CollectionsLincoln
IN THE NEWS

Lincoln

NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
  A state audit of Lincoln University has been moved up because of comments made by the college's president on what he viewed as false allegations of sexual assault on the school's Chester County campus. Auditor General Eugene DePasquale announced the move-up on Wednesday. DePasquale said he had watched a video of the comments made by Robert R. Jennings, Lincoln's president, and sought to put school officials "on notice that we are coming in. " "To be blunt I considered them disturbing," DePasquale said of the remarks.
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The president of Lincoln University on Tuesday issued an apology for remarks he made in September at an all-women's convocation that some interpreted as blaming women for sexual assault. "My message was intended to emphasize personal responsibility and mutual respect," Lincoln president Robert R. Jennings wrote to the student body. "I apologize for my choice of words. I certainly did not intend to hurt or offend anyone. " His comments come two days after The Inquirer reported that Jennings had told an auditorium full of female students: "We have, we had, on this campus last semester three cases of young women who after having done whatever they did with young men and then it didn't turn out the way they wanted it to turn out, guess what they did?
NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Citing falling enrollment, sluggish fund-raising, and a turnover in staff, the faculty union at Lincoln University this week took a vote of no confidence in the school's president, according to several people with knowledge of the matter. The vote came about five months after the university's alumni association voted no confidence in Robert R. Jennings, who has presided over the historically black university since January 2012. "Overall," said Robert Ingram, president of the 700-member alumni association, "there's a loss of confidence in his ability to lead the university at a very critical time for colleges and universities in America" - especially historically black colleges and universities.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lincoln University's promise got Aitza Hedgemond's attention: The incoming freshman's annual tuition would remain at $11,836 all four years, guaranteed. It was one factor that led Hedgemond to select Lincoln, a historically black university in rural Chester County, over several other schools. "I don't have to worry about tuition going up," said Hedgemond, 18, of Burlington, who received some scholarship money but is paying for the rest herself. "I don't have to take out extra loans.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
In one gray box is a 1778 letter written by George Washington at Valley Forge. The flowing cursive wasn't particularly eloquent, but showed the minutia he tackled during the Revolution. Washington asked the New York governor for help tracking down an American officer who had confiscated a money box from the British at Princeton, then apparently converted it "to his own use. " In another box is a 1865 letter written by Abraham Lincoln to a woman who asked the president to send her a portion of his second inaugural address - in his own hand.
SPORTS
August 4, 2014 | By Tim McManus, Inquirer Staff Writer
AS Roma made itself at home in Philadelphia this past week while Inter Milan camped in Washington. The Giallorossi climbed the Art Museum steps and posed like Rocky. They held semisecret training sessions just off the Schuylkill Expressway at Penn's Rhodes Field. Charismatic manager Rudi Garcia held court at the Ritz- Carlton. The home advantage, however, did not extend to game day. Inter spoiled the party with a 2-0 victory in front of 12,169 at Lincoln Financial Field. The barnstorming clubs from Italy's Serie A met as part of the International Champions Cup. Both teams were eliminated from the tournament later in the day when Manchester United beat Real Madrid.
SPORTS
July 28, 2014 | BY ANDREW ALBERT, Daily News Staff Writer alberta@phillynews.com
IN FEBRUARY 2012, the Eagles started the process of revitalizing Lincoln Financial Field to give fans a better in game experience. More than 2 1/2 years and $125 million later, the renovations are "99 percent complete," according to team president Don Smolenski. All of the work will be done before the Eagles' home opener on Sept. 7 against Jacksonville. The in-game experience at the Linc, which opened in 2003, will be much more modern, an upgrade that was much needed, Smolenski said.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Having written orchestral works that contemplate the essence of rivers and oceans, Pulitzer Prize-winning composer John Luther Adams is heading toward the source of it all, with an hour-long piece so expansive it can't be contained by a typical concert hall - and can only go outdoors. Sila: The Breath of the World contemplates the force behind all of nature. (The title is the Inuit name of the abstract deity behind wind, rain, and life.) Friday and Saturday in New York, as part of the Mostly Mozart and Lincoln Center Out of Doors festivals, the piece will bring together, in Hearst Plaza outside Lincoln Center, the Philadelphia chamber choir the Crossing, the JACK Quartet, and any number of other contemporary-music mainstays.
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brick buildings, some dating back to the 1800s, line the main street of the campus of Lincoln University, a school that has produced a Supreme Court justice, a leader of the Harlem Renaissance, and two presidents of African nations. For a group of alumni, those buildings are historic emblems of the first degree-granting African American institution in the nation. For the school's administration, they are structures that may pose a financial hardship during tough budgetary times.
NEWS
June 17, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The story of Lincoln University's beginnings routinely highlights the benevolent white Presbyterian minister who founded the first degree-granting institution for African Americans. The Rev. John Miller Dickey started the historically black university in Chester County. James Ralston Amos and his brother, Thomas Henry Amos, were students, among the first to graduate. But in a retelling that shakes up a 160-year history, Cheryl Reneé Gooch, a dean at the school, elevates the Amos brothers' contribution.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|