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SPORTS
October 17, 2015 | Adam Hermann, Inquirer Staff Writer
When you run the ball as well as Northeast, there's no sense in throwing it. The Vikings ran 54 times for 436 yards Thursday in a 44-7 win at Lincoln in Public League AAAA Independence action. Running back Amir Paulk finished with 19 carries for 101 yards and two touchdowns, and added a 75-yard kick return. Quarterback Keith Moore finished with 14 carries for 155 yards and a 54-yard touchdown. Catholic League. DeAndre Swift of St. Joseph Prep was named the U.S. Army All-American Bowl High School player of the week.
NEWS
September 1, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fifty-three thousand people packed Lincoln Financial Field on Sunday night, and it wasn't for the Birds. It was for North Philadelphia-born and raised comedian Kevin Hart, who became, according to his people, the first stand-up comedian to sell out a football stadium. The show was the culmination of Hart's What Now Tour, which has been called the most successful comedy tour in history. Hart's jaunt began in April, and included three sold-out shows at Madison Square Garden among other storied halls.
NEWS
August 11, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kaukab Siddique doesn't regret calling Pamela Geller and like-minded anti-Muslim commentators "dirty Jewish Zionist thugs. " "I would say it again," the Lincoln University associate professor of English said defiantly. Geller, Siddique said, committed the equivalent of "cultural genocide" by running a contest that encouraged people to draw cartoons of the prophet Muhammad. "She did the worst, other than killing us," he said of Geller, whose group, the American Freedom Defense Initiative, is labeled an anti-Muslim hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A longtime Lincoln University professor drew ire from Pennsylvania officials in 2010 when he called for the destruction of Israel and questioned whether the Holocaust ever happened. But Kaukab Siddique, a 72-year-old associate professor of English, kept his job. Now he's mouthing off again. "Don't be scared of these dirty Jewish Zionist White Supremacist thugs," he wrote in a Facebook post in May. Earlier this month he wondered why it took Bill Cosby's accusers so long to come forward.
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
Lincoln, like Cadillac, has been taking steps recently to make its machinery a more relevant member of the luxury segment. Certainly, the efforts to bump up the sales of products from the newly named Lincoln Motor Co. won't be hurt by the latest J.D. Power initial quality study. That influential report has Lincoln in the top 10 - and ahead of Lexus. The healthy sales of the MKC, Lincoln's new-for-2015 compact crossover, haven't hurt, either. Indeed, the MKC is a principal reason for Lincoln's recent sales increases, said Sam Locricchio, the automaker's product spokesman.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in the South, Wilford "Will" Fuller, 44, who now commands a hefty salary as head of several divisions of Lincoln Financial Group, worked in a dye house, shoveling athletic socks into bleach vats. "We'd throw them into these big walk-in dryers," Fuller said. "We'd step into the dryer in hundred-degree heat and pitchfork" them out. Fuller now runs Lincoln's $124 billion annuity division and leads the entire company's sales operation, distributing Lincoln's retirement products through finance companies and advisers.
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Through an open door came the sound of labored, heavy breathing and groans as President Abraham Lincoln lay dying from a gunshot wound to the head. First lady Mary Todd Lincoln passed from the room into a hallway, moaning with inconsolable grief, "O, my God, and have I given my husband to die?" The long death vigil at the Petersen House in Washington unfolded before James Tanner, who'd been summoned to record the testimony of witnesses to the assassination at Ford's Theatre. Though not widely known, Tanner's shorthand and transcribed cursive from the night of April 14, 1865, and morning of April 15, 1865, survived and are kept in an acid-free box in a vault at the Union League of Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Universal Pasteurization Co. L.L.C., a Lincoln, Neb., provider of cold-storage and outsourced food-processing services, will spend $10.8 million to open a facility in East Whiteland Township, Chester County, Gov. Wolf said Tuesday. Pennsylvania economic-development officials offered the company incentives including $102,000 in Job Creation Tax Credits and a $22,950 Workforce and Economic Development Network of Pennsylvania grant to train its staff, which is expected to number at least 51. Universal Pasteurization specializes in high-pressure processing, a cold pasteurization technique in which foods already in their final packages, such as lunch meats, fresh-cut fruits, and deli salads, are subjected to high water pressure to extend shelf life.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Along hundreds of miles of railroad tracks, mourners stood silently, reverently, as a doleful whistle and wisps of smoke and steam announced the approaching funeral train. Many wept and bowed their heads as it passed. In towns where the locomotive stopped, thousands surged forward, pushing and jostling to get a better view. Bands played melancholy tunes and preachers offered up solemn prayers. They focused on a dark maroon railcar, swathed in black crepe, carrying the martyred Abraham Lincoln, who had come on another train four years earlier to tell throngs at Independence Hall that he'd "rather be assassinated on this spot than surrender" the country.
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Someone spray-painted the N-word on a sign at the entrance of Lincoln University overnight, according to a message sent to the university community Thursday morning. Public safety officers at the university in Chester County discovered the graffiti on its northwest corner entrance sign at 1:50 a.m., and the word was gone later Thursday morning, officials said. "This incident is a sober reminder that our forebearers persevered in the face of hatred and intimidation, yet achieved and maintained standards for excellence which Lincoln University has become known," acting president Valerie I. Harrison told the university community.
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