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Linguine

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012
Salt 2 to 3 ounces linguine 1 teaspoon butter 2 scallions, sliced fairly thin A splash of vodka 2 or 3 slices smoked salmon 3 to 4 tablespoons heavy cream Freshly ground pepper 1 teaspoon capers, rinsed Parsley   1. Cook linguine according to package directions, adding salt to water. While linguine is boiling, melt the butter in a small wok or medium skillet. Toss in the scallions and saute gently for one minute, stirring.
FOOD
January 28, 2010 | By Linda Gassenheimer, McClatchy Newspapers
In this hearty vegetarian dish, a takeoff on traditional eggplant parmesan, meaty portobello mushrooms are dressed in a rich tomato sauce and covered with mozzarella and Parmesan cheese. The entree ingredients are placed in a skillet and cooked in eight minutes. The side dish is made with whole-wheat linguine. It can be found fresh or dried. Either works well here.   Portobello Parmesan 1. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the mushrooms and sprinkle with the oregano and salt and pepper to taste.
FOOD
May 31, 2007 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
Stir-fries and pasta dishes are both popular ways for cooks to turn out quick and easy meals. This Chinese-style stir-fry made with refrigerated pasta combines the two economically with an Asian twist. Pork Lo Mein Makes 4 servings 1. Trim fat from pork. Cut the meat with grain into 1-by-2-inch strips, then cut across grain into 1/8-inch slices. (Pork will be easier to cut if partially frozen.) 2. Remove strings from pea pods. 3. In a 3-quart saucepan, heat 2 quarts water to boiling.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2003 | By JON CAROULIS For the Daily News
On a summer night long ago, the woman I should have married and I went to a restaurant in her apartment building at 47th and Pine. Not far from where we sat, a cook prepared a pasta dish I've tried to replicate but never equaled (much the same way I've never met anyone to replicate who I was with that night, but that's another sad story). The cook whipped up a linguini dish made with plum tomatoes, fresh garlic and grated Parmesan cheese. But the key ingredient might have been the electric fry pan he used, combining three ingredients in the hot oil in the pan to make the linguini taste like Italy on a summer afternoon.
FOOD
August 12, 1992 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Nothing for Dinner is our name for a delectable clam and pasta entree thought up during a commute home one recent day. It happened this way: "What's for dinner?" asked the driver of his wife, the passenger. "Nothing," was her answer. The refrigerator was almost empty. The freezer held only big roasts that would take too long to thaw. Then she remembered the canned clams in the pantry. And the package of linguine. There was a newly bought supply of oil-cured olives. And hadn't she just seen a small jar of marinated artichoke hearts in the vicinity of the canned clams?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1987 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Louie Linguini, an Italian offspring of Rib-It, has made his debut. The opening took place last week at 104 Chestnut St., and Louie is already demonstrating that he can offer "real" food at fast-food prices. Louie's surrogate father is Paul Rimmier, the originator of the Rib-It restaurants. Rimmier is something like the old-time medicine man, but even better. He gives you all the fun, trappings and humorous hype, but unlike the medicine man, he also gives you the remedy. At Louie Linguini - just as at Rib-It - the remedy is a cure for the high cost of dining out. Lunchtime specials are as low as $2.95 for lasagna.
FOOD
June 14, 1989 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Barbara Kafka's Food for Friends (Harper & Row, $10.95) is as relevant today as when it won the prestigious Tastemaker award when the hardback version was issued in 1984. If anything, its emphasis on time-saving recipes looms even larger these days. And the new paperback's format makes it easy to handle and read. Kafka's reputation for originality is widely accepted in the food world. She is known for explaining classic recipes and challenging accepted techniques. In Food for Friends, she cuts through complex and time-consuming preparation methods to make home entertaining as painless as possible.
FOOD
November 21, 1993 | By Rena Coyle, FOR THE INQUIRER
As your child matures into a teenager, he or she is probably feeling very grown-up. But along with this new sense of maturity and authority comes a lot of anxiousness and insecurity. One way to help your growing child deal with these personal stresses is to let him or her feel in control, one small task at a time. Cooking is a great way for a child to gain back some self-confidence and treat a few good friends to a very special evening. Pasta dishes are always a perfect choice for this age group to cook: The teenagers enjoy cooking it as well as eating it. To make a simple pasta dish seem a little more grown-up, this recipe for linguine pairs it with a hearty red clam sauce.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1997 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Good news for those who frequent Penn's Landing and eventually find themselves searching for basic, reasonably priced fare: Schooner Tavern & Restaurant is now out of dry dock. This onetime popular eatery on Front Street, two blocks south of South, had been out of commission for a year or so. Now its tiny galley is back and serving fundamental but quality food in generous portions at some very reasonable prices. So if you're in the mood for nothing more elaborate than soup, chili, pizza, sandwiches, and a few entrees, you should find contentment here.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
April 24, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
"Shrimp!" called out Angelica Marrero, 10, raising her fists in celebration as she entered the kitchen. She and her classmates at Sacred Heart School in Camden had been looking forward to this cooking lesson: shrimp with lemon garlic linguine. "I'm so excited for shrimp," she said. The students had flipped ahead in their cookbooks to see what recipes they would be making during the eight-week healthy-cooking class, and this was the one they were all waiting for. Last week, when Bryson Barnes, 10, said his mom made the dish with broccoli instead of peas, the other students wished for broccoli, too. So the volunteers, Ruth Biemer and Sylvia Wilson, two retired elementary-school teachers with decades of experience, taught the children a lesson before the class even started: A recipe need not be followed to the letter.
FOOD
October 11, 2012 | By Anna Pan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The increased popularity of cooking shows has paved the way for adventurous theaters to put on plays that experiment with food prep as live entertainment. Cooking serves as the way of life in Cooking with the Calamari Sisters , a comedically chaotic "live broadcast" of a cooking show at the Society Hill Playhouse. And a young couple in love bonds while making linguine on stage in a new musical adaptation of Love Story at the Walnut Street Theatre. If juggling love is one thing, juggling lyrics, melodies, and pasta ingredients in a live performance is quite another.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012
Salt 2 to 3 ounces linguine 1 teaspoon butter 2 scallions, sliced fairly thin A splash of vodka 2 or 3 slices smoked salmon 3 to 4 tablespoons heavy cream Freshly ground pepper 1 teaspoon capers, rinsed Parsley   1. Cook linguine according to package directions, adding salt to water. While linguine is boiling, melt the butter in a small wok or medium skillet. Toss in the scallions and saute gently for one minute, stirring.
FOOD
May 5, 2011 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Here is a new twist on the classic mussels with linguine. This recipe, from the new seafood cookbook For Cod and Country (Sterling Epicure) adds pine nuts and orange to the mix for a surprisingly bright and interesting touch.   Linguine with Mussels, Pine Nuts and Orange 3 pounds mussels, scrubbed and debearded (discard any that won't close) 1 cup white wine 1 pound linguine Salt 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 2 cloves garlic, sliced 1 cup pine nuts Juice and grated zest of 1 orange Leaves from 1/2 bunch fresh flat-leaf parsley (about 2 cups loosely packed)
FOOD
January 28, 2010 | By Linda Gassenheimer, McClatchy Newspapers
In this hearty vegetarian dish, a takeoff on traditional eggplant parmesan, meaty portobello mushrooms are dressed in a rich tomato sauce and covered with mozzarella and Parmesan cheese. The entree ingredients are placed in a skillet and cooked in eight minutes. The side dish is made with whole-wheat linguine. It can be found fresh or dried. Either works well here.   Portobello Parmesan 1. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the mushrooms and sprinkle with the oregano and salt and pepper to taste.
NEWS
June 16, 2004 | By Jessica Pressler FOR THE INQUIRER
Time was, Washington Township was a place where food was grown. Then along came the folks from the city, seeking peace and country space - a house big enough for a large famiglia, a backyard for barbecuing, maybe some room left over for a couple of marble cherubs on the lawn. Now Washington Township is a place where people go to eat, the dominant taste being Italian with a bit of country thrown in as a nod to the past. Bakeries are filled with soccer moms ordering trays of cannolis; commuters duck in for a quick slice of Sicilian pizza; out-of-towners purchase bags of cider donuts; and lines of teenagers snake around the Jersey version of Oregon Avenue's Pop's Water Ice (856-218-1078)
NEWS
June 16, 2004 | By Jessica Pressler FOR THE INQUIRER
Time was, Washington Township was a place where food was grown. Then along came the folks from the city, seeking peace and country space - a house big enough for a large famiglia, a backyard for barbecuing, maybe some room left over for a couple of marble cherubs on the lawn. Now Washington Township is a place where people go to eat, the dominant taste being Italian with a bit of country thrown in as a nod to the past. Bakeries are filled with soccer moms ordering trays of cannolis; commuters duck in for a quick slice of Sicilian pizza; out-of-towners purchase bags of cider donuts; and lines of teenagers snake around the Jersey version of Oregon Avenue's Pop's Water Ice (856-218-1078)
NEWS
March 7, 2004 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Chick's Tavern is the only eatery I know where a meal is not complete without a plastic bucket on the table. On my visit, the dull thuds of tossed mussel shells soon gave away to sharp clicks - sort of like the snapping sounds of castanets - as the bucket filled. At this third-generation family restaurant, mussels are served two ways: by themselves or heaped on a bed of linguine. Either way, they're served with red or white sauce and placed in a dish the size of a punch bowl.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2003 | By JON CAROULIS For the Daily News
On a summer night long ago, the woman I should have married and I went to a restaurant in her apartment building at 47th and Pine. Not far from where we sat, a cook prepared a pasta dish I've tried to replicate but never equaled (much the same way I've never met anyone to replicate who I was with that night, but that's another sad story). The cook whipped up a linguini dish made with plum tomatoes, fresh garlic and grated Parmesan cheese. But the key ingredient might have been the electric fry pan he used, combining three ingredients in the hot oil in the pan to make the linguini taste like Italy on a summer afternoon.
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