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Lightning Rod

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NEWS
April 8, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, STAFF WRITER
IF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN came back to visit the science museum that bears his name, he'd find that a new digital sign along his Ben Franklin Parkway has become something of a lightning rod. After nearly four years of zoning and court battles, the Franklin Institute is expected - in a matter of weeks - to convert its traditional sign, at 20th Street and the parkway, into a digital sign that changes its message every 20 seconds. But if critics have their way, it won't happen. A flurry of emails between L&I Commissioner David Perri and longtime billboard critic Mary C. Tracy suggest that some city officials were exploring ways to stop the sign from going digital.
NEWS
January 10, 2008 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Auspitz has resigned as chairman of the city Zoning Board of Adjustment after nearly five years in the job. Auspitz, a board member for 10 years, said yesterday that he submitted his resignation Dec. 17 and officially left the board Monday. Mayor Nutter, who had criticized Auspitz's stewardship, is expected to name a replacement soon. Auspitz, former owner of the Famous Deli and still owner of Famous Fourth Street Cookies at the Reading Terminal, declined to comment on his tenure.
NEWS
September 28, 2006
Whether or not Terrell Owens' medical emergency was the result of an intentional drug overdose, Philadelphians should wish him well. Few breaking sports stories have traveled faster through this city than the news yesterday that the former Eagle was hospitalized in Dallas after what a police report characterized as a suicide attempt. The Cowboys' star was discharged from the hospital and denied that he had tried to harm himself. He said he had suffered a bad reaction from painkillers and herbal supplements as he tries to heal a broken hand.
NEWS
June 8, 2002 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Benjamin Franklin flew a kite in a thunderstorm 250 years ago this month, he sparked debates that continue today. It was, at once, one of the most profound experiments in the history of science and one of the most poorly documented. Every schoolchild knows the electrifying story, but scholars are still debating what really happened. For one thing, did he really do it? If he did do it, was he scooped by the French? Why didn't he publicize his triumph? For his 1752 experiments with "electric fire" and invention of the lightning rod, Franklin won international fame.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2010
"Although the economic outlook is improving, the recovery is still pretty tepid. " "This is a jobless recovery, and the market will have to get used to that. " "Just over the next five years, we'll create 500,000 jobs around the world. " "Men and breasts. That's what it was about. " "It's right that I should be the lightning rod. I'm so far unscathed. " - BP chief executive Tony Hayward, on criticism of him related to the Gulf of Mexico oil spill "This will be the mother of all liability claims.
NEWS
October 19, 1999 | By Mike Madden, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Think lightning never strikes twice? Try telling the folks who live in the Beagle Club neighborhood. In the last year and a half, bolts of lightning have destroyed two houses by starting fires. After the second blaze a month ago, residents of the 500-home development, which is off Cooper Road, started making nervous phone calls to get lightning rods put on their homes. "It's gotten some people concerned," said Bill Frazier, who has been talking to the local government about the lightning with his wife, Camille, who is active in the homeowners' association.
NEWS
January 17, 1998 | Inquirer photographs by Michael S. Wirtz
Benjamin Franklin's 292d birthday was celebrated a day early yesterday at the Franklin Institute. Throngs of children were on hand to blow out candles on a giant cake. Senior curator John "Johnny White Gloves" Alviti brought out the lightning rod used by Franklin.
NEWS
April 16, 2016
ISSUE | DIGITAL SIGNS Assault on the senses Digital signs are jarringly out of place next to Philadelphia's classic architecture and are distracting to motorists and pedestrians ("Franklin Institute sign a lightning rod," Philly.com, April 7). When I drive west on Spruce Street, the super-bright digital sign on the Kimmel Center assaults my eyes. At least dial down the brightness. The same goes for the billboards on I-95 - they'll still be awful, but I'll be able to focus on the road.
NEWS
June 9, 2002 | By J.A. Leo Lemay
When Ben Franklin succeeded in drawing "electric fire" (as sparks of electricity were then called) from the sky, he realized that he had triumphed over ages of superstition regarding lightning. One common belief was that lightning could be avoided by ringing church bells. Franklin ironically observed that "it has not been found by experience, that places within the reach of such blessed sound are safer than others where it is never heard; but that, on the contrary, the lightning seems to strike steeples of choice, and that at the very time the bells are ringing; yet still they continue to bless the new bells, and jangle the old ones whenever it thunders.
SPORTS
September 5, 2008 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rolen away from retirement Back in early August, struggling Blue Jays third baseman Scott Rolen wondered if he was near the end of his career as his left shoulder, which had undergone three operations in the past, stiffened again. "There were numerous, numerous nights - and this isn't something that you hear coming out of an athlete very often - that I went home and told my wife, 'I can't do it . . . this shoulder . . . I don't know,' " Rolen told the Toronto Star. Rolen, 33, was placed on the disabled list Aug. 10, and after going home to Florida, rehabilitating the shoulder, and reflecting with his longtime friend and former Phillies therapist Hap Hudson, the ex-Phillie feels rejuvenated.
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NEWS
April 16, 2016
ISSUE | DIGITAL SIGNS Assault on the senses Digital signs are jarringly out of place next to Philadelphia's classic architecture and are distracting to motorists and pedestrians ("Franklin Institute sign a lightning rod," Philly.com, April 7). When I drive west on Spruce Street, the super-bright digital sign on the Kimmel Center assaults my eyes. At least dial down the brightness. The same goes for the billboards on I-95 - they'll still be awful, but I'll be able to focus on the road.
NEWS
April 8, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, STAFF WRITER
IF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN came back to visit the science museum that bears his name, he'd find that a new digital sign along his Ben Franklin Parkway has become something of a lightning rod. After nearly four years of zoning and court battles, the Franklin Institute is expected - in a matter of weeks - to convert its traditional sign, at 20th Street and the parkway, into a digital sign that changes its message every 20 seconds. But if critics have their way, it won't happen. A flurry of emails between L&I Commissioner David Perri and longtime billboard critic Mary C. Tracy suggest that some city officials were exploring ways to stop the sign from going digital.
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ROBERT H. BORK, who stepped in to fire the Watergate prosecutor at Richard Nixon's behest and whose failed 1987 nomination to the Supreme Court helped draw the modern boundaries of cultural fights over abortion, civil rights and other issues, died Wednesday. He was 85. Robert H. Bork Jr. confirmed that his father died at Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington, Va., from complications of heart ailments. Brilliant, blunt and piercingly witty, Robert Heron Bork had a long career in the law that took him from respected academic to a totem of conservative grievance.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
AS NEW JERSEY settles into the "After Sandy" era, Gov. Chris Christie has put his trademark fleece jacket back in the closet. For the last two weeks, Christie's been all over the state and in national headlines, as he toured every corner of New Jersey touched by Hurricane Sandy. His Halloween tour with President Obama of Brigantine, Atlantic County, and his praise of the president's efforts sparked debate in conservative circles, with many wondering whether Christie torpedoed any chances Mitt Romney had to win last week's election.
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe Watkins has worked for a U.S. president and a senator, has served as an investment company manager, and twice ran for statewide office. In 2010, Students First, the pro-vouchers and charter-school political action committee he headed, made the largest total contribution from a single source to one candidate in Pennsylvania history - $3.3 million to Philadelphia Democrat Anthony Hardy Williams. Watkins, 59, lives in Philadelphia, where he's the pastor of a North Philadelphia church.
NEWS
July 21, 2012 | By Susan Snyder and Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writers
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - Liz Grove's tears splashed onto the concrete a few feet from the bronze statue of her hero, Joe Paterno. She had held herself together through a week of blame and accusation against the coach, but broke down when a small plane appeared overhead trailing a banner that warned, "Take the statue down or we will. " "You really think this is helping the victims?" the 50-year-old shouted. Then she said quietly, "People, outside people, don't realize what they're doing to us. It's really upsetting.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2010
"Although the economic outlook is improving, the recovery is still pretty tepid. " "This is a jobless recovery, and the market will have to get used to that. " "Just over the next five years, we'll create 500,000 jobs around the world. " "Men and breasts. That's what it was about. " "It's right that I should be the lightning rod. I'm so far unscathed. " - BP chief executive Tony Hayward, on criticism of him related to the Gulf of Mexico oil spill "This will be the mother of all liability claims.
NEWS
May 15, 2010 | By MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com 215-854-2656
Brian Tierney has agreed to step down as chief executive of the company that owns the Daily News , Inquirer and philly.com on May 21. . He will remain as publisher of the Inquirer until the bankrupt company is officially sold to its prospective owners and will be available to consult with the new owners "as needed," according to a statement released yesterday on behalf of Tierney. Yesterday's agreement resolved differences between Tierney and the papers' incoming owners that had threatened to torpedo a peaceful transition until ownership officially changes hands.
SPORTS
March 26, 2010 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Roy Halladay has been on the road that Donovan McNabb may be traveling soon. He was the face of a franchise, the subject of intense trade rumors that left him exhausted and disappointed. Finally, after 12 years, Halladay was traded from Toronto and the only organization he had known, and given the fresh start he felt he needed in Philadelphia. "I would say it was more excitement than relief," Halladay said yesterday. "We were prepared to go back to Toronto.
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