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Literacy

NEWS
March 19, 2013
A LEJANDRO Gac-Artigas, 24, of Center City, wants to eradicate the literacy gap among Philly's schoolchildren. Two years ago, the Harvard grad and then-first-grade teacher at Pan American Academy Charter School founded the nonprofit Springboard Collaborative to run a summer-reading program. This summer, Springboard expects to have 960 students in the program.   Q: What's your background? A: From 2009 to 2011, I taught 34 students literacy and social studies. I also got a master's degree at night from the School of Graduate Education at Penn and I was tapped for Wharton's Venture Initiation Program.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City of Chester officials will announce today that the city has received a grant to support a financial literacy course for the city's summer youth program. The $4,000 DollarWise Grant Award, from the the Bank of America Charitable Foundation, will support a six-week paid internship for Chester youths. The program is designed to provide hands-on work experience and professional development. There is also a financial educational component. Chester officials and those from four other cities - Wichita, St. Louis, Kokomo, IN and Richmond, VA - learned they were awarded the grant at the U.S. Conference of Mayors this past January.
NEWS
April 11, 2012 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
On Saturday mornings for the last few months, Wharton professor Keith Weigelt has taught West Philadelphia residents - they call him Mr. Keith - about money, earning, saving, investing. For many students, this was the first time they learned about mutual funds. "White households have 20 times the amount of median wealth as black households," says Weigelt, 61. "We're trying to reduce the wealth gap by teaching financial literacy. I had this woman in tears telling me that, for the first time, she feels she can get out of poverty.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | BY HALEY KMETZ, Daily News Staff Writer
IF YOU'VE been thinking about getting your GED and you're not too good with computers, then get a move on. Effective January 2014, the high-school equivalency test will be more rigorous and entirely computerized, requiring a level of digital fluency that education advocates here say could hinder many test-takers. The GED was last revised in 2002, but for its next incarnation the test will be overhauled by a magnitude never before seen in its 70-year existence. Last year, the American Council on Education, which manages the test nationwide, partnered with a computer-based testing company to develop an assessment that they believe will better prepare students for modern workplace demands.
NEWS
March 14, 2012
One reader's idea: "I always keep a children's book in my backpack, and have given out about 20 or so on the train ride home. "Any time I see someone with a child, I just casually hand him or her a book - no big deal, no real thanks needed. "If we could just get people to put an extra book in their bag and practice a 'random act of literacy' during their commute, think of the number of books you would put in the hands of kids. "Simple, anonymous, and enjoyable!
NEWS
March 14, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER real estate writer
Although the United States has proved itself able to meet challenges from outside its borders, ING Direct founder Arkadi Kuhlmann said challenges from "within have been the most difficult to define and deal with. " "There seems to be an inability to find a consensus in all matters that affect our personal lives," Kuhlmann told an audience of financial leaders and consumer-advocacy groups Tuesday at the Hyatt at the Bellevue in Center City. The occasion was the annual community awards luncheon of the Philadelphia consumer organization Clarifi.
NEWS
March 12, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Getting to the school in a remote Tanzanian village meant 22 hours of travel, including three plane rides and an exceedingly bumpy, four-hour Jeep trek. But Sister Francesca Onley, the 79-year-old president of Holy Family University, is glad she made the trip. With money from a United Nations organization, Holy Family teamed with a Stanford University professor to give handheld learning computers and phones to teenagers who live in impoverished conditions who had little previous experience with technology.
NEWS
January 23, 2012
Greg Corbin Teacher, founded Philadelphia Youth Poetry Movement and created the Legacy Project, which explores the multilayered black male experience through a one-man theatrical performance and community workshops. ($25,000) Tyree Dumas Founded DollarBoyz, a youth-entertainment company, and heads Youth Now on Top (Y-NOT), a program in which youths create and run their own businesses. ($35,000) Russell Hicks Created FLASH MOB, a social media and entrepreneurship training program for black males, 16 to 25 years old. ($20,500)
NEWS
January 9, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sarah Boardman Furnas, 68, of Chestnut Hill, a senior administrator with the Philadelphia Health Promotion Council who helped simplify health-care and medical literature for consumers, died of cancer Thursday, Dec. 22, at Pennsylvania Hospital. The nonprofit council, on which Mrs. Furnas served from 1986 to 2002, was founded in 1981 as the Southeastern Pennsylvania High Blood Pressure Control Program. Funded by the Pennsylvania Department of Health, its mission is to implement community-based programs to fight hypertension.
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