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NEWS
October 11, 2006
IKNOW YOU were trying to be the witty one with your editorial on limbo, but aren't there more important things going on in the world to editorialize about? Regarding the Catholic Church, I applaud their efforts in denouncing the existence of limbo. The church needs to review its doctrines to determine just what is Scripturally based, and what is not. Dennis McGlinchey, Philadelphia
SPORTS
January 27, 1989 | By Diane Pucin, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Hey, 'Train,' " Randy Woods says, "have a good one. " La Salle star Lionel Simmons, a.k.a. Train, looks up five rows into the stands of the Palestra and gives Woods a wide smile and a thumbs-up sign. Simmons has just taken his final warm-up shot before Wednesday's key Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference game with St. Peter's, and he is repairing to the bench for some last-minute instructions from coach Speedy Morris. Woods, wearing a blue sweat suit with gold lettering proclaiming "La Salle" on the front, looks longingly at that bench.
NEWS
February 15, 1986
If you want to know what being in limbo is like, ask the Conrail employees. Although we don't want Norfolk Southern to buy us, it's hell not knowing what's going to happen to us. Between President Reagan and Secretary of Transportation Elizabeth Dole, they want to get rid of Conrail, which is a money-making enterprise. Do they take a high bid? No, the lowest. Do they concern themselves with antitrust laws? No, they try to change them to suit themselves. Do they care about the employees who will lose their jobs?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Alain Tanner's No Man's Land is a metaphor in search of a movie. Geographically, it is set on the narrow strip of land that separates the borders of France and Switzerland. Philosophically, Tanner finds this terrain a pungent symbol of alienation - a limbo for lost souls and defeated purposes. But in No Man's Land it never becomes more than an image, because no one in the movie emerges as a character. All eke out a living as small-time crooks and hustlers, but Tanner's screenplay is so filled with existentialist pomposity that each one of them can only be identified by an aspiration or a frustration.
SPORTS
July 28, 1992 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Magic Johnson appears to be out of the U.S. men's basketball game against Germany tomorrow night. Whether he's out longer than that remains unclear. Johnson, the starting point guard, limped off last night with what he described "as a pull" at the rear of his right knee. Johnson underwent a magnetic resonance imaging examination, which was negative, at a nearby hospital. USA Basketball physician David Fischer called the injury a strained muscle and classified his availability as "day to day. " "We just don't know what it is," Johnson said immediately after the Dream Team's 103-70 victory over Croatia.
NEWS
May 26, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the last minute, the Philadelphia School Reform Commission opted not to make a decision on what will happen to West Philadelphia High in September. The struggling school has been designated a "Renaissance" school, one of 14 that is to be radically restructured in the fall. The other 13 will either be turned into charters or run by Superintendent Arlene Ackerman, with longer school days and years, new programs and mostly new teaching forces. The fates of the other 13 were decided two weeks ago. West was deferred until Wednesday to give the school advisory committee more time to make a decision.
NEWS
March 19, 2003 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hours melt during The Wait, bringing us closer to President Bush's deadline for Iraq. Since Monday, when Bush gave Saddam Hussein 48 hours to leave Iraq or face U.S. forces, the world has been functioning in an odd sort of limbo - not at war, but certainly not at peace. Soldiers' families greeted the President's ultimatum with a kind of anxious relief yesterday, feeling that the sooner a war started, the quicker it would end. Others, though, are experiencing a sort of dread as the clock sweeps toward 8 tonight, fearful that the war's first volleys will unleash an unpredictable tumult both in the Middle East and here at home.
NEWS
October 6, 2006
FIRST PLUTO, now limbo. Pope Benedict XVI is expected to announce today that the Catholic Church will no longer recognize limbo as a viable place, and we are not happy. It was only a little over a month ago that astronomers downgraded Pluto from a planet to dwarf status, and we still haven't adjusted. If the pope makes the announcement, it will mean the church will disavow limbo as a place where unbaptized babies and others hang out before they get to enter heaven. Limbo is a concept originally discussed by St. Augustine more than 1,500 years ago, then further embroidered by St. Thomas Aquinas and Dante.
NEWS
October 13, 2006 | By Trish Boppert
Score one for every former kid who itched and twitched his or her way through class in a Catholic school uniform, brows furrowed whilst pondering brain-melting concepts like omnipotence and whether (beneath the starched headgear they wore back in the day) nuns were bald. Limbo is no longer the slam dunk eternal destination of babies with the temerity to die before baptism, so-called good pagans, and everybody (and his mother) who was born before Jesus. Nicer than Hell, but lacking that je ne sais quoi only Heaven can boast, Limbo was presented (to my first-grade class, anyway)
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | By Tim Panaccio, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bristol basketball coach Tom Kaczor is in District 1's version of limbo. As of June 21 - eight days after the district committee met to decide Kaczor's fate over alleged ethics (in recruiting) violations - neither the committee nor the PIAA has released its ruling. As reported in The Inquirer on June 17, Kaczor may be facing a one-year suspension, according to two committee sources. Even Bristol principal Anthony DiPietro has acknowledged that the supension is "likely. " District chiarman Bob Ruoff, however, won't confirm it. "From what I've been told, everyone seems to know what we did in that meeting but I can't comment just yet," Ruoff said last week.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 26, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
Neil DeRiemer and his wife, Karen, used to look out their bedroom windows and see a waterfall cascading over a small dam just a few feet away. Like their neighbors, they watched blue herons, white egrets, and black turtles wade in the seven-acre basin that made their East Goshen homes waterfront properties. "It was like living in Longwood Gardens," said DeRiemer, 70. "How many waterfalls are left in Chester County?" Now Hershey's Mill Dam is dry, its basin drained after it failed state safety inspections about nine years ago. And township officials are facing a decision that has languished for years: what to do with a dam that some consider a defining landmark for their small Chester County community.
SPORTS
January 14, 2016 | BY LES BOWEN, Staff Writer
THE EAGLES' coaching search was on hiatus Tuesday, as team chairman Jeffrey Lurie attended league meetings in Houston concerning franchises wanting to relocate to Los Angeles. As far as we know, no more interviews are scheduled right now. This might mean the team is deciding among the candidates it has already met with, or it might just be a matter of scheduling. The Eagles talked to two members of their current staff — offensive coordinator Pat Shurmur and running backs coach Duce Staley.
NEWS
August 5, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A plan to help the victims of the Amtrak Train 188 derailment will be stuck in limbo for weeks - maybe months - as Congress heads to its summer break, leaving open the question of how much money could be available for those who suffered devastating injuries and the families of passengers who were killed. At issue is a 1997 law that caps the liability in rail accidents at $200 million, an amount that experts say likely will not be enough to cover the damages for the eight people killed and more than 200 injured in the Philadelphia accident.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the fate of Truebright Science Academy Charter School in limbo, the Philadelphia School District on Wednesday announced a plan for students interested in transferring in the fall to district schools. After the 2015 graduating class, about 300 students will remain at the charter in Olney, according to Peng Chao, an administrator in the district's charter office. High school students who want to transfer can register at the district's comprehensive high schools beginning Aug. 19. Because Lincoln and Northeast High Schools are at capacity, only students from those catchment areas will be allowed to enroll there.
SPORTS
May 3, 2015 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
MIKE BABCOCK didn't hesitate. Addressing reporters in Detroit yesterday for the first time since his Red Wings were eliminated by Braydon Coburn and Tampa Bay on Wednesday night in Game 7 of their first-round NHL playoff series, Babcock said he struggled on Thursday. "The worst day I've had coaching in Detroit, period, in my 10 years here was [Thursday], bar none," Babcock said. "So was that because I thought in my heart we were going to win that series and that we should still be playing?
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
James F. Kenney's resignation from Philadelphia City Council, after 23 years in which he sponsored hundreds of bills, has placed several of his would-be laws in legislative limbo. With almost a year until his seat is filled, Kenney said, he hopes his colleagues see some of his ideas through. As it stands, bills that he introduced that didn't make it out of committee died with his departure. Among the casualties are bills banning most parking on the City Hall apron, expanding the Historical Commission, making permanent the Inspector General's Office, and prohibiting deposits in certain banks.
NEWS
October 1, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Under a settlement with the state, 27 same-sex couples who wed in the summer of 2013 will be recognized as married, but their legal anniversaries will move to May 20, 2014. Ballen v. Wolf is one of at least three lawsuits against the state that have been in limbo since May, when a federal judge struck down Pennsylvania's ban on gay marriage. Before that ruling, nearly 200 gay and lesbian couples received marriage licenses from Montgomery County Register of Wills D. Bruce Hanes, who argued that the state's ban was unconstitutional.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The South Jersey developer and philanthropist Roger J. Davis declared himself "elated" after a legal battle that had stymied construction of his Tricia Meadows project finally got resolved in 1983. Thirty-one years later, Davis Enterprises Inc. is involved in another slow-moving court case about Tricia Meadows, a well-maintained community of manufactured homes in Mount Laurel where 46 of 432 units have long been set aside for lower-income residents. This time, however, the Evesham Township firm seeks to phase out, rather than provide, affordable housing.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEASIDE HEIGHTS, N.J. - In a hut beneath a blue awning, his colorful taffy and delectable chocolates on display, Bernt Hage has eked out a season on a piece of boardwalk that had been reduced to its literal limits. While Hage's temporary 200-square-foot structure serves its purpose, it's in no way comparable to his two Berkeley Sweet Shop locations lost in a massive fire last year. At 3,000 square feet, his main location allowed patrons to watch as a 1948 German taffy machine worked its magic.
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