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Life Expectancy

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FOOD
December 20, 2007 | By Erin White, FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM
Holiday cooking means breaking out an arsenal of ingredients that hardly see the outside of the pantry for the rest of the year. Or maybe years. Should you really use that brown sugar you bought four years ago? Is it OK that last year's allspice looks a little crusty? This year, instead of stressing, use this guide to help determine whether you can still use those holiday holdovers and everyday staples.  
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2011 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Columnist
After last week's column, several readers wrote in to suggest that perhaps I could not tell the difference between Audrina Patridge and Whitney Port, two airheads from MTV's docudrama The Hills . Guilty. But in my own defense, I don't think Patridge and Port can either. Anyway, from here on out, I have an alibi for any and all errors: I'm in a terrible hurry due to the fact that I don't have much time left on this Earth. A study released by Australian researchers this week finds that TV watching after age 25 dramatically reduces life expectancy.
NEWS
March 17, 2011 | Associated Press
ATLANTA - U.S. life expectancy has hit another all-time high, rising above 78 years. The estimate of 78 years, 2 months is for a baby born in 2009 and comes from a preliminary report released Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 2.4 million people died in the United States in 2009 - roughly 36,000 fewer deaths than the previous year. Deaths were down for a range of causes, from heart disease to homicide, so experts don't think there is one simple explanation for the increase in life expectancy.
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - The gap in life expectancy between black and white Americans is smaller than it has ever been, thanks largely to a decline in the number of deaths resulting from heart disease and HIV infection, a new analysis has found. The bad news is that the gap is still large: A black baby boy born today can expect to live 5.4 fewer years, on average, than his white counterpart, and a black baby girl will die 3.7 years earlier, on average, than her white counterpart. What's more, the narrowing of the gap between 2003 and 2008 is due in part to a troubling development among whites: They are more likely than in the past to die from overdoses of prescription medications like OxyContin and Vicodin, along with other unintentional poisonings.
NEWS
January 11, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - The United States suffers far more violent deaths than any other wealthy nation, due in part to the widespread possession of firearms and the practice of storing them at home in a place that is often unlocked, according to a report released Wednesday by two of the nation's leading health-research institutions. Gun violence is just one of many factors contributing to lower U.S. life expectancy, but the finding took on urgency because the report comes less than a month after the shooting deaths of 26 people at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn.
NEWS
March 27, 2005 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The nation's latest mortality statistics show that men are catching up to women in the life expectancy race, or it could be that women are simply slowing down. But the good news from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which released the preliminary report earlier this month, is that life expectancy for all Americans, male and female, has reached an all-time high. Data announced by the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics listed life expectancy at 77.6 years in 2003, the most current figure, up from 77.3 in 2002.
NEWS
March 25, 1999 | by Thomas Lynch
The news that humans' life span might be doubled in the next century is cause for sober and deliberate contemplation. Dr. Gregory Stock of the School of Medicine at UCLA, encouraged by experimental successes with roundworms and fruit flies, bats and canaries, and mice of different sizes, impaneled his colleagues in the allied sciences to discuss what one attendee calls "the big enchilada" - the prospect of humans reconfigured to live 150 or 200 years....
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A new study offers more evidence that life expectancy for some U.S. women is falling, a disturbing trend that experts can't explain. The latest research found that women younger than 76 are dying at higher rates than in previous years in nearly half of the nation's counties - many of them rural and in the South and West. For men, life expectancy has held steady or improved in nearly all counties. The study is the latest to spot this pattern, especially among disadvantaged white women.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
As we've known for some time, life expectancy in the United States is lower than in nearly every other developed country. What we haven't known is why - and the reasons are starting to look far less simple than, say, a disjointed health-care system. Although life expectancy is expressed as an old age - 75.6 years for American men born in 2007, 80.8 years for women - much of the difference between the United States and other nations is due to what happens earlier. "We die more at younger ages," says Jessica Y. Ho, whose study of the gap in mortality for those under age 50 was published this month in Health Affairs . For men, those younger deaths accounted for 67 percent of the shortfall in U.S. life expectancy compared with an average of 16 other high-income nations.
NEWS
September 6, 1995 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When demographer James Vaupel's daughter, Anna, was born in 1984, he ran some calculations: Anna, and American girls like her, would live to age 100. S. Jay Olshansky's daughter, Jessica, was born the same year. When Olshansky, also a demographer, read of Vaupel's research, he made his own estimate: Jessica and her peers had a life expectancy of merely 85. Little Jessica wasn't too happy when she learned about the predictions. "Daddy," she told her father, "I hope your friend's right.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 28, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not that the campers, counselors, and therapists who come together every year in Oxford, Chester County, had forgotten the reality of death that is part of living with HIV/AIDS. How could they? The mission of Camp Dreamcatcher is to provide care, services, and a fun seven days for youth affected by the disease. It had been more than a decade since Camp Dreamcatcher lost one of its own. Then, when counselor Evan Jones died three years ago at 22, his death shook the camp. The response was to turn grief into action.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Can you wait until your 70th birthday? Timing is everything when it comes to Social Security, and the calculus behind it is so complex that even financial planners have trouble. About two-thirds of Americans get more than half their retirement income from Social Security. "It's the single most important decision about your finances," advises Dave Littell, retirement income program director at the American College in Bryn Mawr. "And we don't make it very carefully. " But that decision tree has two stark branches: when to retire from working, versus when to elect taking Social Security.
NEWS
July 20, 2013 | By Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
ATLANTA - If you're 65 and living in Hawaii, here's some good news: Odds are you'll live another 21 years. And for all but five of those years, you'll likely be in pretty good health. Hawaii tops the charts in the government's first state-by-state look at how long Americans age 65 can expect to live, on average, and how many of the remaining years will be healthy ones. Retirement-age Mississippians fared worst, with about 171/2 more years remaining and nearly seven of them in poorer health.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
As we've known for some time, life expectancy in the United States is lower than in nearly every other developed country. What we haven't known is why - and the reasons are starting to look far less simple than, say, a disjointed health-care system. Although life expectancy is expressed as an old age - 75.6 years for American men born in 2007, 80.8 years for women - much of the difference between the United States and other nations is due to what happens earlier. "We die more at younger ages," says Jessica Y. Ho, whose study of the gap in mortality for those under age 50 was published this month in Health Affairs . For men, those younger deaths accounted for 67 percent of the shortfall in U.S. life expectancy compared with an average of 16 other high-income nations.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A new study offers more evidence that life expectancy for some U.S. women is falling, a disturbing trend that experts can't explain. The latest research found that women younger than 76 are dying at higher rates than in previous years in nearly half of the nation's counties - many of them rural and in the South and West. For men, life expectancy has held steady or improved in nearly all counties. The study is the latest to spot this pattern, especially among disadvantaged white women.
NEWS
January 24, 2013
WALTHAM, MASS. - Smokers who quit by around age 40 can stave off an early death, according to a landmark study - published Wednesday in the online version of the New England Journal of Medicine - that fills key gaps in knowledge of smoking-related health ills. While smokers who never stop lose about a decade of life expectancy, those who quit between ages 35 and 44 gained back nine of those years, the study found. Quitting young, before age 35, erased the entire decade of lost life expectancy.
NEWS
January 16, 2013
TO THOSE who insist that we pay unquestioning homage to "American exceptionalism," here's an example to add to your list: Americans pay more, by far, in health care than any of the other richest countries in the world, but live shorter and sicker lives than the people in the world's 16 other richest countries, including Western Europe, Canada, Japan and Australia. Among these countries, American men have the shortest life expectancy. American women's life expectancy is second to last.
NEWS
January 11, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - The United States suffers far more violent deaths than any other wealthy nation, due in part to the widespread possession of firearms and the practice of storing them at home in a place that is often unlocked, according to a report released Wednesday by two of the nation's leading health-research institutions. Gun violence is just one of many factors contributing to lower U.S. life expectancy, but the finding took on urgency because the report comes less than a month after the shooting deaths of 26 people at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2012 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Enjoy the holidays, but remember year-end is fast approaching and it is time to ask yourself and your spouse: Have you taken your minimum required distribution from your retirement accounts? Most people have not. According to one November 2012 survey by Fidelity, 65 percent of their customers who are retirees had not yet taken their required distributions for the year. Be warned: This can be a costly mistake and can result in paying out significant tax penalties. So what are you waiting for?
NEWS
November 12, 2012
Exercise, the fountain of youth, promotes health, extends life Here's a simple way to live a longer and healthier life: exercise. A new study from the National Cancer Institute found that staying physically active after age 40 seems to increase your lifespan between two and seven years. And the more you exercise, the longer your life expectancy, regardless of your weight. Even if you now do nothing, "doing just a few minutes of physical activity a day can result in a notable increase in life expectancy," said NCI researcher Steven Moore.
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