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Life Partners

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NEWS
April 23, 1998 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
After more than 12 hours of dueling clergy, name-calling, parliamentary maneuvers and interminable delays, City Council for the first time ever reported out a package of bills that would establish a series of health and other benefits for same-sex "life partners. " The late-night action on the bills, which could get a final vote May 7, constituted a rare defeat for Council President John Street, who has opposed any kind of domestic-partnership legislation in the past. But while supporters crowed about their victory, and given Street's intransigent gamesmanship through the day they were well within their rights, it was not a total vindication.
NEWS
December 7, 2004 | By Frederick Cusick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The city acted within its powers six years ago when it extended benefits to the same-sex "life partners" of its employees, the state Supreme Court ruled yesterday. The Supreme Court overturned a two-year-old Commonwealth Court decision that held that the city had overstepped its authority in the 1998 ordinance that awarded same-sex couples employee benefits. In 2002, Commonwealth Court ruled that the way the city went about awarding the benefits amounted to an effort to amend the state's marriage law, something that only the state government is legally permitted to do. In writing for the court, however, Justice Russell M. Nigro rejected Commonwealth Court's reasoning.
NEWS
October 24, 1999 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first anniversary of the city's life-partner legislation was observed this month with apple cider and cookies in Conversation Hall and a ceremony for the latest crop of same-sex couples seeking official recognition of their relationships. As of last week, 146 gay and lesbian couples had received city documents affirming their partnerships, a move that entitles them to legal and financial benefits once reserved for married couples. And as controversial as the life-partner legislation was when it passed, its first year of operation has been mostly trouble-free.
NEWS
September 30, 2002 | By Stacey L. Sobel
Philadelphia did the right thing by its employees and citizens when it passed domestic partnership ordinances in 1998, allowing gay and lesbian couples to register as life partners. These laws were designed to treat people in same-sex relationships fairly. Now, a Pennsylvania appellate court has struck down these laws by mistakenly deciding that the city tried to duplicate marriage. These laws are not equal to marriage. Let's consider what a marriage really looks like under Pennsylvania law. Marriage is a status that results in hundreds of legal consequences.
NEWS
April 24, 1998
For Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua and many Protestant ministers who strongly oppose the "life partners" legislation before City Council, it is a moral issue. For Episcopal Bishop Charles E. Bennison Jr. and for other Protestant and Jewish clergy, it's also a moral issue - but they support the three bills. The legislation, which Council will vote on in two weeks, would allow gay and lesbian partners of city employees to qualify for medical benefits, exempt gay and lesbian couples from the real estate transfer tax, as married couples are, and allow city employees to designate anyone, regardless of relationship, to receive their pension benefits.
NEWS
April 22, 1998 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
When City Council chambers fill this morning with gays and lesbians, Catholics and African-American ministers - people for and against three bills that aim to extend benefits to same-sex life partners - the spotlight will be on the "Fragile Five. " There's Anna Verna, a Catholic who wants to be the next Council president, and Thacher Longstreth, a close ally of Council President John Street, who has adamantly opposed the bills in any form since becoming Council president in 1992.
NEWS
June 3, 2009 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Texas company has settled for $250,000 a lawsuit brought by a Pennsylvania woman with AIDS who alleged that the firm broke its promise to pay her health-insurance premiums. The settlement check was received Monday and the plaintiff, identified as M. Smith in the lawsuit, will get the entire sum and use it to arrange for her own health insurance, said Ronda B. Goldfein, executive director of the nonprofit AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania. The settlement was reached last week, Goldfein said.
NEWS
December 8, 2004
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court delivered an important, welcome statement Monday when it upheld a Philadelphia ordinance that extends benefits to the same-sex "life partners" of city employees. The unanimous ruling vindicates a principle that City Hall first put into writing in 1998 - that an employee's sexual orientation should not be a barrier to fair and equitable treatment by an employer. The decision entitles a partner who is in a committed relationship with a city employee to receive certain limited benefits, such as health care.
NEWS
October 14, 2011 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Councilman Bill Green introduced a bill Thursday that would extend ethics rules to same-sex partners, but it was his partnership with an unlikely cosponsor - Mayor Nutter - that made the gesture notable. Green, son of a former mayor, is widely thought to covet Nutter's job and rarely wastes an opportunity to play the mayor's foil. But in a possible sign of detente between the two, Green introduced legislation on Nutter's behalf that would extend ethics rules to same-gender "life partners" of city workers.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Free-form crooner Georgia Anne Muldrow is a practiced hand. The California native, specializing in spacey electronica, has been making records since 2006 under her own name, in collaboration with hip-hop artists Sa-Ra and J*DaVeY. She's also long partnered with rapper Dudley Perkins (a.k.a. Declaime) as G&D (they're also handsome life partners). With her new Stones Throw album Seeds, Muldrow makes her best artistic gesture, with bold, existential riffs on community (universal and personal)
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, For The Inquirer
Pete Townshend was 28 in 1973 when The Who released Quadrophenia , the rock opera about a 1960s teenage Mod named Jimmy, whose fractured self reflected the personalities of all four members of the explosive British band. The windmilling Who guitarist, the most self-consciously analytic of the great baby-boom-era songwriters, had hardly reached the old age that eight years earlier, in "My Generation," he would have hoped he'd die before attaining. But when Townshend wrote Quadrophenia - which he performed Saturday in its entirety along with front man Roger Daltrey and eight other musicians at a sold-out Wells Fargo Center - he was nearly a decade removed from the torturous teenage subject matter he chronicled in the most highly ambitious song cycle of his career.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2012 | Carolyn Hax
Question: How much am I obligated to my boyfriend to try to find treatment for medical problems that make it impossible for me to have children? I've been shuttled around to various doctors for the last year and a half. The invasive tests and doctor's fees are taking a huge toll on my emotional health and my pocketbook. My boyfriend wants me to keep trying everything and anything. What should I do? Answer: Stop for now, of course. "It's your body" is the last word, well, phrase, on this subject.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Free-form crooner Georgia Anne Muldrow is a practiced hand. The California native, specializing in spacey electronica, has been making records since 2006 under her own name, in collaboration with hip-hop artists Sa-Ra and J*DaVeY. She's also long partnered with rapper Dudley Perkins (a.k.a. Declaime) as G&D (they're also handsome life partners). With her new Stones Throw album Seeds, Muldrow makes her best artistic gesture, with bold, existential riffs on community (universal and personal)
NEWS
October 14, 2011 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Councilman Bill Green introduced a bill Thursday that would extend ethics rules to same-sex partners, but it was his partnership with an unlikely cosponsor - Mayor Nutter - that made the gesture notable. Green, son of a former mayor, is widely thought to covet Nutter's job and rarely wastes an opportunity to play the mayor's foil. But in a possible sign of detente between the two, Green introduced legislation on Nutter's behalf that would extend ethics rules to same-gender "life partners" of city workers.
NEWS
June 3, 2009 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Texas company has settled for $250,000 a lawsuit brought by a Pennsylvania woman with AIDS who alleged that the firm broke its promise to pay her health-insurance premiums. The settlement check was received Monday and the plaintiff, identified as M. Smith in the lawsuit, will get the entire sum and use it to arrange for her own health insurance, said Ronda B. Goldfein, executive director of the nonprofit AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania. The settlement was reached last week, Goldfein said.
NEWS
December 8, 2004
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court delivered an important, welcome statement Monday when it upheld a Philadelphia ordinance that extends benefits to the same-sex "life partners" of city employees. The unanimous ruling vindicates a principle that City Hall first put into writing in 1998 - that an employee's sexual orientation should not be a barrier to fair and equitable treatment by an employer. The decision entitles a partner who is in a committed relationship with a city employee to receive certain limited benefits, such as health care.
NEWS
December 7, 2004 | By Frederick Cusick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The city acted within its powers six years ago when it extended benefits to the same-sex "life partners" of its employees, the state Supreme Court ruled yesterday. The Supreme Court overturned a two-year-old Commonwealth Court decision that held that the city had overstepped its authority in the 1998 ordinance that awarded same-sex couples employee benefits. In 2002, Commonwealth Court ruled that the way the city went about awarding the benefits amounted to an effort to amend the state's marriage law, something that only the state government is legally permitted to do. In writing for the court, however, Justice Russell M. Nigro rejected Commonwealth Court's reasoning.
NEWS
April 14, 2004 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's benefits for same-sex partners represent an illegal city effort to redefine marriage, a lawyer seeking to overturn the law told the Pennsylvania Supreme Court yesterday. Dennis Abrams said City Council's landmark 1998 gay-rights laws overstepped Philadelphia's legal authority in creating life-partnership status. He called that status analogous to marriage. "The City of Philadelphia, I submit, doesn't have the right to do that," Abrams said. He argued that only the state has the right to define marriage.
NEWS
October 26, 2002 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wearn D. and Margaret G. Heinz, both 85, partners in a landmark Juniata Park tavern as well as a marriage that lasted 60 years, died within hours of each other Tuesday. Mr. Heinz died at 6:45 a.m. of complications associated with kidney cancer at Doylestown Hospital. Seven hours later, Mrs. Heinz died of colon cancer at Green Leaf Nursing Home in Doylestown, where the couple had been residents. For more than 50 years, Mr. Heinz was associated with the Church, a neighborhood tavern in Juniata Park.
NEWS
September 30, 2002 | By Stacey L. Sobel
Philadelphia did the right thing by its employees and citizens when it passed domestic partnership ordinances in 1998, allowing gay and lesbian couples to register as life partners. These laws were designed to treat people in same-sex relationships fairly. Now, a Pennsylvania appellate court has struck down these laws by mistakenly deciding that the city tried to duplicate marriage. These laws are not equal to marriage. Let's consider what a marriage really looks like under Pennsylvania law. Marriage is a status that results in hundreds of legal consequences.
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