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Literary Agent

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NEWS
October 5, 2012
Wendy Weil, 72, a literary agent known for her low-key but determined style and for an eclectic clientele of groundbreaking and best-selling authors, died Sept. 22 of a heart attack at her country home in Cornwall, Conn. A New York native and graduate of Wellesley College, Ms. Weil had Alice Walker, Rita Mae Brown, Fannie Flagg, and Mark Helprin among her clients. She was in publishing for 50 years. She started in the training program at Doubleday, then moved on to become an agent, eventually founding Wendy Weil Agency Inc. in 1986.
NEWS
February 8, 1998 | By Frank Greve and Ron Hutcheson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
If America's political life has come to sound like a superheated soap opera, you can thank the spectacle's producer, brassy New York literary agent Lucianne Goldberg, whose own life is a confection of sex, political intrigue - and fiction. Long before her pivotal role in the Monica Lewinsky case - as instigator, investigator and publicist - Goldberg engaged in a series of other clandestine escapades involving politicians. In the early 1960s, Goldberg, then a White House job-seeker in her mid-20s, was blackballed by the inner circle of Vice President Lyndon Johnson.
NEWS
July 14, 1994 | Daily News wire services
NEW YORK POPE'S BOOK TO BE PUBLISHED THIS FALL Pope John Paul II's writings about Catholicism will be published worldwide in the fall, the New York Times reported today. "Crossing the Threshold of Hope" is a collection of the pope's answers to questions about the church's global role, the newspaper said. The estimated millions of dollars the pope will receive for publishing rights were to be donated to charity. Alfred A. Knopf will publish the book in the United States.
NEWS
January 27, 2006 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marley & Me, Inquirer columnist John Grogan's best-selling tale about his sweet but goofy Labrador retriever, is in line to become a film. Fox 2000, the studio that put former Inquirer columnist Jennifer Weiner's novel In Her Shoes on screen last year, bought the rights, the studio announced yesterday. Terms were not disclosed, but the deal was "substantial," Grogan said. Such deals usually involve graduated payouts, sometimes in the high six figures or even low seven figures.
SPORTS
June 7, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Jose Canseco admitted in meetings with potential book publishers this week in New York that he used steroids while he was playing in the majors, his literary agent confirmed in a story in today's Wall Street Journal. It is the first admission Canseco has made regarding his own steroid use, although it's long been rumored. It comes less than a week after former National League MVP Ken Caminiti told Sports Illustrated he used steroids as well. Canseco also told publishers he used steroids with, and helped obtain them for, other players, Ronald Laitsch, Canseco's literary agent, confirmed to the Journal.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1986 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
"Over My Dead Body," a comedy-mystery by Michael Sutton and Anthony Fingleton, suggested by the novel "The Murder League," by Robert L. Fish. Directed by Will Stutts, set by Michael Powers, costumes by Debbie Pokallus, lighting by Jeff Goldstein, sound by Ron Cohen. Presented by the Society Hill Playhouse, 507 S. 8th St. Wed.-Sat. through Feb. 8. On the morning after a dark and stormy night, an American literary agent known for his drinking and nasty disposition is found dead in the reading room of The Murder League, a London club for professional mystery writers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1989 | USA Today, the New York Daily News, the New York Post, People magazine and the Associated Press contributed to this report
POETRY IN MOTION If you love him on television, now you can hear him on wax. Ron Pearlman that half-creature/half-human of "Beauty and the Beast," has released "Of Love and Hope," an album of sonnets and such by Keats, Shelley, Frost, Byron and the like. He reads these dillies in his "Beast" voice, of course. "I'd read some to my real lady, my wife (designer Opal Stone), when I was courting her," Pearlman admits. "The truth is, this fantasy character I play has enriched my personal life.
NEWS
May 2, 1994 | By Linda Loyd, with reports from Inquirer wire services
THANKS, MAYBE WE'LL JUST RENT INSTEAD You thought those posh homes in your neighborhood were high-priced? Check out Hong Kong, where a two-story home, described as "fairly modest," recently sold for $32.7 million - or $2,000 a square foot. It was a record in Hong Kong's exclusive Victoria Peak neighborhood, but the record is not expected to stand for long. Demand for upscale housing in Hong Kong is booming, says real estate agent Raymond Ho. So you're wondering what a ham sandwich costs?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1990 | By Barbara Beck, Daily News Staff Writer
The Charles Stuart murder-suicide case that rocked Boston and gripped much of the country is provoking a flurry of book proposals as well as theatrical and television movies. Boston publishing house Little, Brown and Co. received the first call hours before Charles Stuart's body had been pulled from the river. Colleen Mohyde, an assistant editor at at Little, Brown and Co., said at least eight more literary agents and writers have contacted her about books on the sensational story of Stuart who committed suicide after becoming the prime suspect in his pregnant wife's slaying.
NEWS
March 23, 1991 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles Carpenter Batchelder was an elegant host. Guests who visited his mansion on Delancey Place were quickly supplied with cocktails. And when the party really got going, Mr. Batchelder - "Carp" to his friends - would sit at the piano and belt out his favorite song by his old friend, Cole Porter: It was just one of those things Just one of those fabulous flings A trip to the moon on gossamer wings It was just one...
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NEWS
October 5, 2012
Wendy Weil, 72, a literary agent known for her low-key but determined style and for an eclectic clientele of groundbreaking and best-selling authors, died Sept. 22 of a heart attack at her country home in Cornwall, Conn. A New York native and graduate of Wellesley College, Ms. Weil had Alice Walker, Rita Mae Brown, Fannie Flagg, and Mark Helprin among her clients. She was in publishing for 50 years. She started in the training program at Doubleday, then moved on to become an agent, eventually founding Wendy Weil Agency Inc. in 1986.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2012 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
If somebody told you Pete Townshend, Thomas Keller, Salman Rushdie, Zadie Smith, David Byrne, Jose Garces, and Martin Amis were going to the same place within the next few months, you'd say that hot spot was hosting some great gatherings, where wit flowed like wine. If that same swinging location turned out to be the Free Library's Central Library on Vine Street you might be shocked - unless you're one of the audience members who fill the library's ticketed events and free readings with increasing frequency.
NEWS
September 29, 2012 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
The national Republican Party's congressional campaign arm is trying to link the Democrat in a close Bucks County race to convicted police killer Mumia Abu-Jamal by pointing to legal work her husband did more than a decade ago. The GOP attack on Kathryn Boockvar, launched online late Wednesday and followed Thursday with automated phone calls to voters, focuses on her husband's defense of Abu-Jamal's literary agent in a 1999 arrest and on his previous...
NEWS
January 27, 2006 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marley & Me, Inquirer columnist John Grogan's best-selling tale about his sweet but goofy Labrador retriever, is in line to become a film. Fox 2000, the studio that put former Inquirer columnist Jennifer Weiner's novel In Her Shoes on screen last year, bought the rights, the studio announced yesterday. Terms were not disclosed, but the deal was "substantial," Grogan said. Such deals usually involve graduated payouts, sometimes in the high six figures or even low seven figures.
NEWS
February 24, 2004 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Will Russia soon evict novelist Vladimir Nabokov for a second time? Born in 1899 to a wealthy St. Petersburg family that lived in a splendid three-story townhouse here at Bolshaya Morskaya 47, the future world-famous author of Lolita and other novels had to flee the city - and the townhouse - with his family in 1917 as the Bolshevik Revolution gathered steam. In 1997, a group of private, independent Nabokov admirers - among them the literary agent of Nabokov's son and executor, Dmitri - approached the St. Petersburg city government during the freewheeling post-perestroika Yeltsin era. They asked if they could establish a Nabokov Museum in a handful of rooms in the once-palatial mansion to honor the writer, who died in 1977.
SPORTS
June 7, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Jose Canseco admitted in meetings with potential book publishers this week in New York that he used steroids while he was playing in the majors, his literary agent confirmed in a story in today's Wall Street Journal. It is the first admission Canseco has made regarding his own steroid use, although it's long been rumored. It comes less than a week after former National League MVP Ken Caminiti told Sports Illustrated he used steroids as well. Canseco also told publishers he used steroids with, and helped obtain them for, other players, Ronald Laitsch, Canseco's literary agent, confirmed to the Journal.
SPORTS
June 7, 2002 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Former major-league slugger Jose Canseco admitted in meetings with potential book publishers this week in New York that he used steroids while he was playing baseball, his literary agent confirmed in an article in today's Wall Street Journal. It appeared to be the first admission that Canseco has made regarding his own steroid use, although it has long been rumored. It came less than a week after former National League MVP Ken Caminiti told Sports Illustrated that he used steroids as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1999 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Coming soon to a theater near you: a bookbag of literary adaptations. For the holidays, when Oscar hopefuls traditionally host their coming-out parties, Hollywood is serving up a slew of titles more familiar to Borders' cats than to multiplex rats. Angela's Ashes; Anna and the King; The Cider House Rules; Girl, Interrupted; Snow Falling on Cedars: Of 30 major releases scheduled for the final weeks of 1999 (some of which will land here in January), more than half are based on literary works.
NEWS
February 8, 1998 | By Frank Greve and Ron Hutcheson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
If America's political life has come to sound like a superheated soap opera, you can thank the spectacle's producer, brassy New York literary agent Lucianne Goldberg, whose own life is a confection of sex, political intrigue - and fiction. Long before her pivotal role in the Monica Lewinsky case - as instigator, investigator and publicist - Goldberg engaged in a series of other clandestine escapades involving politicians. In the early 1960s, Goldberg, then a White House job-seeker in her mid-20s, was blackballed by the inner circle of Vice President Lyndon Johnson.
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