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Lieberman

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NEWS
January 4, 2007
AT THE END OF a facile letter of advice to Democrats, Brian Walsh (Dec. 26) questions the inclusiveness of Democrats by citing the example of Sen. Joseph Lieberman - strongly supported in the primary by party stalwarts from around the country, but who nonetheless lost to Ned Lamont. Lamont challenged Lieberman because the Connecticut senator consistently voted against Democratic positions - from judicial nominations, to foreign policy, to Medicare, to taxation. It was when Lieberman formed his own party (to challenge the results of the primary)
NEWS
August 9, 2000
This survey was compiled by staffers Anthony York, Alicia Montgomery and Daryl Lindsey of Salon, the on-line magazine (www.salon.com), where it first appeared. Al Gore's selection of Sen. Joseph Lieberman as his running mate has met with glowing reviews. As the first Jew to be selected for a national ticket, Lieberman has non-party-line views on such issues as school vouchers, Social Security and President Clinton's affair with Monica Lewinsky that have been embraced by Republicans, while few Democrats have publicly criticized the selection.
NEWS
October 14, 2003 | By Steven Thomma INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman yesterday proposed raising taxes on the wealthy and cutting taxes for everyone else, becoming the latest Democrat running for president to challenge President Bush on tax cuts. Lieberman, of Connecticut, said he would cut taxes for those making less than $114,000 a year and raise taxes for those making more than $150,000 a year. He vowed to cut the federal budget deficit each year in office and balance the budget in eight years. "The idea is simple," Lieberman said in a speech in Manchester, N.H., where he attempted to jump-start his sluggish campaign with the announcement.
NEWS
August 9, 2000 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The idea of a Jewish vice president will not seem brand-new to those who saw "Deterrence," a recent thriller in which a Jewish VP actually becomes president of the United States. "I think it's obvious that Al Gore got the idea of having a Jewish vice president from me," joked Rod Lurie, the writer and director of this "far-fetched" Hollywood scenario, which starred Kevin Pollak. Lurie, who is Jewish, admits that he thought it would never happen in real life. "I think when I made the film I was so convinced there was no possibility of a Jew being elected president or vice president that I had to create a series of accidents to make it plausible," said the director, whose Jewish character replaces a scandal-plagued VP (shades of Spiro Agnew)
NEWS
August 10, 2011
Bail was set at $50,000 Tuesday for a Center City man arrested a week ago and charged with threatening U.S. Sen. Joseph Lieberman (Ind., Conn.). Dmitry Dyatlov will remain in custody until authorities set up a system to monitor his computer electronically. Under terms of his release, he will be confined to his apartment. An FBI arrest affidavit filed in federal court Aug. 3 said that Dyatlov, 23, an information technology consultant, posted a blog threat to "shoot [Lieberman] in the face (many times)
NEWS
August 17, 2000 | By Jodi Enda and Mark Bowden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman, an Orthodox Jew with a reputation for moral rectitude, broke a historic barrier last night as he addressed the nation as the Democrats' choice for vice president and told Americans he would "work my heart out" to elect Al Gore president. The Connecticut senator's speech electrified the Democrats who packed the Staples Center and hailed Lieberman - the first Jewish candidate on a major party's national ticket - as proof that theirs is the real party of diversity.
NEWS
August 8, 2000 | By David Boldt
Seldom have I heard Sen. Joseph Lieberman speak - and I have heard him speak a lot - without wondering: "Why don't the Democrats run this guy for president?" Or at least vice president. Lieberman is no spellbinder, but he exudes intelligence and decency and is refreshingly at ease with piety and patriotism. His candor and authenticity remind me of one-time Republican presidential contender John McCain, with whom Lieberman has cosponsored legislation. Lieberman's addition to the Democratic ticket should benefit Al Gore's candidacy, and no doubt there will be plenty of analysts who will say Lieberman was the obvious choice all along.
NEWS
August 8, 2006 | By Tom Infield and Leonard Fleming INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Democrats from Pennsylvania and New Jersey have contributed almost $400,000 to help U.S. Sen. Joe Lieberman defeat a challenger in today's Connecticut primary. If Lieberman loses, as polls suggest he might, those Democrats may be forced to make a choice: Will they stand by Lieberman if he runs as an independent candidate this fall? Or will they accept the primary verdict and not oppose the Democratic nominee? Lieberman has been collecting signatures to run as an independent should he choose to. Mark Aronchick, a former chancellor of the Philadelphia Bar Association and longtime Democratic fund-raiser, said the choice, for him, would be "a torment.
NEWS
August 18, 2000 | By Alvin S. Felzenberg
Democrats think they have found a way to transcend the schizophrenia that characterized their convention: They will present their tired, shopworn message through more likable messengers. They are gambling that voters will fall so in love with their newest national figure that they will not listen too closely to what he says. That strategy was much in evidence in Sen. Joseph Lieberman's eloquent and stunning vice presidential acceptance speech Wednesday night. Lieberman's talk was appealing not for what he said but for who he is: the son of hard-working immigrants, a good and decent man, a person of faith, and the first Jew to join a national ticket.
NEWS
August 8, 2000 | By Murray Dubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sen. Joseph Isadore Lieberman will not be eating shrimp kabob or pork barbecue on the campaign trail. Nor will he be answering a phone on Saturday mornings or traveling to that next airport news conference after sundown on a Friday night. The junior senator from Connecticut is one of the Senate's 11 Jewish members, but is its only Orthodox Jew. Lieberman, now the Democratic vice presidential candidate, is a member of one of Judaism's least-understood branches, one that is observant of ancient laws, customs and values but one with a number of sects and divisions, from the black-clothed, bearded and insular Lubavitch Jews in Brooklyn's Borough Park to clean-shaven, urbane public servants like Lieberman.
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NEWS
April 2, 2013 | BY JOHN BAER, Daily News Political Columnist
IT'S EITHER a case of "gee, what a coincidence" or "guess some things never change. " On March 7, Senate Republican Leader Dominic Pileggi was hosted at a political fundraiser in Pittsburgh co-sponsored by Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission Chairman William Lieberman. The $1,000-a-head event was held at a private downtown venue, the Rivers Club. The invitation reads, "Please make checks payable to: 'Friends of Dominic Pileggi,'" and notes, "We are permitted to accept unlimited personal, partnership, sole proprietorship or PAC donations.
NEWS
December 24, 2012 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Senators bickered Sunday over who's to blame for sending the country lurching toward a year-end "fiscal cliff," bemoaning the lack of a deal days before the deadline but bridging no differences in the debate. With the collapse Thursday of House Speaker John Boehner's plan to allow tax rates to rise on million-dollar-plus incomes, Sen. Joe Lieberman said: "It's the first time that I feel it's more likely we'll go over the cliff than not," meaning that higher taxes for most Americans and painful federal agency budget cuts would be in line to go into effect automatically.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Josef Federman, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Israel's powerful foreign minister was charged Thursday with breach of trust for actions that allegedly compromised a criminal investigation into his business dealings, throwing the country's election campaign into disarray just weeks before the vote. While Avigdor Lieberman was cleared of more serious allegations, the indictment sparked calls for the controversial politician to step down. He declined to do so at a news conference but said he would consult with his lawyers on what to do next.
NEWS
June 28, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul Rieser testified that he and his wife, Irene, had tried since the end of 2008 to make contact with her elderly parents, Leonard and Doris Houck. The locks had been changed at the Houcks' home in the 3900 block of Kirkwood Road in the Torresdale section of Northeast Philadelphia, the phones went unanswered, and Rieser said the only person who answered the door, the Houcks' adult son, Thomas, kept him outside. "He didn't want me to disrupt my mother- and father-in-laws' routine," said Rieser.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Laurie Kellman and Calvin Woodward, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Senators investigating the Secret Service prostitution scandal said Wednesday that dozens of reported episodes of misconduct by agents point to a culture of carousing in the agency and urged Director Mark Sullivan to get past his insistence that the romp in Cartagena was a one-time mistake. The disconnect between the senators and Sullivan reappeared again and again throughout the two-hour hearing, even as the Secret Service chief for the first time apologized for the incident that tarnished the elite presidential protection force.
NEWS
April 23, 2012 | By Tom Raum and Alicia Caldwell, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The chairman of a House committee investigating an alleged Secret Service prostitution scandal predicted more firings as key lawmakers and a top adviser to President Obama expressed confidence Sunday that the agency will effectively deal with the incident. "Every possible lead is being examined," said Rep. Peter King (R., N.Y.), who heads the House Homeland Security Committee. King said he expected that in the "near future, several other" members of the Secret Service will leave.
NEWS
August 10, 2011
Bail was set at $50,000 Tuesday for a Center City man arrested a week ago and charged with threatening U.S. Sen. Joseph Lieberman (Ind., Conn.). Dmitry Dyatlov will remain in custody until authorities set up a system to monitor his computer electronically. Under terms of his release, he will be confined to his apartment. An FBI arrest affidavit filed in federal court Aug. 3 said that Dyatlov, 23, an information technology consultant, posted a blog threat to "shoot [Lieberman] in the face (many times)
NEWS
August 9, 2011 | By Michael Hinkelman, DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia man who was arrested a week ago for allegedly threatening U.S. Senator Joseph Lieberman (I-CT) was released on bail Tuesday afternoon. Dmitri Dyatlov's computer will be monitored electronically and he can't leave his apartment. He will remain in custody until authorities set up the monitoring system. An FBI arrest affidavit filed in federal magistrate court on August 3 said that Dyatlov, 23, an information technology consultant, posted a blog threat to "shoot (Lieberman)
NEWS
April 14, 2011 | Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Israel's attorney general announced yesterday that he plans to indict the foreign minister on corruption charges but will allow him a standard final hearing before a charge sheet is issued. If Avigdor Lieberman is indicted, it would likely force him to resign, badly shaking the coalition government of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, possibly forcing an election and putting already stalled Israel-Palestinian peace efforts off for many months. Lieberman denied the allegations, which include money laundering.
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