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NEWS
March 23, 2003 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Is creative writing still relevant in this shorthand era of e-mail and text messaging? Definitely, said Michael Mullen, faculty adviser to Pen & Ink, Haverford High School's literary magazine. "Our kids are really great creative writers. I stand in awe of them," he said. And the American Scholastic Press Association agrees with him: The 2002 edition of Pen & Ink won first place with special merit in the group's 2002 competition, scoring 975 of a possible 1,000 points. Pen & Ink was one of four winners from Pennsylvania in a contest that drew about 350 entries nationwide.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1986 | By Philip Walzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The obscure writer and the Nobel laureate, the Philadelphia notable and the New York luminary - they're all represented in a new literary magazine founded by a local professor. The debut issue of Boulevard, brainchild of Richard Burgin, a writer and assistant professor of humanities at Drexel University, is arriving in local bookstores today and soon will be making its way across the country. Resembling a paperback, the $4.50 "inaugural double issue" is impressively thick (nearly 190 pages)
NEWS
December 25, 1994 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The delicate cutting edge of satire is gone. Structured verse has disappeared. Artwork is less cartoonlike. For more than 20 years, Jean Priniski has seen these, and other changes in the Pen & Ink literary magazine she advises at Haverford High School. And this year, the award-winning magazine is celebrating its 60th anniversary. In keeping with the tradition of its founding, Priniski said the magazine is a place where students can display their written work. "It's also a place where student art work can be showcased," Priniski said.
NEWS
November 14, 2012
The student newspaper at Conestoga High School in Berwyn received one of two top state awards for its design and writing during the 2011-12 school year. The Spoke was given the Clyde F. Lytle Keystone All-State Award at the Pennsylvania School Press Association's annual meeting this month. The school's newspaper advisers are Susan Houseman and Cynthia Crothers-Hyatt. The other student newspaper honored was Catasauqua High School's Brown and White. In the literary magazine category, Merion Mercy Academy's Image Explosion received a top Lytle award.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
LOUIS C. McKEE once said that it requires a large dose of arrogance to think that anyone would be interested in "something you have thought and written down. " That's why, he said, writers who think they are poets are advised to hide their poems "in a box under the bed. " Fortunately for those who enjoy the kind of poetry that Louis McKee was known for - "clarity and candor," as one critic observed - he didn't hide his work under the bed. He published his poetry in more than a dozen chapbooks while also serving as an editor and reviewer of the efforts of fellow scribblers.
SPORTS
February 5, 1991 | By Gwen Knapp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Haverford School kept a 14-year Inter-Ac winning streak alive when it beat Chestnut Hill Academy in squash on Friday. The score was 6-1. CHA handed Haverford its last league loss in 1977. In the last seven years, the Fords have lost just one high school match - to the Hill School. Haverford frequently plays junior-varsity teams from Ivy League colleges. So does CHA, which this season had lost only to the Yale JV before meeting the Fords. Monsignor Bonner swimmer Paul DeConti has a two-year unbeaten streak in the 100-yard backstroke.
NEWS
June 8, 1995 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg and Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
After two months of practice, second graders in Karen Speakman's class at Gladwyne Elementary School in the Lower Merion School District have created and performed an original fairy-tale opera called It Takes Two. After the youngsters and Speakman worked on ideas for the opera, Speakman wrote original arias and lyrics. She also used music from The Barber of Seville, The Magic Flute, Madame Butterfly, and Hansel and Gretel. Speakman, the children and their parents designed and made the scenery and costumes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2011 | By BECKY BATCHA, batchab@phillynews.com 215-854-5757
ON FRIDAY, the most famous Philadelphia author that you've never heard of will be the toast of bookish New York when she promenades in to a "literary debutante ball" at a factory loft building deep in hipster Brooklyn. Writer Robin Black will be one of five literary debs in the limelight that night celebrating the publication of their first books. Hers is a collection of short stories, 2010's If I Loved You, I Would Tell You This . She'll also be a duck out of water. Just shy of 50, Black is a lot of things: a serious new voice in fiction with a big contract at Random House and a national book tour next month, the recipient of rave reviews from TV talk-show host Oprah Winfrey's O magazine and NPR, a former Penn law student (briefly)
NEWS
November 19, 1987 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International and the New York Daily News.)
A grand jury in Dallas refused to indict David Bowie on rape charges because of a lack of evidence, the district attorney's office announced yesterday. Wanda Nichols, 30, had accused the rocker of forcing himself on her in his hotel room after a concert last month. Bowie, 40, now touring Australia, acknowledged having spent the night with Nichols but called rape charges "ridiculous" and a ploy by Nichols for attention. In a related matter, Bowie's lawyer said his client was willing to take an AIDS test (Nichols said Bowie told her he had the disease)
NEWS
January 16, 1995 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It began with a nighttime walk along the outskirts of Tangier and a suggestion as alluring as the pull of Morocco itself. Why not, the author and composer Paul Bowles asked a young friend that evening, start a literary magazine? The first issue of Antaeus - which included a short story by Bowles, an interview with Gore Vidal, an article by Jerzy Kosinski, and a poem by Tennessee Williams - came out two years later, in 1970. Now the quarterly published from Hopewell, N.J., is in the second printing of its final edition, a 410-page volume whose 77 contributors include Nobel laureates Nadine Gordimer, Czeslaw Milosz and Joseph Brodsky - along with Bill Clinton and Stephen King.
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NEWS
November 14, 2012
The student newspaper at Conestoga High School in Berwyn received one of two top state awards for its design and writing during the 2011-12 school year. The Spoke was given the Clyde F. Lytle Keystone All-State Award at the Pennsylvania School Press Association's annual meeting this month. The school's newspaper advisers are Susan Houseman and Cynthia Crothers-Hyatt. The other student newspaper honored was Catasauqua High School's Brown and White. In the literary magazine category, Merion Mercy Academy's Image Explosion received a top Lytle award.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
LOUIS C. McKEE once said that it requires a large dose of arrogance to think that anyone would be interested in "something you have thought and written down. " That's why, he said, writers who think they are poets are advised to hide their poems "in a box under the bed. " Fortunately for those who enjoy the kind of poetry that Louis McKee was known for - "clarity and candor," as one critic observed - he didn't hide his work under the bed. He published his poetry in more than a dozen chapbooks while also serving as an editor and reviewer of the efforts of fellow scribblers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2011 | By BECKY BATCHA, batchab@phillynews.com 215-854-5757
ON FRIDAY, the most famous Philadelphia author that you've never heard of will be the toast of bookish New York when she promenades in to a "literary debutante ball" at a factory loft building deep in hipster Brooklyn. Writer Robin Black will be one of five literary debs in the limelight that night celebrating the publication of their first books. Hers is a collection of short stories, 2010's If I Loved You, I Would Tell You This . She'll also be a duck out of water. Just shy of 50, Black is a lot of things: a serious new voice in fiction with a big contract at Random House and a national book tour next month, the recipient of rave reviews from TV talk-show host Oprah Winfrey's O magazine and NPR, a former Penn law student (briefly)
NEWS
August 13, 2003 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
It was a tough morning for the staff at the Paris Review. This was no mere literary crisis. They had just lost their first softball game of the season to the comic-parody magazine the Onion, and forlorn looks abounded. But down from his office to the rescue came their boss, George Plimpton, wearing his new Boston Red Sox warm-up jacket. Noting that pushovers like the New Yorker and Vanity Fair were still on the schedule, Plimpton offered a strategy. "Everyone in softball hits it to the left side.
NEWS
March 23, 2003 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Is creative writing still relevant in this shorthand era of e-mail and text messaging? Definitely, said Michael Mullen, faculty adviser to Pen & Ink, Haverford High School's literary magazine. "Our kids are really great creative writers. I stand in awe of them," he said. And the American Scholastic Press Association agrees with him: The 2002 edition of Pen & Ink won first place with special merit in the group's 2002 competition, scoring 975 of a possible 1,000 points. Pen & Ink was one of four winners from Pennsylvania in a contest that drew about 350 entries nationwide.
NEWS
February 9, 2003 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
If you know the sting of laboring over a poem or short story only to be rebuked by publishers, take heart. The Writer's Block is back. After a hiatus of nearly four years, the literary publication is being produced in the spare bedroom of a Collingswood woman with a zeal for originality. Stacy Shannon, 25, and her good friend Rebecca Mercurio of Barrington, also 25, embrace previously unpublished work in their dozen-page quarterly. This time around, the publication is more polished and comes with a Web site, a logo and other improvements, such as better-quality paper.
NEWS
April 2, 2001 | By Lauren Mayk INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
There were no dusty books or yellowing newsprint pages used as props in a poetry- and fiction-writing workshop held this weekend at Rutgers University-Camden. Instead, Daniel Nester and Tom Hartman sat in front of a large screen in one of the college's newly wired classrooms, showing a few of the hundreds of Webzines that have sprouted up in recent years. Nester was pitching a new way of publishing to aspiring authors at Rutgers-Camden's 14th annual Spring Writers Conference on Saturday.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2000 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was crunch time for students working on Electric Soup, the multimedia literary magazine that is published online by Hunterdon Central Regional High School. There were Web pages to complete, images and graphics to tweak, and hyperlinks to insert and check. Florence McGinn's classroom inside the school in Flemington, N.J., was humming with activity. Knots of student-editors were clustered around computers, working together on sections of the 15th edition of a student publication that receives submissions from around the world.
NEWS
December 4, 2000 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Claude Francis Koch, 82, an author, recipient of the O. Henry Award for short stories, and professor emeritus at La Salle University, died on Saturday of pneumonia at his home in Chestnut Hill. Mr. Koch grew up in the city's Fern Hill Park section and graduated from Northeast Catholic High School in 1936. He earned a bachelor's degree in business from then-La Salle College and a master's degree in creative writing from the University of Florida in 1957. Immediately after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Mr. Koch enlisted in the United States Marine Corps.
LIVING
August 24, 2000 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In Absalom, Absalom!, the 1936 novel William Faulkner wrote at Rowan Oak, the antebellum mansion where he lived most of his life, the author issued the marching orders that have driven writers in this self-mythologizing region for decades. "Tell about the South," Faulkner exhorted. "What it's like there. What do they do there. Why do they live there. Why do they live at all. " Marc Smirnoff took that pep talk to heart and, in 1992, founded the Oxford American, the bimonthly Southern literary journal he now co-owns with legal-thriller writer John Grisham, the other literary figure whose shadow looms over this tiny (population 15,000)
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