CollectionsLincoln University
IN THE NEWS

Lincoln University

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 27, 1994 | For The Inquirer / S. D. ROWAN
Once a year, colleges and universities welcome their alumni back with pageantry, parades, kings, queens, music and other celebrations. So it was with Lincoln University's homecoming on Saturday, as the streets of Lincoln University were filled with students and alumni. A dance troupe and gospel ensemble performed before the homecoming parade, which ended at Wright Hall on the campus.
NEWS
June 11, 1995 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Herman R. Branson, 80, of Silver Spring, Md., a distinguished physicist who served as the 10th president of Lincoln University, died Wednesday at a Washington, D.C., hospital. Dr. Branson taught physics at Howard University in Washington from 1941 to 1968, when he was named president of Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio. In 1971, he took over the presidency of Lincoln University, serving until 1985. The school, near Oxford, Chester County, is the nation's oldest traditionally black university.
NEWS
April 6, 2013
The Middle States Commission on Higher Education has approved a Lincoln University plan to open a campus in Coatesville. Classes will start in the fall at a new branch of the historically black college, at 351 Kersey St. Courses initially will be offered in the evening and on weekends. Other classes will be added as enrollment increases. For information on undergraduate admissions, contact 484-365-7207; for the graduate school, call 215-590-8233. - Kristin E. Holmes
NEWS
December 13, 2000 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. Ridge held up an oversize ceremonial check, blank side out, yesterday and announced to his Lincoln University audience, "We've identified a long list of things to be done here. " Ridge's humor, and the amount of $29.4 million written out on the other side of the check, were appreciated by the Lincoln University students, staff and faculty who attended the presentation of the state's cash to pay for infrastructure improvements at the southern Chester County campus. "These are things that are behind walls and under the ground," Ridge said.
NEWS
October 1, 1986 | By Larry Lewis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lincoln University, which has provided higher education for blacks since before the Civil War, has named a University of Michigan cultural anthropologist and administrator as president. Niara Sudarkasa, 48, who has carried out her primary research in West Africa, will assume leadership of the school on Feb. 1. She is the first woman named to the top post at the school, which is in Oxford Township in southern Chester County. Her goal at Lincoln University, she said in a telephone interview yesterday, will be to build on the tradition of excellence the school had about 50 years ago, when it was referred to as the "black Princeton" and its students included poet Langston Hughes and Associate Justice Thurgood Marshall of the U.S. Supreme Court.
NEWS
September 29, 1986 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
A 48-year-old anthropologist who, as a child, idolized legendary black educator Mary McLeod Bethune, is the 11th person - and first woman - to be named president of Lincoln University, one of the nation's more celebrated predominantly black universities. Niara Sudarkasa, anthropology professor and associate vice president for academic affairs at the University of Michigan, was unanimously approved for the post at a weekend meeting of the board of trustees at the Chester County university.
NEWS
June 19, 1994 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Charles C. Duncan, 55, chairman of the psychology department at Lincoln University, died June 9 in Denver, where he was visiting family members. He had been chairman of the department for last eight years. He had joined the university faculty in 1980 as an assistant professor. During his tenure, Dr. Duncan directed the Office of Institutional Research and the Biomedical Research Support Program. In 1986, he won the Christian and Mary Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching, and in 1988 he won the Lincoln University Faculty Achievement Award, becoming one of the first faculty members so honored, a university spokeswoman said.
NEWS
October 18, 1986 | By Meredith M. Henry, Special to The Inquirer
Lincoln University's incoming president yesterday outlined her plans to guide the predominantly black liberal arts college into the 21st century by improving its standing in the academic community. "If every time people mentioned Swarthmore and Oberlin they mentioned Lincoln, too, I'd be very happy," said Niara Sudarkasa, who will assume her new position Feb. 1. Sudarkasa, 48, an associate vice president for academic affairs and a professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan, discussed her goals at a 45-minute news conference held in one of the 19th-century buildings on the university's rural campus in Oxford Township, Chester County.
NEWS
January 30, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Robert R. Jennings, the new president of Lincoln University, a college cannot be run as a scholarly sanctuary exempt from trends in the marketplace. A university is a business. "If you don't run it as a business - you'll run it out of business," said Jennings, 61, nearly a month into his tenure as the school's 13th president. That approach, Jennings said, will be a key to his management of the nation's oldest historically black university. When Jennings talks about the school's future, his speech is peppered with terms like branding, marketing, and financial investment in the Chester County school.
NEWS
April 22, 2011 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The president of Lincoln University, who was scheduled to retire June 30, said Thursday that he would continue in the post through the end of the year. A search committee charged with finding a new head for the nation's oldest historically black college has not yet made a choice. Ivory V. Nelson, 76, who has led Lincoln through a $325 million building expansion and a history-making decision to relinquish its control of the Barnes Foundation board of directors, will continue in his post through Dec. 31. "This university is important to me and all of us," Nelson said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A longtime Lincoln University professor drew ire from Pennsylvania officials in 2010 when he called for the destruction of Israel and questioned whether the Holocaust ever happened. But Kaukab Siddique, a 72-year-old associate professor of English, kept his job. Now he's mouthing off again. "Don't be scared of these dirty Jewish Zionist White Supremacist thugs," he wrote in a Facebook post in May. Earlier this month he wondered why it took Bill Cosby's accusers so long to come forward.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN DAISY REAVES walked the crowded halls of Simon Gratz High School, the students made way for her. A slightly built woman, Daisy nevertheless exuded a quiet authority that commanded respect even from the toughest kids in a tough school. Daisy was the principal of Simon Gratz in the 1970s and '80s, and she faced daily challenges trying to run an inner-city school with predominantly poor students in a school building that was falling apart. Thievery, vandalism and violence were endemic.
NEWS
June 20, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Florence B. Watson, 71, of Glenside, a retired human resources official, died Friday, June 12, of complications from dementia at home. Mrs. Watson was born in Philadelphia, the daughter of Julia Jones and Walter D. Jones. Called Florrie by family and friends, Mrs. Watson graduated from John W. Hallahan Catholic Girls' High School in 1961. Taking into account her life experience, she was able to earn the equivalent of a bachelor's degree and also a master's degree in human resources from Lincoln University in 1985.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sayre P. Schatz, 92, of Melrose Park, an internationally known expert on African economics and professor emeritus of economics at Temple University, died Thursday, May 7, of Alzheimer's disease at the Quadrangle in Haverford. A World War II veteran, Dr. Schatz was drawn to the field of African economics in the 1950s, when few scholars were interested in the subject. He went on to author several books and dozens of articles on the topic, many of which were translated into other languages.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing in front of about 100 people - black, white, Latino, Indian, male, female, young, old - Lisa Croft talked about the elephant in the room. "It's not just there to sit and look pretty," she said. "Sometimes we need courageous people to . . . say what that elephant is. " That was the essence of the discussion at the daylong "Courageous Conversation" at West Chester University on Saturday. The diverse crowd talked about "implicit" biases: ingrained beliefs that can influence behavior, often subconsciously.
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Someone spray-painted the N-word on a sign at the entrance of Lincoln University overnight, according to a message sent to the university community Thursday morning. Public safety officers at the university in Chester County discovered the graffiti on its northwest corner entrance sign at 1:50 a.m., and the word was gone later Thursday morning, officials said. "This incident is a sober reminder that our forebearers persevered in the face of hatred and intimidation, yet achieved and maintained standards for excellence which Lincoln University has become known," acting president Valerie I. Harrison told the university community.
NEWS
February 12, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rosa Mae Oates, 85, of Germantown, an administrative assistant and church stalwart, died Friday, Feb. 6, of a heart attack at home. Mrs. Oates graduated from Simon Gratz High School, then earned a certification in practical nursing before going to work at the Philadelphia Department of Public Assistance. She spent the bulk of her career at the Women's Christian Alliance, retiring as a senior administrative assistant after 38 years. Mrs. Oates was keenly interested in politics and current events, and a highlight of her life was meeting then-U.S.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
LEWIS THOMAS III once said that he wanted to be president of the United States. If his resume is to be believed, the North Philly native practically has one foot in the White House door. Thomas, who has been laying the foundation for a possible City Council run, is only 37, but he's already lived what he has described as a "rich and varied" life. According to news reports and Thomas' shifting online biographies, he has traveled the world, from Brazil to Africa to Russia, obtained two master's degrees and a doctorate, "transformed" a low-performing Washington, D.C., high school and worked as a "sought after advisor and campaign manager for candidates across the country," including then-Sens.
NEWS
December 23, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ALEXIS MCKINNEY had strong empathy for people who she believed suffered from society's various inequities. She not only had empathy, she had the passion and drive to do something about it. Her focus was mainly on the problems of being African-American, but her embrace covered anyone she thought of as a victim. "She was very committed to the community," said her brother, Frederick B. Phillips, a prominent Washington-based psychologist and social worker. "She was very committed to those she felt had experienced negative impact from society.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Saddled with escalating debt and declining enrollment, Cheyney University - the nation's first college for black people - is in dire straits that will worsen unless the state takes "drastic action" to rescue the school, the state auditor general said Wednesday. The school's expenses exceeded its revenue in four of the last five years, and its deficit, already $12 million, will grow by an additional $5 million this academic year, Auditor General Eugene DePasquale said in a report.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|