging for funding, the state board that regulates doctors and other medical professionals in Pennsylvania has amassed a $30 million surplus. The board is so flush that 50,000 licensed physicians are getting a pass this year on license fees they pay every other year. The decision last summer to waive the fee - $360 for doctors of medicine, or M.D.s - has raised the hackles of critics who ask why not spend the money for its intended use - policing doctors - rather than giving those same professionals a two-year holiday from their license fee?
BUSINESS
October 7, 2012 | By Mark Jewell, Associated Press
BOSTON - Index mutual fund investors are a cost-conscious bunch. Rather than seek out managers with a good shot at beating the market, they parse tiny differences in fund expenses. Index funds are cheaper because no one is being paid to pick stocks. Every cent that doesn't end up in someone else's pocket counts, the thinking goes. If that's your mindset, you'll want to pay attention to an aspect of index fund expenses that's drawing greater scrutiny: fees that fund companies pay to license benchmark indexes.
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
HARRISBURG — The license that was revoked for the ill-starred Foxwoods Casino project in South Philadelphia could soon be up for grabs — with bidding starting at $65 million. Pennsylvania legislators in the House are poised to approve legislation as early as Tuesday to hold a statewide auction for the coveted license. The minimum bid, according to the legislation, would be $65 million, and the state Gaming Control Board would have the ultimate say over where, and to whom, the new casino should go. "This would let the free market determine what price we would get for the casino," said Rep. Curt Schroder (R., Chester)
NEWS
February 11, 2011 | By BOB WARNER, warnerb@phillynews.com 215-854-5885
A consulting firm hired by City Council is reportedly headed toward a lower estimate for the cost of the controversial DROP deferred-retirement plan, but it's still big enough - about $100 million, sources say - for the program to remain an albatross for the city's incumbent politicians. A Boston College study done last year for the Nutter administration concluded that DROP had cost the city pension fund $258 million over the past 10 years. The study commissioned by Council, from the actuarial firm Bolton Partners in Baltimore, has reportedly found several flaws in the earlier analysis, sources said.
NEWS
February 14, 2010 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The legislation was supposed to resolve a long-standing problem: the absence of an off-road recreation park for hundreds of thousands of all-terrain vehicle riders across New Jersey. Lawmakers and conservationists hoped the measure - signed last month by then-Gov. Jon S. Corzine - would discourage the prohibited use of private land and protected areas such as the Pinelands. It requires operators to obtain licenses and register their vehicles, and pay for registration fees, insurance, and penalties for illegal riding on ATVs, dirt bikes, and snowmobiles.
NEWS
December 12, 2009 | By Amy Worden and Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Lawmakers departed yesterday for the annual Pennsylvania Society weekend of politicking and socializing in New York City, leaving unfinished business with broad statewide implications. After days of closed-door vote wrangling and one spirited late-night debate, the long-promised bill to add table games at slots parlors - and hundreds of millions of dollars to state coffers - failed to reach a floor vote. While offering reasons for the holdup, lawmakers in the House and Senate still voiced confidence yesterday that they would pass the legislation before recessing for the holidays on Wednesday.
NEWS
July 5, 2008
Three tour guides were pretty clever to wave the Bill of Rights in their legal protest this week over Philadelphia's new licensing of paid historic-area tour operators. After all, free speech is a big deal in this town, where - as actual historians remind us - it was written into the Constitution. The guides, Ann Boulais, Michael Tait and Joshua Silver, filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday seeking to derail the October launch of the tour-guide licensing rules. A city ordinance signed by Mayor Nutter in April mandates that paid guides be tested on their historical knowledge (in addition to paying a fee and proving they have insurance)
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