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Liposuction

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NEWS
August 8, 2001 | By Susan FitzGerald and Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A King of Prussia plastic surgeon has voluntarily agreed to stop performing liposuction and other surgical procedures in his office while officials investigate whether his facility required a state license, a state Health Department spokesman said yesterday. The state began an investigation into the office licensing of Richard P. Glunk's cosmetic surgery practice after receiving a complaint about the death of an 18-year-old girl who had liposuction at Glunk's office on May 23. Amy Fledderman, a Pennsylvania State University student from Newtown Square, Delaware County, died two days later of a complication of the liposuction.
NEWS
September 23, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Investigations into the cause of bacterial infections that killed one woman and hospitalized two others after liposuction procedures in Maryland have spilled into Pennsylvania and Delaware, with authorities Friday advising customers of Monarch Med Spas that they might have been exposed. Maryland health officials shut down the cosmetic-surgery center in Timonium, north of Baltimore, on Wednesday after an inspection raised concerns about infection-control procedures. Monarch's other four centers are in Philadelphia, King of Prussia, Harrisburg, and Greenville, Del. The Pennsylvania and Delaware health departments urged people who underwent procedures and have fever, infection, or prolonged redness of the wound site to contact their health providers.
NEWS
August 10, 2001 | By Susan FitzGerald and Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The Montgomery County District Attorney's Office has launched a criminal investigation into the death of an 18-year-old woman after she underwent liposuction in the office of a King of Prussia plastic surgeon. District Attorney Bruce L. Castor Jr. said yesterday that he had no evidence so far to suggest that criminal negligence occurred but that the unexpected nature of the death warranted investigation. Amy Fledderman, 18, of Newtown Square, Delaware County, died on May 25, two days after getting liposuction from Richard P. Glunk at his office near the King of Prussia mall.
NEWS
May 24, 2008 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia jury yesterday awarded a Delaware County couple $20.5 million in damages for the death of their 18-year-old daughter following a liposuction procedure. In a poignant twist, the verdict was announced on the seventh anniversary of the day Amy Fledderman, a Penn State freshman from Newtown Square, underwent the procedure that would to lead her death on May 25, 2001. Lawyers for the main defendant, Richard P. Glunk, a King of Prussia plastic surgeon, are expected to appeal.
NEWS
November 14, 2010 | By Jeff Shields, Inquirer Staff Writer
An appeals court has affirmed a jury's award of more than $20 million to the family of 18-year-old Amy Fledderman, the Pennsylvania State University freshman from Delaware County who died as a result of a liposuction operation in 2001. A three-judge panel of Pennsylvania Superior Court found Friday that the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas did not err on multiple fronts, as challenged on appeal by Richard P. Glunk, a King of Prussia plastic surgeon whose liability included $15 million in punitive damages after a five-week trial in 2008.
NEWS
April 20, 2002 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nearly a year after a Delaware County teenager died from liposuction performed in a doctor's office not licensed for surgery, Pennsylvania health officials are looking at more than 100 other doctors whose offices also may lack the necessary licensing. State regulations require doctors who do surgical procedures in their private offices to obtain licenses for an "ambulatory surgical facility. " Until the death last May of Amy Fledderman, 18, of Newtown Square, the rules went largely unnoticed and unenforced.
LIVING
October 6, 1999 | By Robert Strauss, FOR THE INQUIRER
Christopher Reitano was 44 and quite chipper most of the time, but he was always getting sympathy from people he met. "Do you have a cold? How are your allergies?" they would ask. Reitano was getting awfully self-conscious. "Basically, my eyes were baggy, especially on the upper eyelids. It was starting to get aggravating," said Reitano, who lives in Voorhees and is an international service manager for Siemens, the global electronics firm. "I decided to do something about it. " What Reitano did nearly four years ago is what a lot of baby-boom men are doing these days - heading for the plastic surgeon.
NEWS
September 30, 2001 | By Susan FitzGerald and Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
After the death of an 18-year-old woman who underwent liposuction in a private medical office, Pennsylvania health officials have moved to enforce a two-year-old licensing regulation that has gone largely unnoticed by many doctors and even state regulators. In November 1999, as the millions of procedures performed outside hospitals nationwide continued to grow, the Pennsylvania Department of Health updated its licensing regulations for "ambulatory surgical facilities. " That meant that large surgical centers, as well as doctors' offices where surgery was done, had to meet strict criteria to help ensure patient safety.
NEWS
September 22, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Investigations into the cause of bacterial infections that killed one woman and hospitalized two others after liposuction procedures in Maryland have spilled into Pennsylvania and Delaware, with authorities Friday advising customers of Monarch Med Spas that they might have been exposed. Maryland health officials shut down the cosmetic-surgery center in Timonium, north of Baltimore, on Wednesday after an inspection raised concerns about infection-control procedures. Monarch's other four centers are in Philadelphia, King of Prussia, Harrisburg, and Greenville, Del. The Pennsylvania and Delaware health departments urged people who underwent procedures and have fever, infection, or prolonged redness of the wound site to contact their health providers.
NEWS
October 8, 1991
SUBSCRIBE NOW! Is it true that scholars examining the Dead Sea Scrolls found small inserts between the pages urging readers to renew their subscriptions at half price? - Dick Goldberg, Los Angeles Daily Journal HELP THE CAUSE Sen. Arlen Specter says the confirmation of Clarence Thomas might help the Republican cause by bringing more African-Americans into the party. The confirmation of Robert Gates might bring in more sneaks and subversives - but the Republicans have a surplus of those already.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the last decade or so, thousands of "medical spas" have popped up around the country, enticing consumers with a name that suggests a surgeon's skill mixed with the pleasure of a massage. Few states license or inspect them, and they rarely seek accreditation. Any place can call itself a medical spa. Anybody can operate one. "There is a bit of a Wild West out there," said Leo McCafferty, a board-certified plastic surgeon in Pittsburgh who is president of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery.
NEWS
September 26, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania Health Department workers visited Monarch Med Spa in King of Prussia on Monday, the company said, but have not issued findings from the visit. Monarch's locations there and in Philadelphia, Harrisburg, and Greenville, Del., are being investigated after Maryland last week closed its other facility, in Timonium, north of Baltimore. The closure followed invasive group A streptococcus (GAS) infections in three women, one of them fatal, who underwent liposuction there. A Delaware Health Division spokeswoman said Monday that it had confirmed invasive GAS in one resident, no longer hospitalized, who had "a surgical" procedure at a Monarch location in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
September 23, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Investigations into the cause of bacterial infections that killed one woman and hospitalized two others after liposuction procedures in Maryland have spilled into Pennsylvania and Delaware, with authorities Friday advising customers of Monarch Med Spas that they might have been exposed. Maryland health officials shut down the cosmetic-surgery center in Timonium, north of Baltimore, on Wednesday after an inspection raised concerns about infection-control procedures. Monarch's other four centers are in Philadelphia, King of Prussia, Harrisburg, and Greenville, Del. The Pennsylvania and Delaware health departments urged people who underwent procedures and have fever, infection, or prolonged redness of the wound site to contact their health providers.
NEWS
September 22, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Investigations into the cause of bacterial infections that killed one woman and hospitalized two others after liposuction procedures in Maryland have spilled into Pennsylvania and Delaware, with authorities Friday advising customers of Monarch Med Spas that they might have been exposed. Maryland health officials shut down the cosmetic-surgery center in Timonium, north of Baltimore, on Wednesday after an inspection raised concerns about infection-control procedures. Monarch's other four centers are in Philadelphia, King of Prussia, Harrisburg, and Greenville, Del. The Pennsylvania and Delaware health departments urged people who underwent procedures and have fever, infection, or prolonged redness of the wound site to contact their health providers.
NEWS
September 30, 2011 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY - The latest casino promotion in Atlantic City gives new meaning to "going bust. " The Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort plans to give $25,000 worth of plastic surgery to the winner of a player's card contest. The lucky one can mix and match surgeries including breast enhancements, tummy tucks, liposuction and face-lifts, until the total hits $25,000. "We wanted to change the face of a typical casino promotion," said Kathleen McSweeney, senior vice president of marketing for Trump Entertainment Resorts.
NEWS
November 14, 2010 | By Jeff Shields, Inquirer Staff Writer
An appeals court has affirmed a jury's award of more than $20 million to the family of 18-year-old Amy Fledderman, the Pennsylvania State University freshman from Delaware County who died as a result of a liposuction operation in 2001. A three-judge panel of Pennsylvania Superior Court found Friday that the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas did not err on multiple fronts, as challenged on appeal by Richard P. Glunk, a King of Prussia plastic surgeon whose liability included $15 million in punitive damages after a five-week trial in 2008.
NEWS
May 24, 2008 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia jury yesterday awarded a Delaware County couple $20.5 million in damages for the death of their 18-year-old daughter following a liposuction procedure. In a poignant twist, the verdict was announced on the seventh anniversary of the day Amy Fledderman, a Penn State freshman from Newtown Square, underwent the procedure that would to lead her death on May 25, 2001. Lawyers for the main defendant, Richard P. Glunk, a King of Prussia plastic surgeon, are expected to appeal.
NEWS
November 21, 2004 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Belen Rodriguez asked the doctor to put it all behind her. Now she anxiously awaited to see if he had. As one of the patients selected for Extreme Makeover, ABC's hit reality show, Rodriguez had already undergone an eyebrow lift, nose refinement, lip augmentation and chin liposuction at the skilled hands of plastic surgeon Anthony C. Griffin. Her new face thrilled her. Now, within the confines of Griffin's Beverly Hills office, it was time for Rodriguez to see the rest of the package.
NEWS
June 17, 2004 | Daily News wire services
Drunken driver jailed; killed 1979 U.S. embassy hostage A man was sentenced yesterday to two years for a drunken driving crash in Dedham, Mass., that killed a former U.S. embassy worker in Iran who spent 444 as a hostage in 1979. Richard C. Clinch, 24, rear-ended a pickup truck driven by Malcolm Kalp, 63, who was pronounced dead at the scene. Kalp was listed as the U.S. Embassy's commercial officer when he and 65 others were taken hostage on Nov. 4, 1979. His captors claimed he worked for the CIA. Kalp tried to escape three times, and was beaten and held in solitary confinement.
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