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Lincoln University

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NEWS
October 27, 1994 | For The Inquirer / S. D. ROWAN
Once a year, colleges and universities welcome their alumni back with pageantry, parades, kings, queens, music and other celebrations. So it was with Lincoln University's homecoming on Saturday, as the streets of Lincoln University were filled with students and alumni. A dance troupe and gospel ensemble performed before the homecoming parade, which ended at Wright Hall on the campus.
NEWS
June 11, 1995 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Herman R. Branson, 80, of Silver Spring, Md., a distinguished physicist who served as the 10th president of Lincoln University, died Wednesday at a Washington, D.C., hospital. Dr. Branson taught physics at Howard University in Washington from 1941 to 1968, when he was named president of Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio. In 1971, he took over the presidency of Lincoln University, serving until 1985. The school, near Oxford, Chester County, is the nation's oldest traditionally black university.
NEWS
April 6, 2013
The Middle States Commission on Higher Education has approved a Lincoln University plan to open a campus in Coatesville. Classes will start in the fall at a new branch of the historically black college, at 351 Kersey St. Courses initially will be offered in the evening and on weekends. Other classes will be added as enrollment increases. For information on undergraduate admissions, contact 484-365-7207; for the graduate school, call 215-590-8233. - Kristin E. Holmes
NEWS
December 13, 2000 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. Ridge held up an oversize ceremonial check, blank side out, yesterday and announced to his Lincoln University audience, "We've identified a long list of things to be done here. " Ridge's humor, and the amount of $29.4 million written out on the other side of the check, were appreciated by the Lincoln University students, staff and faculty who attended the presentation of the state's cash to pay for infrastructure improvements at the southern Chester County campus. "These are things that are behind walls and under the ground," Ridge said.
NEWS
October 1, 1986 | By Larry Lewis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lincoln University, which has provided higher education for blacks since before the Civil War, has named a University of Michigan cultural anthropologist and administrator as president. Niara Sudarkasa, 48, who has carried out her primary research in West Africa, will assume leadership of the school on Feb. 1. She is the first woman named to the top post at the school, which is in Oxford Township in southern Chester County. Her goal at Lincoln University, she said in a telephone interview yesterday, will be to build on the tradition of excellence the school had about 50 years ago, when it was referred to as the "black Princeton" and its students included poet Langston Hughes and Associate Justice Thurgood Marshall of the U.S. Supreme Court.
NEWS
September 29, 1986 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
A 48-year-old anthropologist who, as a child, idolized legendary black educator Mary McLeod Bethune, is the 11th person - and first woman - to be named president of Lincoln University, one of the nation's more celebrated predominantly black universities. Niara Sudarkasa, anthropology professor and associate vice president for academic affairs at the University of Michigan, was unanimously approved for the post at a weekend meeting of the board of trustees at the Chester County university.
NEWS
June 19, 1994 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Charles C. Duncan, 55, chairman of the psychology department at Lincoln University, died June 9 in Denver, where he was visiting family members. He had been chairman of the department for last eight years. He had joined the university faculty in 1980 as an assistant professor. During his tenure, Dr. Duncan directed the Office of Institutional Research and the Biomedical Research Support Program. In 1986, he won the Christian and Mary Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching, and in 1988 he won the Lincoln University Faculty Achievement Award, becoming one of the first faculty members so honored, a university spokeswoman said.
NEWS
October 18, 1986 | By Meredith M. Henry, Special to The Inquirer
Lincoln University's incoming president yesterday outlined her plans to guide the predominantly black liberal arts college into the 21st century by improving its standing in the academic community. "If every time people mentioned Swarthmore and Oberlin they mentioned Lincoln, too, I'd be very happy," said Niara Sudarkasa, who will assume her new position Feb. 1. Sudarkasa, 48, an associate vice president for academic affairs and a professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan, discussed her goals at a 45-minute news conference held in one of the 19th-century buildings on the university's rural campus in Oxford Township, Chester County.
NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Citing falling enrollment, sluggish fund-raising, and a turnover in staff, the faculty union at Lincoln University this week took a vote of no confidence in the school's president, according to several people with knowledge of the matter. The vote came about five months after the university's alumni association voted no confidence in Robert R. Jennings, who has presided over the historically black university since January 2012. "Overall," said Robert Ingram, president of the 700-member alumni association, "there's a loss of confidence in his ability to lead the university at a very critical time for colleges and universities in America" - especially historically black colleges and universities.
NEWS
October 23, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maurice Bertrand's football physique likely saved his life when he was shot five times on a blistering summer day last year in Camden. When he arrived at Cooper University Hospital, "first thing they said was, 'This guy is still alive?' " Bertrand recalled recently at Lincoln University in Chester County, where he has resumed the sport many thought he'd never play again. Doctors, including Robert Ostrum, the surgeon who helped save former New Jersey Gov. Jon S. Corzine after a serious auto accident, rushed to tend to Bertrand's injuries: High-caliber bullets had broken Bertrand's right thigh bone into 10 or 15 pieces, gone through his left ankle, and struck his back; one hit his left biceps so hard it went through his shoulder and into his eye. Bertrand's large body - 6-foot-2 and 280 pounds - helped stop the bullets from puncturing vital organs.
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NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Since 2008, state funding for higher education has eroded significantly across the country, and Pennsylvania has been one of the hardest-hit states, says a new report being released Thursday. State funding per student for public colleges and universities in Pennsylvania is down 33 percent from 2007-08 when adjusted for inflation, according to the report by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a Washington think tank. In March, the Assembly approved the first increase in higher education funding for the 14-university State System of Higher Education since 2008-09.
SPORTS
May 13, 2016 | By Dick Jerardi, STAFF WRITER
WHEN HIS FRIENDS asked why he would take a Division II coaching job, Doug Overton has been answering simply: "Why not?" I was with Overton 25 years ago when he was student teaching at an elementary school near La Salle University. If he had not had a long NBA career, he probably would have become a schoolteacher. Starting now, he will be "teaching" basketball at Lincoln University in the rolling hills of southern Chester County. "It's great for me to be a part of a school as prestigious as Lincoln University," Overton said after he was introduced as the Lions coach Thursday morning at Lincoln's Market Street campus.
SPORTS
May 12, 2016 | By Dick Jerardi, STAFF WRITER
Lincoln University's most famous alumni are Supreme Court justice Thurgood Marshall and poet Langston Hughes. Lincoln is about to get a pretty famous basketball coach. Big Five Hall of Famer Doug Overton will be introduced as the new coach of the Division II school Thursday at Lincoln's Center City campus on Market Street. Overton, a 1991 La Salle grad, played 11 seasons in the NBA, has been a college and NBA assistant, and most recently was a postgame 76ers analyst on Comcast SportsNet.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Memorial services will be held Thursday, May 5, for former Philadelphia Police Capt. James N. Reaves, 99, a trailblazer for African Americans on the city's police force. Mr. Reaves, of West Philadelphia and then Pennsauken, died Wednesday, March 16, of dementia in Ohio, where he lived with family. He joined the force in 1940, the only African American among 175 recruits that year. He worked as a uniformed patrolman for five years, and spent eight more in the juvenile aid division.
NEWS
April 8, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
Federal agencies have repeatedly advised railroads to use backup safety precautions for workers on the rails after accidents hauntingly similar to Sunday's fatal Amtrak crash in Chester. Sources with knowledge of the crash that killed two have said a communications lapse during a shift change contributed to workers' staying on the rails while safety precautions designed to route trains away from them were canceled. This exact scenario, according to a 2014 Federal Railroad Administration safety advisory, has been an ongoing problem in railroad work.
NEWS
March 12, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, STAFF WRITER
Temple University Thursday appointed a new senior adviser to oversee sexual assault complaints, as well as diversity and equity issues on the 39,000-student campus. "Campus sexual misconduct is one of the most important issues facing higher education today, and it is imperative that we take immediate steps to improve reporting of these incidents and reduce the incidence of sexual assault on our campus," Temple President Neil D. Theobald said. The appointment is the final piece that was recommended last summer by a university task force on the handling of sexual misconduct cases on campus, Theobald said.
NEWS
March 8, 2016
Coatesville police are continuing to investigate Saturday's shooting death of a 22-year-old Philadelphia man near South Fifth Avenue and Olive Street. The shooting victim and a second person were the alleged targets of a planned robbery. Police said they found Christopher Robinson, a student at Lincoln University, suffering from a gunshot wound to the neck. Investigators said the suspect, Evander Wilson, 24, of Coatesville, drove Robinson and a second victim - who remained unidentified - to that location, then telephoned multiple people to come and rob them.
NEWS
March 5, 2016
Swarthmore College, the University of Pennsylvania, and Lehigh University have announced tuition hikes and other institutions in the region are likely to follow. The increases are a stunning reminder that far too little has been done to solve the growing problem of college affordability. Costs continue to rise even though faculty salaries, one of the largest expenses, are as stagnant as wages for other middle-income Americans. La Salle University and other colleges have laid off employees and made other moves to make ends meet.
NEWS
March 3, 2016
ISSUE | PA. BUDGET STALEMATE Don't play politics with university students We, the student-body presidents of Pennsylvania's four state-related universities, have joined to voice the growing frustration and worries of 110,000 students. Because of gridlock in Harrisburg, Penn State, Temple, Pitt, and Lincoln University face the prospect of receiving zero dollars in state allocations this year - a $600 million shortfall ("Threat of layoffs at Penn State," Saturday). If action is not taken, tuition increases, staff layoffs, and program cuts will be needed.
NEWS
February 28, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
HERSHEY - Pennsylvania State University will lay off 1,100 employees and shut down its agricultural extension offices this summer if the state doesn't soon release its funding, president Eric Barron warned Friday. "This is an incredibly serious issue," Barron told the university's trustees. His prediction, delivered during the board's monthly meeting, was among the most dire in the eight-month budget impasse, one that has particularly punished Pennsylvania's four state-related universities.
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