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Life Story

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2009 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Going by its title, you might think Rock Prophecies had something to do with Nostradamus' predicting the rise of the Jonas Brothers, or some similarly uncanny feat of seeing into the musical, or geological, future. That's not the case. Instead, the poorly chosen title of John Chester's documentary about Robert Knight is meant to imply that the music photographer's ability to home in on young talent destined for greatness qualifies him as some sort of rock prophet. Which is a reach, to put it mildly.
NEWS
March 18, 2013 | By Mike Baker, Associated Press
OLYMPIA, Wash. - Behind his sunglasses, Rep. Cyrus Habib is trying to remember the name of a fully blind politician who came before him. This was someone who served many years ago, Habib recalls. In the U.S. Senate. The grandfather of writer Gore Vidal. Habib rattles off a few details before surrendering: "Let me look him up. " Turning to a laptop that provides him constant audio feedback, Habib needs just 23 seconds to launch his Internet browser, run a query, and find the information - a biographical overview of former Oklahoma Sen. Thomas Gore.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2009 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
With Bluewater Comics quickly gaining a reputation as the Biography Channel of the comics industry, it is fortunate that as its brand-name recognition and sales have increased, so has the quality of its biographical books. "Condoleezza Rice" is a case in point. Not only did Bluewater luck out by having its subject making headlines again regarding Afghanistan around the time the book hit shelves, but the company also was fortunate to have chosen writer Chris Ward to chronicle the life story of our first female African-American secretary of state.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Charlotte Salomon's Life? or Theater?, a cycle of 769 watercolors painted from 1940 to 1942, opens with an image of suicide by drowning and closes with a self-portrait of the artist gazing out to sea. Salomon, who would die at Auschwitz in 1943, was the only female in her immediate family who did not take her own life. This makes her magnum opus - an intensive exploration of suicide, lies, life and love - not a tragedy, but a triumph. Hers is a heroic story of how self-knowledge leads to self-preservation, richer than most sagas of salvation through art, more eloquent than most accounts of resurrection after the Holocaust.
NEWS
December 18, 2001 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a story of the good that can come from bad, and the jury sat spellbound as defense lawyer Tariq El-Shabazz wove the tale as only he could. He told of a teenager from New York City's projects who was caught in a minor crime. Part of the punishment was time with Scared Straight, a program started in the 1970s to expose wayward juveniles to inmates and the brutalities of prison life. That experience changed the youngster, El-Shabazz said. He won scholarships to college, then law school.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1998 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The life of Sojourner Truth, the 19th-century abolitionist born into slavery as Isabella Baumfree, would seem to yield dramatic material enough for several plays - which makes it especially disappointing that half a play is the best that Sojourner, the one-woman show on view at the Bushfire Theatre of Performing Arts, can muster. It's a reasonably absorbing half a play, however. In the anteroom of a New York City auditorium, playwright Richard LaMonte Pierce introduces his heroine at age 86, preparing to deliver what would be the final lecture of her life.
NEWS
March 11, 2010 | By Derrick Nunnally, Kathleen Brady Shea, and Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
She married young and badly. She bounced checks at Pizza Hut and the grocery. She hit the bottle to excess sometimes, talked to her cats, and once attempted suicide. And, as "JihadJane," she spewed violent-sounding vitriol online for all the world - including law enforcement - to see. From what's known about her so far, Colleen Renee LaRose is not coming off as the sharpest jihadist in the suburbs. The life of the Pennsburg woman who is due in federal court a week from today on terrorism charges is sounding ever more sad than scary.
NEWS
March 13, 1991 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributors to this report include the Associated Press, the New York Post, USA Today and Inquirer staff member Steven Rea
Marlon Brando, having long resisted enticements to write his autobiography, has agreed to do it for Random House, it was reported yesterday. No terms were disclosed, but the New York Times said the actor would get seven figures for delivering his life story in two years. The news comes two weeks after Brando's son, Christian, got a 10-year stretch for killing his half-sister's boyfriend. Brando "reached a point in his life when there was something he wanted to say," said his agent, George England, "a point where a number of things had distilled and coalesced.
NEWS
July 3, 1991
Now comes Clarence Thomas, 43, black and once-poor, to try to fill - if President Bush gets his way - the big shoes being left by retiring Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. His story - The Clarence Thomas Life Story - was made much of by the President in introducing the Yale Law School graduate and year-long member of the appellate bench at a Kennebunkport news conference. He is conservative America's success story writ large: born in the hardscrabble outskirts of Savannah, Ga., raised by a blunt grandfather who despised welfare idlers, a hard worker, disciplined student, self-sufficient.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 14, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Groce didn't know she had a great-uncle who could be worthy of history books until she opened an old cardboard box. The 63-year-old was rifling through family memorabilia with a relative when she came across the photo of a handsome, crisply dressed man gripping the steering wheel in a cockpit. "That's Uncle Emory?" she said, stunned, to her cousin Aileen Ryan. "He's black. " Groce looks anything but. As she dug deeper, Groce found the outline of a life that had been hidden from her family for a generation.
NEWS
August 30, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saadiya Ali, Erica Tuttle, and Nancy Manion could not say goodbye. When they reached the screen door of Manion's neat little Bensalem house, they hesitated on the threshold, hugging one another, promising to stay in touch, fighting back tears. The three women had met only in mid-July. They had spoken only a half-dozen times. And Manion had done most of the talking. But in those six weeks, they had given one another the kind of comfort, kindness, and enlightenment that some friends - and many relatives - never achieve in a lifetime.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writers
NEW YORK - In a moving ceremony that was also filled with laughter, Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg's family and colleagues recalled him Wednesday as a feisty and determined man whose life story shaped his work - and also described a personal side rarely seen in public. Lautenberg's funeral on the Upper East Side drew 41 senators, six members of Congress, Gov. Christie, and former Govs. Jon S. Corzine, Jim McGreevey, and James J. Florio. Vice President Biden, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, and New Jersey Sen. Robert Menendez delivered eulogies.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
'I been through it all," Charles Bradley says in the rugged, scarred voice that comes so forcefully to life on Victim of Love , his second album on the Daptone label. The raspy-as-he-wants-to-be 66-year-old soul man was just waking up Wednesday in his one-bedroom apartment in Brooklyn. He had a brief break in a tour that is scheduled to find him headlining the Apollo Theater in Harlem before coming to Philadelphia on Friday night to play at Union Transfer with his band, the Extraordinaires.
NEWS
March 18, 2013 | By Mike Baker, Associated Press
OLYMPIA, Wash. - Behind his sunglasses, Rep. Cyrus Habib is trying to remember the name of a fully blind politician who came before him. This was someone who served many years ago, Habib recalls. In the U.S. Senate. The grandfather of writer Gore Vidal. Habib rattles off a few details before surrendering: "Let me look him up. " Turning to a laptop that provides him constant audio feedback, Habib needs just 23 seconds to launch his Internet browser, run a query, and find the information - a biographical overview of former Oklahoma Sen. Thomas Gore.
NEWS
February 25, 2013 | By Jay Reeves, Associated Press
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Eric Rudolph, serving a life sentence for bombings that killed two people in Alabama and Georgia in the 1990s, has published his autobiography from prison with the help of his brother. The book - Between the Lines of Drift: The Memoirs of a Militant - is hardly a best-seller: It ranked No. 24,040 in sales Friday at a website that allows authors to publish their own works. But the government said it still would seize any profits from sales, no matter the amount.
NEWS
January 27, 2013
The made-up stories of the next five months are passionate, often international, sometimes (or are they?) occult. The short novel and short story are coming on strong again. Biography, autobiography, and history loom large, as always, among nonfiction titles. Butterflies and the Bible make an appearance, too. Plenty to keep a reader busy, from here to the summer solstice and beyond. - By John Timpane and Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer staff writers Butterflies, the Bible, passionate fiction - the books of spring Fiction The River Swimmer: Novellas by Jim Harrison (Grove, $25, Jan. 8)
NEWS
December 19, 2012 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Privately, Ramona DiGiacomo Johnstone of Woodbury struggled to cope with her only son's murder, speaking about him sometimes in the present tense. But publicly, the gregarious, 4-foot-11 woman would chat up strangers and get to know them quickly. "She could empathize with people," said her brother-in-law Charles DePaulis. "She knew your life story in 10 minutes. " Five years after her 27-year-old son, Thomas Lennox III, a Delaware County businessman, was fatally beaten in Pennsylvania, Johnstone, 54, was fatally stabbed Monday in her apartment.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2012
Theater 1812 Productions: Boston Marriage David Mamet comedy about 2 women whose romantic entanglements lead to trouble. Closes 5/20. Plays & Players Theatre, 1714 Delancey St.; 215-592-9560. www.1812productions.org . $20-$36. A Funny Thing Happened on the Way ot the Forum A slave in ancient Rome tries to win a beautiful courtesan's hand for his master. Closes 5/19. Ritz Theatre Company, 915 White Horse Pike, Oaklyn; 856-858-5230. $25-$35. A Grand Night for Singing Tribute to the composing team of Rodgers & Hammerstein.
NEWS
January 16, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The first thing anybody needs to know about Ludwig Live! is that the cabaret show, playing at the Kimmel Center's Innovation Studio, has little to do with Beethoven or even having laughs at his expense. Using tired devices such as the clash of high and low art, Ludwig Live! , which opened Friday, explores how intentionally ramshackle showbiz somehow holds the stage. The concept is that cranky old Beethoven - played by Charles Lindberg, in the cheapest wig imaginable - is somehow back from the dead and taking his story on the road with a troupe of actors.
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