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LIVING
August 22, 2008 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Storm experts are saying this Atlantic hurricane season could be worse than usual. But it doesn't take more than a thunderstorm with strong wind, or even a low-intensity winter squall, to send tree limbs crashing down onto property. Why not do some preventive tree maintenance? Here are tips from a variety of sources. Need to know: University of Georgia professor Kim Coder says trees are engineered to adjust to wind loading - that is, a breeze from one direction applied evenly over the stem, branches and tree leaves.
NEWS
February 3, 2011 | By WILL BUNCH, bunchw@phillynews.com 215-854-2957
Yesterday, the trees were not your friend. Ice-crusted limbs were the culprits that took out power lines throughout the Philadelphia region, causing about 100,000 homes in the Pennsylvania suburbs to lose power at the peak of yet another major wintry blast. By the time the assault of freezing rain let up amid rising temperatures by the middle of the day, Amtrak's busy Northeast Corridor service between Philadelphia and New York had been knocked out for a time, and more than 100 suburban districts canceled yet another school day. But the biggest lasting local impact from the outer edge of the same 2,000-mile monster storm that caused a blizzard in Chicago and ripped apart the roof of fabled Wrigley Field were the widespread power outages - some of which lasted into today.
NEWS
October 6, 2005 | By Steve Goldstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
They are the new bionic soldiers. Once given honorable discharges, amputees are regaining remarkable mobility with new prosthetics, and some are even choosing to return to the battlefield in Afghanistan and Iraq. U.S. troops who have lost one leg - or two - can walk, run and even swim with high-tech, computerized limbs. Arms and hands are replaced by prosthetics controlled by sensors that react to electronic impulses from undamaged muscles. The war in Iraq has claimed the lives of nearly 2,000 U.S. service members, but it has also drastically altered life for hundreds more who have lost limbs.
NEWS
December 25, 1994 | ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer correspondent Karla Haworth contributed to this article
A storm that blustered up the East Coast left more than 175,000 customers without power in New England yesterday and littered highways and railroad tracks with tree limbs on one of the year's busiest travel days. The Jersey Shore was largely spared, however. High winds knocked over the 50-foot, 7,300-pound Christmas tree outside the Prudential Center in Boston. Crews waited for the wind to die down before trying to put it back up. "The storm was stronger than we expected.
NEWS
May 15, 1997 | By Anthony Beckman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
PennDot will be revving up its chainsaws this month to tear into the 300-year-old sycamore tree near the Brandywine River. But only half the tree will go. In what officials said was the only viable compromise, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation will severely prune the ancient tree on South Creek Road. The thick - and potentially hazardous - limbs that stretch over the road will go, leaving about 50 percent of the canopy intact, said Kevin Munley, PennDot's roadside manager for the region.
NEWS
April 2, 1997 | By Walter Naedele and Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Inquirer staff writers Clea Benson and Mark Davis and Inquirer correspondents Nancy Petersen and Rachel Smolkin contributed to this article
It left as quickly as it came. By today, only crippled evergreens and downed limbs will remain of the worst winter storm of the season, which hit, by the way, 10 days after winter's end. The long-term cost to the homeowner: The storm probably did its worst damage to small trees just beginning to flower, such as magnolias and cherries. Hardier trees might have lost some limbs. And experts say the storm should cause no lasting damage to area lawns. In fact, the bright greens returned so quickly yesterday that it was hard to believe that stinging, howling winds and blinding snows had fallen in much of the region from late morning Monday to yesterday morning.
NEWS
February 13, 1999 | By Jack Brown and Lewis Kamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Record-high temperatures tumbled behind a fast-moving cold front that whipped across the region last night with thunderstorms and high winds and then dealt a backhand with snow, sleet and ice-slickened roadways. Two nursing home residents suffered minor injuries when wind gusts - strong enough to snap huge trees nearby in half - hit their facility in Middletown Township, Bucks County, causing ceiling tiles to fall on them. Winds estimated at 40 m.p.h. in Tredyffrin Township, Chester County, left as many as 3,000 Peco Energy Co. customers without power about 4 p.m. Traffic signals were also idled by the outage, snarling rush-hour traffic along commuter-clogged Route 202. A record-high temperature of 70 degrees was logged at Philadelphia International Airport at 2:31 p.m., shattering the record for the same date set in 1898, 61 degrees.
NEWS
February 6, 1995 | By Marilou Regan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
About 1,500 houses in the Upper Darby and Morton areas were without power yesterday afternoon for more than two hours because of tree limbs that downed power lines, according to a Peco Energy Co. spokesman. "All it takes is one tree limb to pull down one wire and you can have 800 homes affected," said Peco spokesman David Hackney. "And when you have 40- to 50-mile-an-hour winds like we did today, you can expect problems. " Fortunately, Hackney said, the problems were not widespread and could be taken care of in a reasonably short time.
NEWS
March 23, 2000 | By Lisa Fine and Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
It started as a rescue mission to save a stray cat named Ugly. But the Good Samaritans' canoe capsized, forcing rescue workers to pluck the pair from the rain-swollen Brandywine River in Concord Township, Delaware County. "When I got home, I got hollered at: 'What were you thinking?' " Steven Menasion said his wife asked him. Police said Menasion, 40, of Chadds Ford, was one of two canoeists who found themselves stranded on limbs and debris after their canoe collided with a tree.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2016 | By Kevin Brasler, DELAWARE VALLEY CONSUMERS' CHECKBOOK
It's easy to think that trees are among the few great things in life that are free. They increase our property values, provide shade, create autumn scenery, and help create the air we breathe. But sometimes, there may be a price. To keep your trees healthy or to get rid of dying ones, you may want the benefit of professional advice, skill, and labor. To help you find this help, nonprofit consumer group Delaware Valley Consumers' Checkbook magazine and Checkbook.org surveyed members and Consumer Reports subscribers about their experiences with area tree-care services.
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BUSINESS
August 28, 2016 | By Kevin Brasler, DELAWARE VALLEY CONSUMERS' CHECKBOOK
It's easy to think that trees are among the few great things in life that are free. They increase our property values, provide shade, create autumn scenery, and help create the air we breathe. But sometimes, there may be a price. To keep your trees healthy or to get rid of dying ones, you may want the benefit of professional advice, skill, and labor. To help you find this help, nonprofit consumer group Delaware Valley Consumers' Checkbook magazine and Checkbook.org surveyed members and Consumer Reports subscribers about their experiences with area tree-care services.
NEWS
March 13, 2016 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Poorly controlled diabetes can spawn a host of medical problems that can lead to amputations, but generally, a triad of issues tend to be present. Neuropathy, a nerve condition that numbs the feet and toes, can prevent people with diabetes from feeling pain in their toes or feet, which which could lead to their not knowing about injuries, or neglecting them. Circulation problems may interfere with wound healing, which, in turn, can lead to sepsis, or overwhelming infections. And a slowed down immune response means that many with diabetes have trouble fighting off infections, which can lead to amputations.
NEWS
December 31, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
The Rev. Rick Curry embraced his disability as a gift and used it to empower thousands. When Richard Jerome Curry was born without a right forearm and hand, his mother wept, and his father fled to a bar near the family home in Southwest Philadelphia. The missing limb would define him, people told the boy - he could never be a soldier or a doctor or a priest. The difference did define him, but in no way that his parents or early teachers had imagined. After spending much of his life as a Jesuit brother, Father Curry received a special dispensation from the Vatican to become a priest at age 66. He earned a doctorate.
NEWS
November 17, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
A competition called Health Hack - where medical pros, engineers, artists, and an insurer tried to develop creative health-care solutions - produced several winners at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital over the weekend. About 250 people took part in the first Independence/Jefferson Health Hack, brainstorming for ways to reduce hospital admissions, improve wearable limbs, and use drones to deliver care. In the drones category, the winner was Tigerdrone, which can search for people injured in disasters or war zones.
NEWS
December 14, 2014 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mummenschanz is not a holiday show, but it's still a great family-friendly December treat, appropriate for any child who can sit still. In fact, it was almost as fun to hear children's screams of delight on opening night Thursday at the Annenberg Center, as it was to watch the wacky magic happening on stage. In just under two hours, including an intermission, Mummenschanz presents a series of short, enchanting vignettes that turned tubes and bits of fabric into amusing and sympathetic characters.
SPORTS
August 25, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
The last limb of the old tree was lopped off Saturday, when the 76ers traded forward Thaddeus Young as part of a three-team swapfest that brings back two ordinary bench players and a future first-round draft pick. To be honest, and this is the reason for all the lopping, it wasn't that much of a tree to begin with, but it was all the Sixers had during the end of the pinchpenny reign of Father Comcast and the start of the Joshua Harris ownership era. It was sturdy enough in the weather of an NBA season to win 40-45 games and make the playoffs, but never a whole lot more than that.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nobody pines for a disastrous storm, but this winter, business has been coming out of the woodwork for tree specialists. The broken limbs and falling trees that resulted from last week's ice storm meant stress and holes in the roof for some. But to others it has been a moneymaker. Tree removal companies have been getting a lot of calls and a lot of business. "I've been doing this 42 years, and it's never been worse - or better for me, anyway," said Rick Crecraft of Crecraft for Tree Craft in Wayne.
NEWS
July 18, 2013
What's a human life worth? Apparently not enough when it came to weighing the possibility that someone might die if a Philadelphia building wasn't demolished properly. Although they were warned of that danger, none of the people who could have prevented a tragedy acted before the worst thing imaginable occurred. The demolition of a Center City building went ahead and, on June 5, caused a wall to fall on an adjacent Salvation Army thrift store, killing six people and injuring 13. How do we know there were missed opportunities to prevent deaths and injuries?
NEWS
April 22, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
How the heck did he get on that island? How long has he been there? How the heck did he get cigarettes? How did he get Beanie-Weenies?" Those are just a few of the urgent questions Matthew McConaughey had for Jeff Nichols once the actor had pored over the writer/director's screenplay, Mud , and signed on to play the title role - a fugitive wanted for murder hiding out on a deserted island in the middle of the Mississippi, down Arkansas...
SPORTS
November 2, 2012 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Staff Writer
NEWS THAT the Eagles held a players-only meeting in the aftermath of their three-game losing streak comes as no surprise. It is a familiar dynamic, right out of The Standard NFL Locker Room Manual. If form holds, what will follow is the ritual circling of the wagons, followed by the blaming of the media, followed by - in the event they beat the New Orleans Saints on Monday night - the proclamation that "nobody believed in us except for the 53 people in this room. " And, et cetera. Far more interesting was quarterback Michael Vick's proclamation that he was going to throw off whatever mental constraints have been holding him back and just be himself again.
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