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Light Touch

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NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
THE VIRGIN MARY was due to appear on the night of Sept. 20, 1953.   Reappear, actually, since she had already appeared to a group of youngsters twice over the previous two days at 52nd Street and Parkside Avenue at the edge of Fairmount Park. More than 50,000 people showed up to witness the expected miracle. Among them was Henry R. Darling, a young reporter for the Evening Bulletin, who had been on the paper only a few years and had been assigned mostly to obits, 50th wedding anniversaries and a few innocuous features.
NEWS
October 6, 2002 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Charles DeFeo maintained a light touch and airiness in the watercolors and oils that lend a lot of sparkle to his current show at the Somerville Manning Gallery. This display features a talented Wilmington-born Manhattan illustrator (1892-1978) who at age 16 worked for illustrator Howard Pyle in Pyle's Wilmington studio without ever formally studying art with that master. Eventually, DeFeo overcame obstacles to become an artist, and he taught at New York's Art Students League. The display offers a lively example of someone who, as an illustrator most active from 1920 into the 1940s, came to grips with subject matter early and found the attitudes it required to cope with it in work for such magazines as Liberty, McCall's, Cosmopolitan, Redbook, Look, Life, and the children's magazine St. Nicholas.
LIVING
August 8, 2000 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Although there are those who say opera can never be cool, the mind boggles when asked to consider what would be the height of operatic uncool. One of those retro-Wagner productions with fat women in ill-fitting horned helmets? An overblown Franco Zeffirelli production of Amahl and the Night Visitors? An operetta by John Philip Sousa? Surprise: The latter entity is indeed in our midst and is the hit of the Glimmerglass Opera's summer season. The title is The Glass Blowers, and is one of Sousa's 21 stage works.
SPORTS
November 25, 1998 | By Ira Josephs, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The cross-country runners at Cardinal O'Hara know that coach Ed Adams is always looking out for them, the same way Adams' parents, Ed Sr. and Marie, looked out for him as a youth growing up in South Philadelphia. "I don't like to holler," the soft-spoken Adams said. "My father didn't holler at me. He would talk to me. My dad was a wallpaper hanger, and he did some plumbing work and laid bricks. He could do anything. He would come home from work at 9 [p.m.] and listen to me for two hours.
NEWS
October 30, 1991 | By Douglas A. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tucking their ailing fiddles under their arms, top musicians from the Philadelphia Orchestra and other national institutions come these days to a tidy bi-level on Lantern Lane in Cherry Hill. Meeting them at the front door, Wilbur E. Wamsley, in his crisp, gray smock, smiles like the parish priest and, his slippers padding down the stairs, leads the musicians to his basement, where he relieves them of their instruments, light as sparrows and delicate as crystal, sculpted hundreds of years ago from slivers of maple and wafers of spruce.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | byline w, o email
State store pick of the month Louis Jadot Bourgogne Chardonnay $13.99* PLCB Item No. 6406 White burgundy wines are the world's original chardonnays, but those grown in France are often lighter, brighter and less oaky. The Burgundy region's cool climate creates wines of delicacy and finesse that are dry and extremely food-friendly. Modestly priced examples like this one are generally given only a light touch of barrel aging, if any at all, so the purity of their orchard - fresh apple and pear flavors - shines through.
NEWS
October 24, 1987 | By Charles McCurdy, Special to the Inquirer
The members of the Philadelphia Chamber Ensemble must want to have fun when they play. Otherwise, why would they reach so far into the murky recesses of the chamber-music repertoire to find the pieces they played on last night's program at the Athenaeum of Philadelphia? And why would they jam a trio sonata by 18th-century German composer Johann Quantz back to back with a duet by late 19th-century composer Camille Saint- Saens? Again, why juxtapose a piece that relies on organic evolution for its structure (Aram Khachaturian's Trio for Clarinet, Violin and Piano)
NEWS
April 16, 1987 | By Charles McCurdy, Special to the Inquirer
British pianist Clive Swansbourne played for the first time in Philadelphia last night at the Ethical Society on Rittenhouse Square. His program was gutsy and stamped with his personality: The major piece on the program was Sir Michael Tippett's half-hour Fourth Piano Sonata. Swansbourne balanced out the program by playing a few standard pieces in the piano repertoire. The temperament of the performer was consistent. Whether playing a Rachminoff prelude or one of Schubert's Moments Musicaux, the emotional range of Swansbourne's playing was like a pool in a forest, narrowly circumscribed but of great mystery and beauty.
NEWS
April 8, 1991 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
By opening its eighth season with a concert surveying Leonard Bernstein's songs, the American Music Theater Festival has taken an early step toward finding some perspective on the composer. The concert Saturday at the Church of the Holy Trinity was the forum for the local premiere of Bernstein's final work, a cycle of songs titled Arias and Barcarolles, and songs from West Side Story, On the Town, Mass, Wonderful Town and Trouble in Tahiti. The composer's daughter, Jamie, introduced each half of the program, noting that the show songs in the second half were from Bernstein's light side.
NEWS
October 15, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
A release from the Temple University News Bureau quotes Dugald MacArthur to the effect that he is "angered by the perpetuation of dull Chekhovian performances. " He adds that Chekhov "needs a light touch, undercutting humor and an emphasis on the aliveness of the people. " The graduate production of Chekhov's "The Cherry Orchard" that last night opened the 20th anniversary season of Temple University Theater succeeds in living up to director MacArthur's fondest desires - up to a point.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | byline w, o email
State store pick of the month Louis Jadot Bourgogne Chardonnay $13.99* PLCB Item No. 6406 White burgundy wines are the world's original chardonnays, but those grown in France are often lighter, brighter and less oaky. The Burgundy region's cool climate creates wines of delicacy and finesse that are dry and extremely food-friendly. Modestly priced examples like this one are generally given only a light touch of barrel aging, if any at all, so the purity of their orchard - fresh apple and pear flavors - shines through.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By John F. Morrison, Daily News Staff Writer
  The Virgin Mary was due to appear on the night of Sept. 20, 1953. Reappear, actually, as she had already appeared to a group of youngsters twice in two days at 52d Street and Parkside Avenue at the edge of Fairmount Park. More than 50,000 came to see the expected miracle. Among them was Henry R. Darling, a young reporter for the Evening Bulletin, who had been on the paper only a few years and had been assigned obituaries, 50th anniversaries, and innocuous features.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
THE VIRGIN MARY was due to appear on the night of Sept. 20, 1953.   Reappear, actually, since she had already appeared to a group of youngsters twice over the previous two days at 52nd Street and Parkside Avenue at the edge of Fairmount Park. More than 50,000 people showed up to witness the expected miracle. Among them was Henry R. Darling, a young reporter for the Evening Bulletin, who had been on the paper only a few years and had been assigned mostly to obits, 50th wedding anniversaries and a few innocuous features.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2011 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
Summer TV's not the old song and dance anymore. It's the new song and dance, with NBC's America's Got Talent and Fox's So You Think You Can Dance (both premiered in May) leading the charge of reality shows. They'll try to marry people off (The Bachelorette is back) or stick them in a box until they blow the roof off (Big Brother premieres July 7). And enough freaks and fakes, not to mention chefs with their fryers and fricassees, will fill the tube to give everyone a huge tummy ache.
NEWS
May 1, 2011
Pop Helplessness Blues (SubPop . ) The beardy harmonizing in vogue in indie rock is epitomized by Fleet Foxes, the suburban Seattle quintet that froze listeners in their tracks with "White Winter Hymnal," the reverb- drenched, bucolic Beach Boys highlight of the band's 2008 self-titled debut. With Helplessness Blues , the Robin Pecknold-led band makes music that's staggeringly pretty. Check out the swooning "Lorelai," and just try to resist. It's almost entirely without anything resembling an edge, unless you count the skronky free-jazz sax solo that takes the eight-minute "The Shrine/An Argument" by surprise.
NEWS
September 11, 2010
An interception machine and three-time Pro Bowler derided for his light touch, coaches say Samuel has gotten stronger and more committed to tackling. This feisty and fast corner paired with Samuel in New England and is back from neck surgery with something to prove. He will also return kicks. Smooth and calm, he appears wise beyond his years and has a way of finding the football. We need to see more of his hitting. The dean of the Eagles defense says he is focused on his on-the-field play instead of forcing himself into a leadership role.
SPORTS
January 15, 2009
DONOVAN McNABB has done this before, happy and joking on the eve of the NFC Championship Game. It was true in 2002 and it was true in 2005 and it is true in 2009. It is not all that predictive about how things will turn out. He will play well or not, and the Eagles will win the game or not, and it will not be about demeanor. It will not be about smiling through a bad moment or picking up a sideline telephone or jokes on the Wednesday before. We're all past that at this point, right?
LIVING
October 8, 2008 | By Amy Z. Quinn FOR THE INQUIRER
In this season of election-related nonsense, know one thing: Bernard Brown is a vegan, but he's not campaigning to turn you into one. The founder of the PB&J Campaign doesn't care if you sprinkle cheese on your pasta, or if you like a schmear of mayo on that veggie wrap; his efforts are not part of some animal lover's plan to rid the world of meat products. Brown asks only that you think about the meal you're about to eat, and the very long tail your very quick lunch hour can have.
SPORTS
August 25, 2008 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He wasn't the gold-medal game's top performer, or the emotional leader for Team USA, but the signature Olympic basketball moment belonged to the Olympian most of China craved to see. It was a three-pointer by Kobe Bryant - no, a four-pointer, after the referee added to the moment, signaling a foul. As the shot fell, Bryant stood tall and coolly held an index finger to his lips, signaling for quiet. The crowd loved it, ignoring Bryant's order, screaming for their idol. Most stuck around to watch an American flag raised for a 118-107 U.S. victory.
NEWS
January 28, 2008 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
These days, we would call her an outsider artist, but in the 1940s, Florence Foster Jenkins, the 60-ish society eccentric whose musical career is chronicled in Media Theatre's production of Stephen Temperley's Souvenir, was regarded as a one-of-a-kind oddball spectacle, the William Hung of her day. Her intimate "concerts," first attended by close friends, widened in scope as word of her melodic, um, talents, spread. Jenkins, who believed she compared favorably with the world's great sopranos, regaled her audiences with ridiculous costumes, onstage histrionics as she clumsily acted out the lyrics to her chosen tunes, and a voice so startlingly awful that those who came to hear her were often moved to stuff handkerchiefs in their mouths to stifle their laughter.
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