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Liquor Laws

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NEWS
December 8, 2011 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Score one for beer lovers. The Pennsylvania legislature on Wednesday voted to extend the hours beer distributors can stay open on Sundays. Until now, consumers have had to make Sunday beer runs between noon and 5 p.m. The measure passed by both the House and Senate - with little debate - would extend the hours on both ends, allowing distributors to stay open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. The bill now goes to Gov. Corbett, and a spokesman said last night the governor was expected to sign it. This loosening of Pennsylvania's stringent liquor laws comes as some top Republicans are pushing to privatize almost all of the state Liquor Control Board's operations.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
The calls for overhauling Pennsylvania's byzantine liquor laws have grown ever louder. But Philadelphia tavern owner Earl Martin fears what he is hearing is a last call for a big swig of his business. Like tavern owners across the state, Martin counts on take-out beer sales for a significant share of his revenue at Fibber McGee's Pub in Bridesburg. The booze business in Pennsylvania is peculiar. Beer isn't available at state liquor stores. Under current law, distributors can sell only by the case or keg; other take-out outlets are restricted to 192 ounces.
NEWS
May 8, 1986
I am writing in response to the April 29 editorial "The LCB in striped pants?" I did not find it entertaining at all. I would like to know your reason for saying the Liquor Control Board "leaves a lot to be desired in operating the State Store system or effectively enforcing liquor laws. " I ask you if the state went private would these outlets return profits to the state? I doubt it. Also, for the fiscal year ending 1984 the LCB made about $41 million. Carl M. Jolly Holland.
NEWS
May 16, 2012
Friday's "Home Economics" column incorrectly described content in AgentMatch's entry on real estate agent Christopher J. Artur. The website says Artur has listed 33 condos. A story in Tuesday's Inquirer about plans for a Labor Day weekend music festival made an unclear reference to the agents who enforce the state's liquor laws. They are known as liquor code enforcement agents and they are a unit of the State Police, not the Liquor Control Board. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357)
NEWS
November 29, 1986
The sordid little story of the J & G Tavern in South Philadelphia carries with it a larger lesson concerning the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board. It is this: The argument that the LCB is needed to control bars that become outrageously disruptive influences in their neighborhoods is a false one. The J & G case shows that the LCB can't control them - even when it does everything it can. We'll spare readers a reiteration of the tawdry details, recounted by neighbors, of the conduct connected with this bar, and merely give a partial list of the actions that have been taken by the LCB. The board has cited the bar at least 14 times since 1983 for violations of state laws.
NEWS
May 29, 2003
Our prayers ought to be private matters The May 20 guest column by Tom Krattenmaker ("Don't mix prayers, patriotism") misses several important points. I agree that far too many people today invoke the names of God or Our Lord before games, at bats, foul shots, and exams, and during any number of conflicts, large or small. It seems to me that we should not presume to enlist God on our side to influence the outcome but rather should ask Him to bless our effort and have His will be done.
NEWS
March 19, 1987 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Gov. Casey's proposals to reform the state liquor system, which began circulating among legislative leaders last night, would retain the Liquor Control Board for five more years but would make changes in enforcement, marketing and administration, government sources said yesterday. Those sources said that Casey would call for reforms in a few key areas and that perhaps the most significant would be to shift enforcement of liquor laws from the LCB to the state police, a change sought by former Gov. Dick Thornburgh during his attempts in the last six years to change the liquor system.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2009 | Compiled from The Inquirer, Associated Press, Bloomberg News
"Comcast can use this as an opportunity to shape the digital future. " - equity analyst Christopher Marangi, on Comcast Corp.'s bid for NBC Universal Inc. "I don't understand the fascination with content. " - telecom analyst Craig Moffett, also on Comcast/NBCU "It's encouraging to all investors when you see companies buy because basically what that says is, they're in a more aggressive mode as opposed to being in the fetal position. " - Mark Coffelt, portfolio manager at Empiric Funds, on an uptick in mergers and acquisitions "You would think a big business would have some sort of fallback.
NEWS
April 29, 1986
Considering that the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board leaves a lot to be desired in operating the State Store system or effectively enforcing liquor laws, it's rather frightening to contemplate the consequences if it moves into the field of foreign policy. Nonetheless, state Sen. Stewart J. Greenleaf (R., Montgomery) has tossed caution to the wind. He fired off a letter to LCB chairman Daniel Pennick last week requesting that the sale of French wines be prohibited in retaliation for France's refusal to allow U.S. planes to fly over its territory en route to and from England in the recent attack on Libya.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 6, 2015
POPE FRANCIS is due in Philly in September. I wish he were due in Harrisburg tomorrow. That's when the Legislature comes to the Capitol to be sworn in for a new two-year term. And you remember how His Papalness last month peppered the Curia, those running the Vatican and the Roman Catholic Church? Well, I wish he'd bestow the same sort of "blessing" on those who run our state government. Somebody should. And he or she can use the pope's outline. If you missed it, Francis lambasted church leaders for, among other things, vanity, selfishness and the "pathology of power.
NEWS
August 23, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The lawyer who peddled fine wines from his Main Line home made out with probation and community service. His wine might not fare as well. Police want to destroy the 2,426 bottles they seized in January from Arthur Goldman's Malvern home, the typical fate for bootleg booze. But this collection is not a typical bounty. It's far more valuable. Goldman is fighting to keep it, and wine enthusiasts say the thought of its being dumped is hard to swallow, an example of how Pennsylvania's antiquated liquor laws frustrate connoisseurs and seed a black market for alcohol unavailable in state stores.
NEWS
May 2, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Liquor privatization is bad. That seemed to be the sum total of testimony Tuesday at the first of three hearings in the state Senate on Gov. Corbett's push to get Pennsylvania out of the liquor business. The hearing in the Law and Justice Committee focused on the impact privatization would have on public health and law enforcement. Witnesses from the union for state troopers, who enforce liquor laws, and from drug and alcohol prevention and treatment groups said privatizing would lead to more liquor outlets, more drinking, and more alcohol-related crime and violence.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | Associated Press
HARRISBURG - A legislative panel on Monday endorsed a revamped version of Gov. Corbett's liquor-privatization bill that would give existing beer distributors first crack at liquor and wine licenses and expand beer and wine sales to grocery stores. In a 14-10 party-line vote, the House Liquor Committee backed a bill that would potentially phase out the existing state-controlled stores as the number of private operators grows. Both the GOP governor and Rep. John Taylor, the Philadelphia Republican who chairs the committee, called the amendment a "first step" that would lead to scrutiny of the complicated legislation not only on the House floor but in the Senate.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
The calls for overhauling Pennsylvania's byzantine liquor laws have grown ever louder. But Philadelphia tavern owner Earl Martin fears what he is hearing is a last call for a big swig of his business. Like tavern owners across the state, Martin counts on take-out beer sales for a significant share of his revenue at Fibber McGee's Pub in Bridesburg. The booze business in Pennsylvania is peculiar. Beer isn't available at state liquor stores. Under current law, distributors can sell only by the case or keg; other take-out outlets are restricted to 192 ounces.
NEWS
May 16, 2012
Friday's "Home Economics" column incorrectly described content in AgentMatch's entry on real estate agent Christopher J. Artur. The website says Artur has listed 33 condos. A story in Tuesday's Inquirer about plans for a Labor Day weekend music festival made an unclear reference to the agents who enforce the state's liquor laws. They are known as liquor code enforcement agents and they are a unit of the State Police, not the Liquor Control Board. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2012 | Howard Gensler
AFTER SCREENWRITER Joe Eszterhas ("Showgirls") sent a letter to the Los Angeles Times claiming that Mel Gibson was still an angry anti-Semite ("You hate Jews" sort of summed it up) and that Mel's proposed feature on Judah Maccabee (for which Joe was writing the script and which was recently dropped by Warner Bros.) was just a charade to improve his reputation, Mel responded with his own letter to the L.A. Times. Short version: Your screenplay sucked. Longer, excerpted version: "Contrary to your assertion that I was only developing Maccabees to burnish my tarnished reputation, I have been working on this project for over 10 years and it was publicly announced 8 years ago. I absolutely want to make this movie; it's just that neither Warner Brothers nor I want to make this movie based on your script.
NEWS
March 28, 2012 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Another year, another bill proposing to let Pennsylvania residents have wine shipped directly to their homes from out-of-state wineries. This time around, though, wine lovers and legislators supporting the cause are cautiously optimistic that 2012 could finally be the year the measure becomes law. The state Senate is poised to vote Wednesday on legislation that would allow direct shipments from out-of-state wineries to a Pennsylvanian's doorstep. By all accounts, the bill is expected to pass, though its fate is murkier in the House, as it is with Gov. Corbett.
NEWS
January 10, 2012 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - That Skinnygirl Margarita may soon cost you more. Same goes for your favorite Malbec and Chardonnay, not to mention your choice of vodka, scotch and liqueur. The state Liquor Control Board is scheduled to vote Wednesday on whether to approve an increase in prices on more than 450 wines and hard liquor brands. The increases, requested by the vendors of the alcoholic beverages, are usually proposed for either $1 and $2, but go as low as 50 cents and as high as $5. If the board votes in favor of the increase, it would mark the first time in a year and a half that wine and liquor prices have gone up. In that time, the board has rejected requests for hikes, given the bad economy.
NEWS
December 8, 2011 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Score one for beer lovers. The Pennsylvania legislature on Wednesday voted to extend the hours beer distributors can stay open on Sundays. Until now, consumers have had to make Sunday beer runs between noon and 5 p.m. The measure passed by both the House and Senate - with little debate - would extend the hours on both ends, allowing distributors to stay open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. The bill now goes to Gov. Corbett, and a spokesman said last night the governor was expected to sign it. This loosening of Pennsylvania's stringent liquor laws comes as some top Republicans are pushing to privatize almost all of the state Liquor Control Board's operations.
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