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Lippincott

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BUSINESS
May 22, 1990 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. Ltd., trying to lighten a heavy debt load, yesterday announced the sale of a Philadelphia publishing company and was said to be considering the sale of Radnor-based TV Guide. J.B. Lippincott, a publisher of medical textbooks and journals with headquarters on Washington Square, is being sold to a Dutch company for $250 million in cash because of "a need to reduce the debt," said Robert L. Biewen, group vice president of the News Corp. unit that owned it. A spokesman for Murdoch's magazine organization, meanwhile, said there was "not a whit, not a whisper of truth" in a report by the trade journal Advertising Age that TV Guide was being put up for sale.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1992 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
The "best-sellers" at the venerable Philadelphia publishing house of J. B. Lippincott bear names such as "Lippincott Manual of Nursing Practice," and "Fractures"- a three-volume work that sells for $400. The sexiest title on Lippincott's list is "The Journal of Sexually- Transmitted Diseases. " These are not the kinds of titles discussed on TV talk shows, nor the type to turn authors into celebrities. But specializing in the health sciences has enabled Lippincott to celebrate a profitable 200th anniversary this year.
NEWS
October 13, 2010 | By JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 856-779-3231
One man was a public-school teacher, heading home from his second job to his beloved wife, a "daddy's little girl" asleep in bed and an unborn daughter he never got to meet. The other man had just huffed an aerosol can of keyboard cleaner in a Burlington County Walmart, authorities said, before also hitting the road. When Ryan Lippincott's Ford Contour veered into oncoming traffic about 10 p.m. March 18, authorities said, it killed 27-year-old music teacher Jonathan Hinkson on impact.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1997 | By Andrea Gerlin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fort Knox it's not. But each week, hundreds of packets of dental debris arrive in the Wynnewood office of estate-jewelry buyer Lippincott Inc. Washing out of patients' mouths and flowing through the mail, the gold nuggets are the castoffs of the dental world. At Lippincott's office, two workers clean and sort the pieces, which are then shipped off to refineries around the country. The refineries melt and purify them into commercial-grade bricks for resale on the open market.
NEWS
December 31, 2013 | Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER COLUMNIST
The box arrived at Ted Nobles' house in Middletown, Del., two days before Christmas, and, for the longest time, he let it sit there, unopened. "I was overwhelmed," he says. The sender was an older man in Fresno, Calif., a vet who had served in the same part of Europe during World War II as Nobles' great-uncle Wally. For more than a decade, Nobles had been researching the history of his family, including his maternal grandmother's only sibling, Lt. Wallace Lippincott Jr. - a Chester-born Quaker from Swarthmore who after graduating from the University of Delaware went off to war, drove a tank into the Battle of the Bulge, and never returned.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernice Harris Heller, 91, an editor for medical publications, died June 21 at Stapeley, a retirement residence in Germantown. Born to Russian Jewish émigrés, Mrs. Heller graduated from Olney High School. She hoped to pursue a career as a concert pianist, but after her father died in 1942, she had to help support her family, said her daughter, Irene. During World War II, she worked for a company supplying the Army Signal Corps. In 1946, she married Louis Heller. While raising a family in West Philadelphia and Wynnefield, she helped establish music classes and a day camp at Memorial Hall in Fairmount Park.
BUSINESS
May 4, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
With net income down 26.7 percent for the first quarter of this year, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. said Thursday that it would close its Bucks County manufacturing plant in 2017. The plant is on Cathill Road in West Rockhill Township and has a Sellersville address. About 450 people work there, according to a company spokeswoman, down from 472 as of Dec. 31, 2012, as noted in Teva's 2012 annual report on file with the Securities and Exchange Commission. About 40 people were notified in April that they would lose their jobs because of reduced demand for products made at the plant, according to the spokeswoman.
NEWS
February 24, 1994 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
When a man wearing a woman's flowered dress and a black wig shot and killed her cousin right on her doorstep last year, Sharon Whaley decided her best chance to stay alive was to clam up. She did. She told police she didn't know who the killer was, even though she had dated the man accused of participating in the slaying. But yesterday, Whaley testified at a preliminary hearing for the man, Kevin Green, 35, of Diamond Street near 28th. She said Green urged the gunman to "Do it!
NEWS
May 16, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 79-year-old Lansdowne doctor known for his civic involvement has been arrested and charged with selling prescription drugs from his home office. Lenwood Boyer Wert of the 200 block of North Lansdowne Avenue prescribed Oxycodone and other painkillers on a cash-only basis, Delaware County District Attorney Jack Whelan said. "Dr. Wert is no different than a drug dealer standing on the corner. In fact, he's worse because he's operating under the guise of a medical professional," Whelan said at a news conference to announce the arrest.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wolters Kluwer Health, the U.S. medical publishing arm of the European-based Wolters Kluwer information-services group, is closing its Ambler office and relocating 119 employees to Center City or to work at home, spokesman Robert Dekker said. "The goal of the move is not to reduce head count, rather, providing a more collaborative work environment," Dekker said Monday. The company is adding 8,000 square feet to its Medical Research and Professional and Education offices on the fifth floor of Two Commerce Square, at 20th and Market Streets.
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NEWS
December 31, 2013 | Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER COLUMNIST
The box arrived at Ted Nobles' house in Middletown, Del., two days before Christmas, and, for the longest time, he let it sit there, unopened. "I was overwhelmed," he says. The sender was an older man in Fresno, Calif., a vet who had served in the same part of Europe during World War II as Nobles' great-uncle Wally. For more than a decade, Nobles had been researching the history of his family, including his maternal grandmother's only sibling, Lt. Wallace Lippincott Jr. - a Chester-born Quaker from Swarthmore who after graduating from the University of Delaware went off to war, drove a tank into the Battle of the Bulge, and never returned.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wolters Kluwer Health, the U.S. medical publishing arm of the European-based Wolters Kluwer information-services group, is closing its Ambler office and relocating 119 employees to Center City or to work at home, spokesman Robert Dekker said. "The goal of the move is not to reduce head count, rather, providing a more collaborative work environment," Dekker said Monday. The company is adding 8,000 square feet to its Medical Research and Professional and Education offices on the fifth floor of Two Commerce Square, at 20th and Market Streets.
NEWS
May 16, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 79-year-old Lansdowne doctor known for his civic involvement has been arrested and charged with selling prescription drugs from his home office. Lenwood Boyer Wert of the 200 block of North Lansdowne Avenue prescribed Oxycodone and other painkillers on a cash-only basis, Delaware County District Attorney Jack Whelan said. "Dr. Wert is no different than a drug dealer standing on the corner. In fact, he's worse because he's operating under the guise of a medical professional," Whelan said at a news conference to announce the arrest.
BUSINESS
May 4, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
With net income down 26.7 percent for the first quarter of this year, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. said Thursday that it would close its Bucks County manufacturing plant in 2017. The plant is on Cathill Road in West Rockhill Township and has a Sellersville address. About 450 people work there, according to a company spokeswoman, down from 472 as of Dec. 31, 2012, as noted in Teva's 2012 annual report on file with the Securities and Exchange Commission. About 40 people were notified in April that they would lose their jobs because of reduced demand for products made at the plant, according to the spokeswoman.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernice Harris Heller, 91, an editor for medical publications, died June 21 at Stapeley, a retirement residence in Germantown. Born to Russian Jewish émigrés, Mrs. Heller graduated from Olney High School. She hoped to pursue a career as a concert pianist, but after her father died in 1942, she had to help support her family, said her daughter, Irene. During World War II, she worked for a company supplying the Army Signal Corps. In 1946, she married Louis Heller. While raising a family in West Philadelphia and Wynnefield, she helped establish music classes and a day camp at Memorial Hall in Fairmount Park.
NEWS
October 13, 2010 | By JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 856-779-3231
One man was a public-school teacher, heading home from his second job to his beloved wife, a "daddy's little girl" asleep in bed and an unborn daughter he never got to meet. The other man had just huffed an aerosol can of keyboard cleaner in a Burlington County Walmart, authorities said, before also hitting the road. When Ryan Lippincott's Ford Contour veered into oncoming traffic about 10 p.m. March 18, authorities said, it killed 27-year-old music teacher Jonathan Hinkson on impact.
NEWS
April 1, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Barton Hirst Lippincott, 82, formerly of Chestnut Hill, retired chairman of J.B. Lippincott Co., died of pneumonia March 25 at Cathedral Village in Andorra. Mr. Lippincott was a great-grandson of Joshua Ballinger Lippincott, who established a publishing company in Philadelphia in 1836. He was also a great-grandson of Joseph Wharton, who founded the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He graduated from William Penn Charter School. During World War II, he served in the Navy in the states and in the Canal Zone.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2006 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After five generations, members of the Lippincott family are no longer running the Philadelphia publishing firm that bears their name. Joseph Wharton "Jay" Lippincott 3d "has resigned to pursue other career opportunities," Robert Dekker, spokesman for Wolters Kluwer, the Dutch owner of Center City-based Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, confirmed this week. Wolters had not announced Lippincott's departure, which took place earlier this year, or named a permanent replacement. "We thank Jay for his many contributions over 30 years of his career," Dekker said.
NEWS
October 20, 2004 | By Frank Kummer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Moorestown is one of the few South Jersey communities to have remained rich and influential since William Penn stepped off the boat. From the start, the township has had ties to early American stalwarts, such as William Biddle, a Quaker who came to Burlington County from England in the late 17th century and owned the land on which Moorestown sits, according to the West Jersey History Project. He later moved to Philadelphia and became progenitor of one of the wealthiest families in colonial America.
NEWS
January 29, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph Wharton Lippincott Jr., 88, retired chairman and president of the J.B. Lippincott Co. and supporter of public libraries, died Saturday of respiratory disease at his home in Bryn Mawr. Mr. Lippincott was the fourth generation of his family to head the Philadelphia publishing house, now known as Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins. He joined the company after graduating from Princeton University in 1937, and was president by the 1960s. "He believed publishers and authors should have close relationships," his son, Joseph "Jay" Lippincott 3d, said.
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