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Lifeline

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NEWS
December 21, 2008
President Bush's bailout of General Motors and Chrysler prevents an economic calamity, for now, and dumps the responsibility on his successor to enforce the vague terms. In agreeing to lend the automakers $17.4 billion, Bush really had no options. GM and Chrysler would have run out of money by the end of the month, a failure that could have resulted in the loss of up to three million middle-class jobs next year. On top of the two million jobs lost this year, such a blow would have deepened a recession that is already the worst in a quarter-century.
NEWS
December 25, 2006 | By Manasee Wagh INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To examine the use and impact of health resources on the Web, researchers in Wisconsin created a whole new site. Although their study is ongoing, one finding is clear: the discussion boards are the best-used section. The Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System provides interactive education - message boards, detailed medical information, decision-making tools - for patients and their families. It began in 1987 as a long-term controlled study of how consumers use computers for health care; Internet access to the program was added later and quickly became dominant.
NEWS
October 13, 1995
Money is tight; jobs scarce; disposable income more limited than usual. These are hard times, but they'll get harder yet. The outlook for nonprofit organizations is bleak. Because in hard times, people contribute less. That, of course, is when more and more people need the help of social welfare agencies. Meanwhile, the new Masters of the Universe in Washington are slicing funds or passing on to the states responsibilities that used to be federal - responsibilities most states are unable or unwilling to shoulder.
NEWS
December 27, 2004
GOV. Rendell, back against the wall, against all odds, stuck between a rock and a hard place, - oh, you provide the cliche - has scraped together $18.8 million to temporarily fund Pennsylvania's 40 struggling public transit systems, including $13.3 million for SEPTA. For years, SEPTA has suffered from a chronic condition: lack of dedicated funding. And Harrisburg, in its political pettiness, has treated the disease with Band-Aids and aspirin when more aggressive treatment was warranted.
NEWS
May 1, 1986 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
A Philadelphia-area legislator has proposed a measure requiring local telephone companies to provide basic service at reduced costs to low-income consumers. The "lifeline" telephone bill was filed by state Sen. Clarence Bell (R., Delaware) and was one of several utility-related proposals submitted recently by the senator. According to a Bell aide, the lifeline bill would require that basic telephone service be provided to all consumers in a company's service area. The low-cost service would be available to any consumer whose annual income did not exceed 150 percent of the poverty level as set periodically by the federal government.
NEWS
March 2, 1986 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Contrasted with the austerity of the rest of Angelina Carnivale's outfit, the pendant on a golden chain around her neck looked positively ostentatious. But the pendant was there to protect her life, not feed any love of luxury. The locket contained a button that Carnivale, 74, newly widowed and a victim of three minor strokes, could push to summon help to her home in Burlington Township. The low-power radio signal that it sends activates a telephone unit in Carnivale's bedroom that is linked by a telephone connection to the emergency room of Zurbrugg Memorial Hospital's Riverside Division, three miles away.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Every time Durick Hayden picked up the phone to make a long-distance call, he regretted it. Not because of the cost. The problem for Hayden, an evangelical Christian living in Tupelo, Miss., was that his carrier, AT&T, supported homosexual rights and television programming he found offensive. So he switched. Not to MCI or Sprint or another major company, but to a small firm that promised to donate a part of Hayden's long-distance bill to conservative religious organizations that shared his views.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
Ted Leydon does not wear a turban or long flowing robes, and he is quick to admit that he cannot predict how long someone will live. He also cannot say if or when Mr. or Ms. Right will come along. But the Romanian-born palm reader is pretty good at telling folks if they look like their grandfather or mother, are easygoing or hot-tempered, optimistic or pessimistic. In a palmistry workshop in Phoenixville on Friday night, Leydon also was able to correctly tell Susan Davidson-Fisher that her blood type is Rh negative.
NEWS
December 5, 1994 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
According to gangsta rappers Public Enemy, 911 is "a joke. " According to the occasionally descriptive language of the 1987 Philadelphia Police Study Task Force, 911 is a "tyrannical burden. " Either way you look at it, 911 - the police emergency telephone line - has become the subject of ridicule since its inception in the mid-1960s. The emergency system was proposed by a presidential commission on law enforcement in 1967 as a "universal signal for help. " It was installed in Philadelphia in March 1974.
NEWS
March 22, 2003 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Low-income New Jersey residents will get help paying natural gas and electric bills under a program approved this week by the state Board of Public Utilities. The revised Universal Service Fund, approved by the board on Thursday, replaces a pilot program in place for the past year for households that qualified under a formula related to federal poverty guidelines. The fund will pay as much as $1,800, compared to $200 in the pilot program. "One of the board's primary responsibilities is to protect ratepayers and to ensure there are programs and services that assist our most vulnerable citizens," the board's president, Jeanne M. Fox, said in a statement that announced the plan.
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NEWS
January 27, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
ON JULY 14, 2013, William Kenneth Wise Jr., 42, had just left his girlfriend's house and was walking down 27th Street near Silver in North Philadelphia, when someone fatally shot him in the head. The shooter, who hasn't been caught, ruined more than one life. "It still feels like it just happened yesterday," Wise's mother, Ed'na Drakeford of West Oak Lane, said recently. "To lose someone that close to you is like losing part of your body. "I couldn't eat," she said. "I couldn't sleep.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is a pension crisis eating your state or city budget? Life insurers want to help. But can taxpayers afford their cure? General Motors and Verizon have each pumped a mountain of cash into life-insurance companies that promised lifetime payouts to salaried retirees, freeing future corporate profits for business and shareholders. John Hausladen , of Plan Funding Solutions L.L.C. , of Malvern, has been meeting with officials in Harrisburg, trying to get them to consider a similar move for the underfunded Pennsylvania State Employees' Retirement System and Public School Employees' Retirement System.
NEWS
March 24, 2013 | By Karie Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
Melanie Miller used to love walking from her home on Spruce Street to Rittenhouse Square - until 2008, when she became chronically ill, disabled, and in constant pain. Miller that year was diagnosed with a litany of problems, including multiple sclerosis and transverse myelitis, a spinal cord disorder. "It's in my joints, it's in my bones, it's in my brain," said Miller, 37. If she was going to stay at her beloved home, she needed help. So she joined Penn's Village, an organization of Center City residents who work to support elderly, ill or special-needs neighbors who want to remain in their homes.
SPORTS
October 26, 2012 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doug Collins is sending a message loud and clear to his team. The 76ers coach doesn't want the players to use injuries as an excuse, even if it is their big-ticket item who is hurting. Collins uses the old mantra that he will prepare with the players who are available. One of the players not at his disposal is Andrew Bynum. While Wednesday was targeted as Bynum's first day to practice with his new team, Sixers general manager Tony DiLeo said the center would not participate until he is pain-free in his right knee.
NEWS
September 29, 2012 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
Sallie Mae may be a low-interest kind of gal, but she's nothing if not persistent. And she wants her money every month. If you're the loan-poor parent of a college student, you know what I'm talking about. College tuition has skyrocketed since 1985 and become downright unaffordable for most American households, whether they belong to the 47 percent or not. For families in the lowest income group, college is the second-largest expense, pricing out plenty of would-be students - you know, the ones Mitt Romney claims don't take responsibility for their own lives.
NEWS
September 9, 2012
Is this justice? Taxpayers bailed the banks out of reckless gambles while millions of families got squeezed out of their homes. Programs to turn back the waves of foreclosures were poorly thought out and administered. New Jersey, which the Mortgage Bankers Association says has the second highest percentage of homes in foreclosure, was no exception. Thousands of New Jersey homeowners were robbed of their ability to participate in the state's struggling economy because a $300 million federal forgivable loan pool was left mostly untapped.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2012 | By Christina Rexrode, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Knight Capital Group, the trading firm responsible for last week's stock market mayhem, avoided collapse by lining up a $400 million lifeline from a group of other Wall Street companies Monday morning. But the money comes at a steep price. Knight says it will get the cash infusion from an investor group led by Jefferies Group, as well as Blackstone, Getco, Stephens, Stifel Nicolaus and TD Ameritrade. In exchange, the group will receive stock that can be converted to a 73 percent stake in Knight, which means Knight is essentially handing over control to the investor group.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The volunteers spend their days faxing, calling, copying, talking with people across a desk, filling out complex forms to get drug companies to give free medicines to people who cannot afford them. It may not sound like the most exciting volunteer work in Philadelphia, but this award-winning project does have an impact. Besides helping patients get lifesaving medicines, it saves the city about $2 million a year. A one-month supply of some drugs can cost from $300 to $500, so some patients "would have no other choice except to not take these medications and would have all the complications from their disease, and they would die from it eventually," said Yelena Galkin, an internal-medicine doctor who is clinical director of city Health Center 10 in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 8, 2011 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
This week, Israel and Turkey missed a critical chance to repair their frayed relations. Their mistake - in rejecting a promising diplomatic opening - has jolted an already-unstable region. It will also prove costly for both countries. Yet politicians in Jerusalem and Ankara failed to grasp this outstretched lifeline - indeed, tossed it away. The lifeline was held out by the United Nations' Palmer Commission, which just released a long-delayed report about Israel's raid on the Turkish aid ship Mavi Marmara.
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