CollectionsLindback Award
IN THE NEWS

Lindback Award

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 3, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
Tara Ann Carter had planned to become a college professor, but thanks to a confluence of unexpected events, she is happily teaching English and African American history to ninth graders at the Hill-Freedman World Academy in West Oak Lane. Winnie Kwan, a Chinese immigrant and South Philadelphia High School grad studied engineering, but has found her niche teaching students at an alternative school in West Philadelphia. And after a career in the business world, John McGlaughlin decided to use his skills to teach math at Murrell Dobbins Career and Technical High School in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 19, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
During her five years as principal at Lankenau Environmental Science Magnet High School, Karen Dean has stressed academics and the importance of going to college. The veteran administrator also has encouraged staff and students to build partnerships with groups and businesses in the school's Upper Roxborough neighborhood and beyond. Those relationships and Dean's ability to delegate tasks paid dividends after vandals destroyed parts of the school's nearly 17-acre campus in February, including students' gardens.
NEWS
April 25, 1989 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five faculty members at Temple University yesterday were named winners of the school's 1989 Great Teacher Awards, which are given annually for outstanding teaching. The awards, which are decided by a faculty committee, carry a cash prize of $10,000 for each winner. "It's one of the greatest thrills of my life," said award winner Edwin Gordon, a professor at Temple's Esther Boyer College of Music. "I am shocked because I never think of myself as outstanding. I just do my work and get very involved in it. " Gordon, a music psychologist who focuses on how people learn music, said he planned to donate his prize money to the Gordon Institute for Music Learning, a nonprofit research center he plans to establish to study how young children acquire musical skills.
NEWS
January 6, 1991 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial service was held yesterday for mathematician John C. Oxtoby, 80, author of the landmark work Measure and Category and professor emeritus of mathematics at Bryn Mawr College. "He was really dedicated to his work in mathematics," said Mr. Oxtoby's wife of more than 45 years, Jean, whom he met while he was a professor and she his student at Bryn Mawr. "It was a seven-day-a-week occupation; he loved thinking mathematically. " Mr. Oxtoby died Wednesday at his Haverford home.
NEWS
November 18, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jane Mills Glick, 65, of Swarthmore, a biochemist, died Sunday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania of head trauma from a fall in her home. From 2002 until she retired in May 2008, Dr. Glick was faculty administrator of the Cell and Molecular Biology (CAMB) graduate program at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Previously, she was director of education in the gene-therapy program at Penn for eight years, and also associate professor in cell and molecular biology.
NEWS
April 29, 1990 | By Monica L. Williams, Special to The Inquirer
Dawn B. Marks is one of five Temple University faculty members who received a "Great Teacher Award" and $10,000 from the university last week. Marks, a resident of Plymouth Meeting, is an associate professor of biochemistry and assistant dean for graduate studies at Temple's School of Medicine. She has earned a national reputation for developing innovative techniques to teach biochemistry and molecular biology. In the laboratory, her major research interest deals with the regulation of protein levels in the cell.
NEWS
February 1, 1995 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William Sherman Perry, 65, a retired professor and former director of the affirmative action office at Temple University, died Thursday of lung cancer at his home in Center City. Mr. Perry joined the faculty at Temple in 1970. Later he was appointed chairman of the School of Social Administration's department of social welfare and, in the early 1980s, became head of the affirmative action office. Mr. Perry taught social work at Smith College during the summer. In 1973, he was appointed a Danforth Associate in recognition of his excellence as a teacher.
NEWS
January 26, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Kaczmarczik, 86, of Huntingdon Valley, a physics teacher at Drexel University for 37 years, died of coronary artery disease Tuesday at Abington Memorial Hospital. Mr. Kaczmarczik grew up near Seventh and Brown Streets in the Northern Liberties section of the city. He was president of his graduating class at Central High School, his son Paul M. said, and earned his bachelor's degree in physics from Drexel in 1948 and his master's in electrical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 1952.
NEWS
August 16, 2011
J. Richard Houston, 76, of Bala Cynwyd, a professor of physics at St. Joseph's University for more than 50 years, died of cancer Thursday, Aug. 11, at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse in Center City. Dr. Houston grew up in Chester and Ridley Park, and graduated from St. James High School in Chester. After earning a bachelor's degree from St. Joe's in 1958, he was invited to teach a class. He did not even have to fill out an application, said his daughter, Catherine Dougherty. When he joined the faculty, St. Joe's was an all-male college, and he remained when it transitioned to a coed university.
NEWS
March 26, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph F. Ford, 85, who taught accounting at Drexel University for almost 40 years, died of cancer Tuesday at White Horse Village, a retirement community in Newtown Square. In 1987, two years after his retirement, Professor Ford was honored by Drexel for his accomplishments as "an exceptional teacher and innovator," with the endowment of the Joseph F. Ford Professorship in Accounting. Professor Ford joined the faculty at Drexel, his alma mater, in 1946. He was director of the business graduate program in the 1950s and from 1970 to 1971 was acting dean of the business college.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 3, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
Tara Ann Carter had planned to become a college professor, but thanks to a confluence of unexpected events, she is happily teaching English and African American history to ninth graders at the Hill-Freedman World Academy in West Oak Lane. Winnie Kwan, a Chinese immigrant and South Philadelphia High School grad studied engineering, but has found her niche teaching students at an alternative school in West Philadelphia. And after a career in the business world, John McGlaughlin decided to use his skills to teach math at Murrell Dobbins Career and Technical High School in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 19, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
During her five years as principal at Lankenau Environmental Science Magnet High School, Karen Dean has stressed academics and the importance of going to college. The veteran administrator also has encouraged staff and students to build partnerships with groups and businesses in the school's Upper Roxborough neighborhood and beyond. Those relationships and Dean's ability to delegate tasks paid dividends after vandals destroyed parts of the school's nearly 17-acre campus in February, including students' gardens.
NEWS
May 13, 2015
The following excerpts are from the nominations submitted to the Lindback Foundation for the winning Philadelphia School District high school teachers. These teachers will be honored Tuesday at the Prince Theater. Michael Ames Science Leadership Academy A special education teacher for 15 years, Ames believes that project-based learning is uniquely suited to meet the needs of all students.   Russell Benditt Philadelphia Military Academy Benditt, a social studies teacher and athletic director, is passionate about working with students in urban schools.
NEWS
May 7, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham and Julie Xie, Inquirer Staff Writers
Khalifah Bennett calls on her own experiences growing up in a tough Philadelphia neighborhood to show her pupils what they can do with their lives. Students know they can go to Michael Johnson, a gay MIT grad, for help with physics - and life. Ambra Hook uses real-world principles to make learning come alive for the children she teaches science and engineering. They are three of the 55 Philadelphia School District high school teachers being honored Tuesday as some of the city's best.
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward G. Sutula, 92, of Drexel Hill, professor emeritus of accounting at St. Joseph's University, died Tuesday, Nov. 27, of pneumonia at Sunrise of Haverford. Mr. Sutula spent 40 years on the faculty at St. Joseph's before retiring in 1990. From 1950 to 1972, he was also an adjunct professor at Villanova University. He taught more than 4,800 students whose lives he touched and influenced, his son Thomas said. "Ed knew each student's name, even sometimes their parents', some aspect of their background, and was the go-to person when promising students wanted to seek the best jobs," said a colleague, Joseph M. Ragan.
NEWS
November 21, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Morris Hamburg, 89, of Society Hill, emeritus professor of statistics and operations research at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, died of strokes Monday, Nov. 14, at Bryn Mawr Terrace. Dr. Hamburg began teaching at Wharton in 1946 while earning his doctorate in economics. Though he joked that the lecture system was "the mysterious process by which the notes of the professor are transferred to the notes of the student without passing through the minds of either," he was an enthusiastic teacher, said his son, Neil.
NEWS
August 16, 2011
J. Richard Houston, 76, of Bala Cynwyd, a professor of physics at St. Joseph's University for more than 50 years, died of cancer Thursday, Aug. 11, at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse in Center City. Dr. Houston grew up in Chester and Ridley Park, and graduated from St. James High School in Chester. After earning a bachelor's degree from St. Joe's in 1958, he was invited to teach a class. He did not even have to fill out an application, said his daughter, Catherine Dougherty. When he joined the faculty, St. Joe's was an all-male college, and he remained when it transitioned to a coed university.
NEWS
March 5, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nina Williams Hillman, 78, an award-winning teacher and administrator at Temple University from 1976 until she retired in 2006, died of lymphoma on Saturday, Feb. 19, at Temple University Hospital. She was chairman of the biology department from 1984 to 1987, vice provost for the sciences from 1991 to 1994, and director of the College of Science and Technology from 1999 to 2006, according to a resumé supplied by her family. In the 1983-84 academic year, she was one of six Temple faculty members who won a Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching from the Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation of Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 1, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brother Hugh Albright, 82, a retired professor of mathematics and former dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at La Salle University, died of heart failure Thursday, Feb. 24, at Chestnut Hill Hospital. He was a resident of Mount Airy. Brother Albright was born in Jerusalem, where his father, William, a prominent archaeologist, was excavating an ancient site. His father was also an expert on Semitic languages, and his mother, Ruth, had a doctorate in Sanskrit languages. Brother Albright attended a Christian Brothers school in Maryland and joined the religious order at age 18. He professed his final vows when he was 25. He earned a bachelor's degree in mathematics from Catholic University of America and graduated summa cum laude in 1953.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|