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Lincoln

NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Having written orchestral works that contemplate the essence of rivers and oceans, Pulitzer Prize-winning composer John Luther Adams is heading toward the source of it all, with an hour-long piece so expansive it can't be contained by a typical concert hall - and can only go outdoors. Sila: The Breath of the World contemplates the force behind all of nature. (The title is the Inuit name of the abstract deity behind wind, rain, and life.) Friday and Saturday in New York, as part of the Mostly Mozart and Lincoln Center Out of Doors festivals, the piece will bring together, in Hearst Plaza outside Lincoln Center, the Philadelphia chamber choir the Crossing, the JACK Quartet, and any number of other contemporary-music mainstays.
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brick buildings, some dating back to the 1800s, line the main street of the campus of Lincoln University, a school that has produced a Supreme Court justice, a leader of the Harlem Renaissance, and two presidents of African nations. For a group of alumni, those buildings are historic emblems of the first degree-granting African American institution in the nation. For the school's administration, they are structures that may pose a financial hardship during tough budgetary times.
NEWS
June 17, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The story of Lincoln University's beginnings routinely highlights the benevolent white Presbyterian minister who founded the first degree-granting institution for African Americans. The Rev. John Miller Dickey started the historically black university in Chester County. James Ralston Amos and his brother, Thomas Henry Amos, were students, among the first to graduate. But in a retelling that shakes up a 160-year history, Cheryl ReneƩ Gooch, a dean at the school, elevates the Amos brothers' contribution.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ & CINDY STANSBURY, Daily News Staff Writers madejp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
PAULETTE WALLACE sat in her home in West Philly's Carroll Park section, watching "Wheel of Fortune. " Her couch was draped with her son's Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity blanket. Framed photos of friends and relatives lined the shelves and walls. Her phone was ringing off the hook. "Stop crying," Wallace, 65, told a friend on the other end. "It's going to be OK. " The endless phone calls yesterday were about her son, Donald Wallace, 39, who was charged Tuesday with terroristic threats and creating false public alarm near the Lincoln Tunnel after he allegedly called 9-1-1 to alert police that a sniper was on his way to New York.
SPORTS
March 23, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer
HERSHEY - Sometimes the harder you squeeze, the more it slips away. Math, Civics and Sciences Charter can attest after it surrendered two double-digits leads in yesterday's 70-66 loss to Lincoln Park in the Class A state final at the Giant Center. The Mighty Elephants (15-15) were led by a sensational Samir Doughty, who scored 26 points on 12-for-19 shooting. However, when the 6-4 junior guard headed for the bench with four fouls and his team leading, 57-51, with 7:52 left in the final frame, MC&S struggled to maintain its grip.
SPORTS
March 7, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
CLEARWATER, Fla. - The Phillies were up by one run. There were two runners on and five outs separating them from a win over the Atlanta Braves. Antonio Bastardo already had been in and out of the game and Mike Adams was unavailable, still working his way back from July shoulder surgery. Jake Diekman, possibly the most lethal arm in the 'pen, was being taken out after allowing two of the three batters he faced to reach base. Ryne Sandberg called on righthander Brad Lincoln in the eighth inning of yesterday afternoon's game at Bright House Field.
SPORTS
February 26, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Brad Lincoln spent the first week of December hunting with friends some 90 minutes north of Pittsburgh, the city where he once imagined a fruitful major-league career as a starting pitcher. Those dreams were dashed in 2012 with a trade to Toronto, and now Blue Jays general manager Alex Anthopoulos was on the phone. "When you get a call from your GM at midnight on a Tuesday in the offseason," Lincoln said, "you've either been released or something has happened. " Lincoln was traded to the Phillies, where a muddled bullpen is his benefit.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Eagles are bringing some of the living room to Lincoln Financial Field. As part of its $125 million revitalization of the stadium, team officials said Wednesday, they are putting $25 million worth of high-definition TV displays, including two huge video walls in both end zones, into the 11-year-old stadium. The team also will install 2,000 linear feet of digital "ribbon boards" between seating levels for out-of-town NFL scores and fantasy football statistics, and 1,200 wall-mounted TVs on the concourses and other areas.
SPORTS
January 30, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
SCORERS dream of basking in its glow. Its power is great but proves elusive for most because only the trustworthy are granted control. Abraham Lincoln senior guard Raymond Fred said he was deemed worthy yesterday and used it to score 30 points in the Railsplitters' 78-73 takedown of visiting Northeast High. "It was out of hand, to be honest," Fred said, laughing. "In the second half, coach just gave me the green light, so I tried to make things happen. " Fred finished 11-for-16 from the field with two assists and two steals.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
DJS Associates Inc., a 25-employee Abington firm that laser-scans accident scenes and building collapses for insurers and plaintiffs' lawyers, is stepping up its game. A four-person DJS crew will begin Monday the giant task of laser-scanning the Lincoln Memorial. The eventual three-dimensional digital image - the merging of 400 individual scans - will be accurate to within a quarter-inch of the physical monument in Washington, the firm says. The pro bono project is being done in conjunction with the National Park Service and the nonprofit organization CyArk, based in Oakland, Calif.
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