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NEWS
October 1, 2002
In reference to the criticism by state Transportation Commissioner James Fox ("Transit chief says he tried to kill light rail," Sept. 25), it was due to political pressure from towns such as Merchantville that the South Jersey light-rail line was routed around and not through populated areas. The idea that someone might actually want to walk to the train never came into play. The 409 bus is routed so that it takes almost two hours to get to Trenton from Pennsauken. They should have buses run through the light-rail stops after 10 p.m. to avoid the obvious lack-of-service problems.
NEWS
March 18, 2010 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A waterfront rail line in Philadelphia moved closer to reality yesterday as the Delaware River Port Authority approved a $6.5 million contract for environmental studies and preliminary design. The work, expected to take about two years, is to prepare the way for a proposed $500 million light-rail line in the middle of Columbus Boulevard between Pier 70 and Girard Avenue. The line, which could be operated by SEPTA or PATCO, would be designed to improve transportation and spur development on the Philadelphia waterfront.
NEWS
February 3, 1998 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a surprise move, the Township Committee last night voted, 2-1, to rescind its opposition to the proposed commuter light-rail line less than a month after a survey of town voters showed that a majority opposed the project. "I think the committee should take a neutral position on light rail," Committeeman Victor Vittorino said. ". . . Our role should be to facilitate information. " Rail opponent Len Candy, who convinced the committee in November to conduct the survey, expressed disbelief.
NEWS
August 10, 1993 | By Nancy Lawson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Down the middle of State Street in Media ambles a big vehicle, stopping at every block, towering over Toyotas and Chevrolets on either side and picking up passengers near Borough Hall and the vintage 1938 Media Hardware store. It's not quite a trolley, not quite a train car, and definitely not a bus. It's a light-rail car, a modern version of the trolley that looks like a mixed breed of all three. And even with its contemporary surroundings, the aura around the Route 101 light-rail tracks on State Street is reminiscent of those days when the hardware store first sprang to life - and when trolleys still looked like trolleys.
NEWS
February 15, 1997
Ever have a billion-dollar present you wanted to give somebody, only to have him shout, "Go away?" No? Then it may take some explaining to convey what Frank Russo's been going through for the last 15 months in South Jersey. Mr. Russo is in charge of building things for NJ Transit. And NJ Transit had wanted to spend something like $1 billion on new light-rail lines running from Trenton to Camden, and eventually on to Glassboro. Unfortunately, not-in-my-backyard foes of the lines have won the ear of Camden and Gloucester County politicians, so the Camden-Glassboro line is pretty much on the shelf.
NEWS
May 11, 2000
Earlier this year, Camden's ship came in. Now a train is headed to town. Gov. Whitman hopped aboard a backhoe Monday not far from where the USS New Jersey will be docked to initiate construction of the long-awaited, hotly debated Southern New Jersey Light-Rail Transit System. With a $604 million price tag, it's the largest public transit investment ever in South Jersey. When it opens in 2003, the 34-mile line will carry an estimated 4,500 commuters a day. Besides giving a needed boost to the cities on each end, this line is essential to promising plans to revive the moribund Route 130 corridor in Burlington County.
NEWS
August 2, 2002 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The project to connect Camden and Trenton via light rail - already three months behind schedule - has hit another obstacle with the builders suing the state this week for more than $100 million for additional costs. Southern New Jersey Rail Group L.L.C., a consortium of international companies selected to construct the 34-mile line, filed the lawsuit Wednesday in Newark. "We take this action reluctantly, and we don't take it lightly," Howard Menaker, a spokesman for Bechtel Infrastructure, one of the principal companies, said yesterday.
NEWS
August 1, 2000 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
"Doors are closing," says a friendly female voice. "Welcome aboard," it continues. "Eating, smoking and use of foul language is prohibited. Thank you for choosing MetroLink. " That MetroLink is so polite. MetroLink is a 7-year-old, 171/2-mile-long light rail system in St. Louis that has a lot in common with "The Little Engine That Could. " Dissed and dismissed when first proposed, MetroLink - like the storybook train - has proved it can do everything it sets out to do. It attracts 40,000 passengers a day, 10,000 more than projected.
NEWS
August 30, 1997 | By Diane Saville
I am dismayed by all the recent misinformation concerning light rail, misinformation from various newspapers and from Citizens for Alternative Rail (CFAR), the Gloucester County group that so far has blocked a planned light-rail line along the River Road Conrail Corridor through that county. Examples of these falsehoods follow, countered by the truth. Falsehood: This train is going to bring undesirables who will pillage our small towns. It will lower our property values and damage our business communities.
NEWS
April 9, 2001 | By Lauren Mayk INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Those who thought light rail would never happen in South Jersey are being proved wrong by torn-up streets in Camden and the commotion around a bridge lying on its side at the edge of the Rancocas Creek. More than 350 workers dot the rail lines from Camden to Trenton, repairing and replacing 34 miles of track that will be shared by Conrail and passengers on the Southern New Jersey Light Rail Transit System. Twenty-five bridges - 17 of them over water - will also be rehabbed or replaced, including the historic Rancocas Creek bridge.
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NEWS
October 9, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposed $1.6 billion light-rail line between Glassboro and Camden has hit a significant roadblock: The Federal Transit Administration will not proceed with a required environmental study because the planned rail line has no owner or operator. Without a completed environmental study, the 18-mile line cannot be built. "Unfortunately, because you have not identified a project sponsor who can accept the responsibility for commitments in the environmental impact statement, and ultimately operate and construct the project, we cannot move ahead with the environmental document," the FTA's regional administrator in Philadelphia, Brigid Hynes-Cherin, wrote to John Hanson, chief executive of the Delaware River Port Authority.
NEWS
July 19, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A report on a proposed $1.6 billion South Jersey light-rail line has been delayed by extended studies of historical resources and threatened and endangered species along the planned route. The proposed 18-mile-long Glassboro-Camden Line would restore passenger service to a corridor now used only by freight trains. A "draft environmental impact statement" on the effects of construction and operation of the rail line was supposed to be published in June, as a required step in the process of getting federal and state approvals for building it. The $8.1 million environmental assessment is to examine effects of noise and vibration, air pollution, social and economic changes, and historic-preservation efforts.
NEWS
November 21, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
PITMAN A proposed $1.6 billion South Jersey light-rail line drew scores of area residents to Pitman on Tuesday evening to review the plans for possible operation by 2019. Another similar "open house" meeting is scheduled for Camden on Thursday as planners explain where the 18-mile route would go and what information they are gathering for their environmental-impact statement. The long-discussed rail line would restore passenger service to a corridor now used only for freight trains and run between Glassboro and Camden, with 14 stops.
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
One man who traveled on the River Line twice shoplifted cans of Red Bull from a convenience store in Palmyra and used the light-rail line for getaways. Others have been arrested for offenses such as disorderly conduct and trespassing. To stem such quality-of-life crimes committed in the river towns in Burlington County served by the eight-year-old line, NJ Transit police and officers from 10 towns have joined forces to patrol platforms and trains. The task force has been in operation since September.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
By Frank Kummer With the exception of New Jersey Transit, most local mass transit systems are beginning to run smoothly after days of shut-downs and delays from Sandy. SEPTA ( www.septa.org ) is up and running, as is its regional rail line. The Trenton Line trains, which saw significant delays this morning, are running on or close to schedule. Riders on the Lansdale/Doylestown Line should till expect delays of up to 15 minutes due to signal problems - but that's down significantly.
NEWS
March 1, 2012
A Westville woman pleaded guilty Wednesday to assaulting her boyfriend in November on a New Jersey Transit light rail train in Camden. Lisa Alyounes, 26, will be sentenced April 27 for aggravated assault and resisting arrest. Alyounes admitted she pushed her boyfriend from a platform onto the tracks while a train was approaching a station on New Jersey Transit's Riverline light rail in Camden. He was not injured, and the two boarded the train. Alyounes then beat the victim in the rail car as another passenger recorded the assault, authorities said.
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a two-year delay, a study of a proposed commuter rail line between Glassboro and Camden is moving again - with the same contractor and about the same price tag as before. A committee of the Delaware River Port Authority board today approved an $8.2 million contract for an environmental impact study of the proposed 18-mile light-rail line. If approved by the full DRPA board, the contract would be paid for by NJ Transit, although the DRPA would oversee the work. The environmental-impact study would be done by STV Inc., an engineering and architectural firm headquartered in Douglassville, Pa. It would take about two years.
NEWS
December 26, 2011 | By Michael Aubele, MCT REGIONAL NEWS
As plans to start an Allegheny Valley commuter train proceed, the developer who proposed it doesn't have any assurance he can overcome serious financing obstacles. The proposed rail line from Lower Burrell, about 20 miles northeast of downtown Pittsburgh, to the city's Strip District will need major government subsidies before it's built and after it's running. The private investor planning to finance the commuter line, whose cost has been estimated at $350 million, will have to provide money until the federal government dedicates millions in grants to the project.
NEWS
August 11, 2011 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Citing deadly accidents such as a Washington Metro crash in 2009, the Obama administration wants the authority to regulate safety on subways, trolleys, and light-rail systems. Currently, state governments and individual transit agencies are responsible for assuring that passengers on those vehicles are safe. Federal regulators have broad powers to establish and enforce safety rules on airplanes and trains, but not on other rail transit. "A coal car has more federal safety protection than someone on the Broad Street subway," said Federal Transit Administrator Peter Rogoff.
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