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Literacy

NEWS
September 3, 1992 | By Anne Tergesen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sande Maene Funston's most constant companions of late have been some of the characters that have introduced generations of children to reading: Frances, of Bread and Jam for Frances; Clifford the big red dog; the monkeys of Caps for Sale, and Sal of Blueberries for Sal. The third-grade teacher at Medford's Cranberry Pines School has been sitting up late in her family room recently, collating more than 1,500 pamphlets on childhood literacy and...
NEWS
July 23, 1999 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a highly competitive teacher recruitment market, the Philadelphia School District has attracted an unexpectedly high number of applicants from varied backgrounds in the search for a new kind of classroom teacher. More than 1,500 people inquired about working as a "literacy intern" in kindergarten and first-grade classrooms this fall. And more than 900 ended up applying for 265 available positions. Those selected met the minimum requirement: a bachelor's degree in a field other than teaching and a desire to do the job. They are spending part of the summer attending a nine-day training institute - a crash course, if you will - in how to teach young children to read and write.
NEWS
February 6, 2000 | By Leonard N. Fleming, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The passion for reading runs deep for Bettye T. Spinner, a retired English teacher from South Jersey who is quite comfortable curled up with a book of black literature or poetry. Promoting literacy is another love. That is why Spinner will be at the Burlington County Library in Westampton conducting an hour-long reading session as part of the African American Read-In today. In its 11th year, the Read-In is a nationwide effort to make literacy a significant part of Black History Month through community reading sessions.
LIVING
November 22, 1987 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leroy Williams pushes his worldly possessions around Philadelphia in a grocery cart, a suitcase strapped to the side. Each Friday, about noon, he chains his cart to a tree at Broad and Lombard. Then he walks into a senior-citizens center for help with fractions. He sits down at a table with his tutor, searches the pockets of his tattered blue blazer for a sharpened pencil, and digs out a workbook from his burlap bag. "I want to start my own business," said Williams, 64. "But I never did learn anything about fractions.
BUSINESS
November 14, 1993 | By John J. Fried, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In Oakland, Calif., a man rushed into a 700-gallon chemical-sludge tank to rescue a fellow worker overcome by fumes. The co-worker was critically injured but survived. The rescuer died a short time later at a local hospital. Near Atlanta, a cleaning woman poured a sulfuric acid cleaner into a plugged drain that someone had tried to clear out with a lye solution. The mixture exploded so violently that the woman was blown into an adjoining room and burned over 80 percent of her body.
NEWS
March 10, 1998 | By Bernardine H. Watson and John J. DiIulio Jr
During a recent trip to Los Angeles, we met with an organization called Los Angeles Metropolitan Churches (LAMC). For the last three years, LAMC has been working to get passed into law an initiative that would allow the courts to require any person convicted of a nonviolent crime to make progress toward obtaining a 12th grade education or GED, as a condition of probation. This initiative is intriguing because of what the data tell us about the connection between crime and illiteracy.
NEWS
February 21, 2002 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An experimental after-school literacy program run out of religious institutions boosted children's reading skills by an average of two grade levels, a panel of civic and philanthropic leaders announced yesterday. Philadelphia youngsters who participated for 90 days in the Youth Education for Tomorrow program advanced by 1.4 grade levels, and those who stayed with the program for a year advanced by two grades, according to figures released at a City Hall press conference. Mayor Street, who has been an advocate for faith-based community-improvement programs and was one of the presenters at yesterday's press conference, said he looks forward to the day when the YET model is used "in virtually every public school in the city.
LIVING
April 26, 1998 | By Ralph Cipriano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maurice Brian Henderson, playwright, poet, and star of the TV talk-show circuit, was sitting in his classroom on South Broad Street, listening to a young rap artist explain his "rugged form of poetry. " "I sort of rap about my experience," said Marlow Crawford of the group TaKilla Mercenaries. Crawford's raps include the one about being an entrepreneur: "Every dog gets their day. How do you think Trump got his plaza and Hilton got his hotel?" But in Henderson's class, Crawford was playing to a tough crowd.
NEWS
May 23, 2004 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Gloria DiMedio still gets butterflies when she returns to the East Camden elementary school that she attended from kindergarten to the sixth grade. Although the Henry H. Davis School at 34th Street and Westfield Avenue is only a shadow of what it used to be and the neighborhood around it has deteriorated, the smiling faces of the students eager to learn are the same as ones she remembers from her childhood. DiMedio returns to the neighborhood once a week as a volunteer for Book Mates, a tutoring program for young children that encourages them to pick up a book and read about people and places that they may not otherwise experience.
NEWS
August 25, 1992 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Frances Coleman couldn't speak. She couldn't read. She didn't, she recalls, know much of anything. She wanted so much to learn, but no one would teach her. She grew up in a home for retarded people. That was before she met Kitty Seminole, a 77-year-old woman confined to a wheelchair who tutored Coleman three days a week, two hours a lesson, for the last 13 years. Now Coleman, who has cerebral palsy, can talk. She can read, she knows her math. Earlier this summer, Coleman got her general equivalency diploma.
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