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Life Story

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2009 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Going by its title, you might think Rock Prophecies had something to do with Nostradamus' predicting the rise of the Jonas Brothers, or some similarly uncanny feat of seeing into the musical, or geological, future. That's not the case. Instead, the poorly chosen title of John Chester's documentary about Robert Knight is meant to imply that the music photographer's ability to home in on young talent destined for greatness qualifies him as some sort of rock prophet. Which is a reach, to put it mildly.
NEWS
March 18, 2013 | By Mike Baker, Associated Press
OLYMPIA, Wash. - Behind his sunglasses, Rep. Cyrus Habib is trying to remember the name of a fully blind politician who came before him. This was someone who served many years ago, Habib recalls. In the U.S. Senate. The grandfather of writer Gore Vidal. Habib rattles off a few details before surrendering: "Let me look him up. " Turning to a laptop that provides him constant audio feedback, Habib needs just 23 seconds to launch his Internet browser, run a query, and find the information - a biographical overview of former Oklahoma Sen. Thomas Gore.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2009 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
With Bluewater Comics quickly gaining a reputation as the Biography Channel of the comics industry, it is fortunate that as its brand-name recognition and sales have increased, so has the quality of its biographical books. "Condoleezza Rice" is a case in point. Not only did Bluewater luck out by having its subject making headlines again regarding Afghanistan around the time the book hit shelves, but the company also was fortunate to have chosen writer Chris Ward to chronicle the life story of our first female African-American secretary of state.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Charlotte Salomon's Life? or Theater?, a cycle of 769 watercolors painted from 1940 to 1942, opens with an image of suicide by drowning and closes with a self-portrait of the artist gazing out to sea. Salomon, who would die at Auschwitz in 1943, was the only female in her immediate family who did not take her own life. This makes her magnum opus - an intensive exploration of suicide, lies, life and love - not a tragedy, but a triumph. Hers is a heroic story of how self-knowledge leads to self-preservation, richer than most sagas of salvation through art, more eloquent than most accounts of resurrection after the Holocaust.
NEWS
December 18, 2001 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a story of the good that can come from bad, and the jury sat spellbound as defense lawyer Tariq El-Shabazz wove the tale as only he could. He told of a teenager from New York City's projects who was caught in a minor crime. Part of the punishment was time with Scared Straight, a program started in the 1970s to expose wayward juveniles to inmates and the brutalities of prison life. That experience changed the youngster, El-Shabazz said. He won scholarships to college, then law school.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1998 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The life of Sojourner Truth, the 19th-century abolitionist born into slavery as Isabella Baumfree, would seem to yield dramatic material enough for several plays - which makes it especially disappointing that half a play is the best that Sojourner, the one-woman show on view at the Bushfire Theatre of Performing Arts, can muster. It's a reasonably absorbing half a play, however. In the anteroom of a New York City auditorium, playwright Richard LaMonte Pierce introduces his heroine at age 86, preparing to deliver what would be the final lecture of her life.
NEWS
March 11, 2010 | By Derrick Nunnally, Kathleen Brady Shea, and Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
She married young and badly. She bounced checks at Pizza Hut and the grocery. She hit the bottle to excess sometimes, talked to her cats, and once attempted suicide. And, as "JihadJane," she spewed violent-sounding vitriol online for all the world - including law enforcement - to see. From what's known about her so far, Colleen Renee LaRose is not coming off as the sharpest jihadist in the suburbs. The life of the Pennsburg woman who is due in federal court a week from today on terrorism charges is sounding ever more sad than scary.
NEWS
March 13, 1991 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributors to this report include the Associated Press, the New York Post, USA Today and Inquirer staff member Steven Rea
Marlon Brando, having long resisted enticements to write his autobiography, has agreed to do it for Random House, it was reported yesterday. No terms were disclosed, but the New York Times said the actor would get seven figures for delivering his life story in two years. The news comes two weeks after Brando's son, Christian, got a 10-year stretch for killing his half-sister's boyfriend. Brando "reached a point in his life when there was something he wanted to say," said his agent, George England, "a point where a number of things had distilled and coalesced.
NEWS
July 3, 1991
Now comes Clarence Thomas, 43, black and once-poor, to try to fill - if President Bush gets his way - the big shoes being left by retiring Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. His story - The Clarence Thomas Life Story - was made much of by the President in introducing the Yale Law School graduate and year-long member of the appellate bench at a Kennebunkport news conference. He is conservative America's success story writ large: born in the hardscrabble outskirts of Savannah, Ga., raised by a blunt grandfather who despised welfare idlers, a hard worker, disciplined student, self-sufficient.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 17, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Columnist
Only the jurors know for sure what went on during the two hours they deliberated the federal case of Ori Feibush vs. Kenyatta Johnson last week. But, having witnessed much of the court case, I'm willing to bet they came away thinking Feibush and Johnson may well deserve each other. Feibush, a developer in the Point Breeze neighborhood, came out on top. The jury awarded him $34,000 for his claim that Johnson, a City Councilman for that area, had stymied his efforts in 2013 to buy city-owned land.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
I'm not sure what's more wonderful (and strange): the story told in the British comedy The Lady in the Van or that it's based on fact. Adapted from the 1999 play by renowned author and screenwriter Alan Bennett ( The History Boys ) and starring Maggie Smith, who originated the role on stage, it's about a homeless woman who lived for more than 15 years in a van parked in the writer's driveway. Seems she got permission from Bennett to park it for a few hours in the 1970s, but then decided to stay.
NEWS
April 9, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Rebecca Barnard was in the early stages of dementia when her husband, a fellow software developer with a Ph.D. in philosophy, dragged her to a philosophy conference in Baltimore. They heard a young philosopher muse about ethical questions that arise late in dementia. Should the wishes a patient had when her brain was working properly be honored "after she ceases to be a person?" the speaker asked. Beck, as Barnard was known, turned to her husband and whispered, "She doesn't know what she's talking about.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Sayed Kashua's life story reminds one of that wonderfully inappropriate line from Steve Martin's 1979 classic, The Jerk . "It was never easy for me," Martin says, forcing each syllable with the slow, careful deliberation of the addled. "I was born a poor black child. " Kashua was born a (somewhat poor) Palestinian child in Tira, a small, predominantly Arab town 20 miles north of Tel Aviv. But he grew up to become one of the most celebrated satirists in Hebrew literature. You heard right: The novelist and screenwriter writes passionately about the daily injustices faced by Israel's Arabs, yet he writes exclusively in Hebrew.
NEWS
December 18, 2015 | Jenice Armstrong, Daily News
I've been wracking my brain for the past couple of days trying to think of what to ask Dr. Ruth Westheimer when she's back in Philadelphia on Monday. She'll be at the Walnut Street Theatre's production based on her life called, "Becoming Dr. Ruth. " The play, which continues through Dec. 27, tells her inspiring life story of fleeing Nazi Germany as a youngster and decades later emigrating to America and becoming the nation's leading sex expert. Following the sold-out performance, yours truly will have the once-in-a-lifetime chance to interview Westheimer on stage.
NEWS
October 21, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Langhorne native Jesse Vile brings a very Philadelphia story to ESPN's excellent 30 for 30 documentary series when Prince of Pennsylvania premieres at 9 p.m. Tuesday. The film also screens as part of the Philadelphia Film Festival on Saturday and Nov. 1. Prince chronicles millionaire John du Pont's murder of Olympic wrestler David Schultz. The story is predominantly told through the voices of those who lived and trained with du Pont and Schultz at Foxcatcher Farms in Newtown Square, including David's brother Mark.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It wasn't Charlie Gracie's idea that he write his life story. The South Philadelphia native was one of the first stars of rock and roll, one who inspired numerous future superstars. But his life has contained not even a hint of the scandal and salaciousness that usually draw publishers to rock memoirs. "Why would you want to write about me?" the still-vibrant 78-year-old singer and guitarist says at the home in Drexel Hill he shares with his wife of 57 years, Joan. "I don't have anything spectacular outside of my music.
NEWS
February 16, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Before Twitter used brevity to speak volumes, SMITH Magazine launched what became a mini-phenomenon called the Six-Word Memoir. Old mixtapes foreshadowing my postmodern troubles . And before popularizing haiku-like autobiographical writing as fun for the entire family, magazine founder Larry Smith was the student council president at Moorestown High School. "I was cursed with a happy childhood," says Smith, a 1987 MHS grad who remains friendly with several of his teachers and often visits his parents in the Moorestown home where he grew up. Smith now lives in Columbus, Ohio, where his wife, writer Piper Kerman ( Orange Is the New Black )
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
At one point during his fraud trial last week, Don Tollefson wanted to testify about a Skittles-eating contest. The prosecutor objected. The judge sent the jury out of the courtroom. For nearly an hour, the former sportscaster delved into yet another tale about his charity for poor children. Tollefson, who is serving as his own attorney, told a story to the judge that involved kids from his charity catching Skittles in their mouths. Out of nowhere, Tollefson said, one boy spoke a few words and expressed a desire to play professional hockey some day. "It's one of the moments I'll cherish for the rest of my life," he said.
NEWS
November 25, 2014
AS SOMEONE who grew up in Washington, D.C., I was one of those folks who jokingly called former Mayor Marion Barry Jr. "Mayor for Life.' Sometimes I said it with admiration. Other times with disgust. There were times when I said it with sheer embarrassment. Today, I call him "Mayor for Life" with sadness. News that Barry had died early yesterday at the age of 78 hit me as if he'd been a long-lost relative. I had just seen a photo of Barry on a friend's Facebook page and noticed that Barry looked feeble, grandfatherly even, as he held the hand of the D.C.'s new mayor-elect Muriel Bowser.
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